Gender Pay Gap Report - McLaren Construction Group Gender pay gap report | 2019 Gender pay gap: mean

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  • Gender Pay Gap Report April 2019

  • 2Gender Pay Gap Report | April 2019

    Gender pay gap report | 2019 Gender pay gap: mean

    The figures shown below are based on the mean difference in average hourly pay of all men and women within McLaren Construction, regardless of their job role.

    To calculate the mean difference, we add the total hourly pay for all men and divide by the number of men to get the average. We add the total hourly pay for women and divide by the total number of women to get the average. The two figures are then compared by calculating the average hourly rate for women as a percentage of the average hourly rate

    for men to get the mean hourly gender pay gap.

    Mean gender pay gap 5 April 2017

    48.7% Mean gender pay gap 5 April 2018

    50.6% Mean gender pay gap 5 April 2019

    47.4% Gender pay gap: median

    The figures shown are based on the median difference in average hourly pay of all men and women within McLaren Construction, regardless of their job role.

    To calculate the median, we arrange the hourly pay for men and the hourly pay for women from the lowest to the highest to find the midpoint value for each gender. We then calculate the difference between the two midpoint values to give us the median hourly pay gap.

    Median gender pay gap 5 April 2017

    51.4% Median gender pay gap 5 April 2018

    58.4% Median gender pay gap 5 April 2019

    49.4% Median and mean gender pay gap in hourly pay: results

    The 2019 figures reveal a decrease in the mean and median gender pay gap in hourly pay, which is an improvement on the 2018 figures. The mean hourly pay gap has decreased by 3.2 per cent and the median hourly pay gap has decreased 9 per cent. This is partly attributed to the appointment of more women into senior leadership roles, two of which are new within the organisation. These appointments were key to McLaren meeting the growing demands of the business.

  • 3Gender Pay Gap Report | April 2019

    Employee numbers

    Comparable to several organisations within the construction industry, the number of men within McLaren far outweighs the number of women in our workforce.

    The number of relevant full pay women employed during the reporting period rose from 113 to 117, a modest increase of 3.53 per cent. However, within this time, in addition to the senior appointees, McLaren Construction has also taken on

    women in surveying and engineering roles.

    509 employees

    88 Women

    421 Men

    5 April 2017

    589 employees

    113 Women

    476 Men

    5 April 2018

    Number of relevant full-pay employees

    634 employees

    117 Women

    517 Men

    5 April 2019

    5 April 2017

    83% 17%

    5 April 2018

    81% 19%

    Percentage split

    5 April 2019

    82% 19%

  • 4Gender Pay Gap Report | April 2019

  • 5Gender Pay Gap Report | April 2019

    Pay quartiles

    The pay quartile pie charts shown are based on hourly pay for men and women. To calculate this, the pay of employees is arranged in ascending order. This is then split into two halves from the middle of the list. These two halves are then divided in two, giving four quartiles.

    A key factor to the gender pay gap figures at McLaren Construction is that there are more women in junior and administrative roles compared to men in the business. Within the construction industry, there is occupational segregation. Given that most of our senior roles are held by men, this inevitably leaves women mainly in the lower and lower-middle paid quartiles within the business.

    However, we have seen an increase of 1.8 per cent of women in the upper quartile in comparison to the 2018 figures. This

    is a result of newly created senior roles filled by women within the business.

    Lower quartile Lower middle quartile

    Upper middle quartile

    Upper quartile

    55.7% 78.0% 96.2% 96.2% 44.3% 22.0% 3.8% 3.8%

    Lower quartile

    44.3% Women

    55.7% Men

    22.0% Women

    78.0% Men

    Lower middle quartile

    3.8% Women

    96.2% Men

    3.8% Women

    96.2% Men

    Upper middle quartile

    Upper quartile

  • 6Gender Pay Gap Report | April 2019

    Bonus gender pay gap: who received a bonus

    Proportion of relevant employees with bonus pay 5 April 2017

    Proportion of relevant employees with bonus pay 5 April 2018

    64.4% 68.3%

    44.7% 58.9%

    Our mean and median bonus gender pay gap reflects the number of men holding senior positions within the company.

    Median bonus gender pay gap 5 April 2017

    70.0% Median bonus gender pay gap 5 April 2018

    75.0% Median bonus gender pay gap 5 April 2019

    75.0%

    McLaren Construction has a discretionary annual bonus scheme for which all employees are eligible.

    The number of women receiving bonus payments increased by 14.1 per cent in the year to April 2019. This is due to more women becoming eligible for the salary bonus scheme as a result of their increased length of service.

    Mean bonus gender pay gap 5 April 2017

    75.7% Mean bonus gender pay gap 5 April 2018

    75.9% Mean bonus gender pay gap 5 April 2019

    79.4%

    Proportion of relevant employees with bonus pay 5 April 2019

    70.0%

    73.0%

  • 7Gender Pay Gap Report | April 2019

  • 8Gender Pay Gap Report | April 2019

    What we are doing to close the gap

    Our 2019 result shows an improvement on the 2018 figures; however, we acknowledge the need to take further steps to address our gender pay gap. Typically, due to the nature of the construction industry, there is often a large disparity between the proportion of men and women employed in the industry. McLaren is committed to playing our part in closing this gap, while also paying a fair salary/bonus to bring a gender balance into our business. The 2019 result is evidence of our commitment to this and we will continue to implement policies to ensure we continue to improve our performance.

    We recognise that changing the perception of the construction industry will attract more women into the industry and can help to close the gender pay gap. This includes debunking myths about construction being exclusively for boys and men. We are delivering against this theme through our learning and development strategy championed by our Head of Talent and Development. She is passionate about promoting construction as an attractive career path for women and under-represented groups and spearheads our campaigns for reaching out to these groups.

    In the last year, some of our activities have included partnering with local authorities and the third sector to organise educational visits and careers fairs at several schools and higher education establishments in the UK. Women in our senior management have held lectures in universities in support of these activities. Notable of this is a lecture hosted by a senior member of our principal design management team at Loughborough University about her experience as a woman working in construction and her journey into a senior role within McLaren. The positive feedback from this lecture and other events has informed our strategy to ensure we achieve our objectives.

    Part of this strategy is to intensify our activities and work with more education establishments and partners.

    Our youth talent pipeline identifies groups to target to make our initiatives more effective and it will shape our activities for this year. For example, the age groups 8-11 years and 11-16 years are vital to the long-term goal of ensuring that construction is viewed as a viable career path for both boys and girls. We will scale up our activities to reach these groups by leveraging upon our established relationships with schools and other agencies, while developing new ones. We will organise more Construction Awareness Careers Fairs in schools and help to introduce construction to young people as a career path at an early age.

    It is entirely in our interest to help attract more women into the industry, as it will help alleviate some of the skills shortages in disciplines including Quantity Surveying, Design Management and Operations Management. Our strategy for achieving this involves working with colleges and higher institutions to design courses targeted at young people within the 16-25 age group. We already have partnerships in place with the likes of Barking and Dagenham College and the CITB, which is yielding some positive results.

    We are also using our Early Careers brochure available on our website, as a way of reaching women. These have been designed to cover the range of construction related roles and group corporate functions available within the business, providing varied career paths. The brochures are distributed at careers events and serve as a real eye opener to young people who may not have been aware that STEM careers are within reach for both boys and girls.

    We are completely focused on promoting women’s advancement and achieve a gender balanced business. We will continue to take meaningful and tangible steps to accomplish a generational change and see results in the longer years.