of 1 /1
331 METROPOLITAN HOSPITAL SUNDAY FUND. - I UP to Thursday morning, July 28th, about .663,000, which includes f.24,584 from the executors of the late Mr. George Herring, had been received at the Mansion House. Among the additional church collections are :— ;&bgr; s. d. St. Mary Abbot’s, Kensington ............... 494 0 0 (St. Mary Abbot’s..S348 ; St. Paul’s, Vicarage Gate, 289 ; Christ Church, Victoria-road, ,e57) Holy Trinity, Sloane-street .................. 465 0 0 West London Synagogue .................. 324 0 0 St. Paul’s, Iinightsbriige .................. 272 0 0 Great Synagogue ..................... 239 0 0 St..Iarys,Bryani:ton-squate ............... 193 0 0 All Saiuts, Ennismore-gardens ............... 163 0 0 Hampstead Synagogue .................. 146 0 0 New West End Synagogue ............... 130 0 0 St. Stephen’s, Westbourne Park ......... 120 0 0 Central Synagogue ..................... 120 0 0 St. Bartholomew’s, Sydenham ............... 106 0 0 Bayswater Synagogue .................. 102 0 0 St. John’s Wood Synagogue ............... 77 0 0 St. John’s Wood Presbyterian Church ............ 69 0 0 Victoria Park Christian Evidence Association ......... 60 0 0 lioly Trinity, Wandsworth ................ 60 0 0 Barking Parish Church and :VTissions ............ 55 0 0 "F." ..................... 50 0 0 Trinity Church, Hampstead ......... 47 0 0 St. Saviour’s, Brixton-bill .................. 41 0 0 St. Peter’s, Streatham .................. 38 0 0 St. James’s, Ilolloway ................ 36 0 0 Wilmington Parish Church ......... 33 0 0 St. John’s, Hillingdon, with Evelyn’s School Chapel .. 32 0 0 I St.. Saviour’s, Padrlington .................. 31 0 0 Stoke Newington Synagogue ............... 31 0 0 St. Andrew’s by the Wardrobe .............. 29 0 0 South Hackney Synagogue and Religion Classes ...... 28 0 0 Epping Parish Church and All Saints’ ............ 28 0 0 AT a meeting of the Council of the Metropolitan Hospital Sunday Fund, held at the Mansion House on July 27th, under the p"esidency of the Lord Mayor, it was announced that the total sum available for distribution for the present year is 663,000. This sum will be distributed between 166 hospitals and institutions, 59 dispensaries, and 30 nursing associations. UNIVERSITY OF OXFORD.—Radcliffe Travelling Fellonship, 1911: An examination for a Fellowship of the annual value of .6200, and tenable for three years, will be held in Hilary term, 1911. Candidates should make appli- cation to "The Radcliffe Examiners, Radcliffe Library, Uni- versity Museum," from whom all particulars can be obtained. —Radcliffe Prize, 1910-11 : The next award for the Radcliffe prize will be in the year 1911. The prize, which is of the value of £50, is awarded by the Master and Fellows of University College every second year for research in any I branch of medical science comprised under the following heads: Human anatomy, physiology, pharmacology, path- I ology, medicine, surgery, obstetrics, gynaecology, forensic medicine, hygiene. The prize is open to all graduates of the University who shall have proceeded or shall be proceeding to a medical degree in the University. Candidates must not have exceeded 12 years from the date of passing the last examination for the degree of B.A., and must not, at the date of application, be Fellows on the foundation of Dr. John Radcliffe. Candidates must send in their memoirs to the University Registry on or before the first day of December, 1910. The award will be made in March, 1911. No memoir for which any university prize has already been awarded is admitted to competition for the Radcliffe prize ; and the prize will not he awarded more than once to the same candidate.—Rolleston Memorial Prize, 1912: This prize, which is of the value of about £60, will be awarded in Easter or Trinity term, 1912. The prize is open to such members of the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge as will not have exceeded 10 years from the date of their matriculation on March 31st, 1912, and is to be awarded for original research in any subject comprised under the following heads : Animal and vegetable morphology, physiology and pathology, and anthropology, to be selected by the candidates themselves. Candidates wishing to compete are requested to forward their memoirs to the Registrar of the University of Oxford before March 31st, 1912. The memoirs should be inscribed "Rolleston Memorial Essay " and should each bear the name and address of the author. They may be printed or in manuscript, memoirs already published being admitted to the competition. Looking Back. FROM THE LANCET, SATURDAY, July 28th, 1832 THE EXPERIMENTS OF FARADAY, NOBILI, AND ANTINORI, ON A NEW CLASS OF ELECTRO-DYNAMIC PHENOMENA. THE late discoveries of our distinguished countryman Dr. Faraday in this important branch of physics, has excited the attention of natural philosophers in every part of Europe, and his experiments have been successfully repeated and modified by many of his contemporary savans. Amongst other exotic inquirers, Signori Nobili and Antinori of Florence, who derived their first knowledge of Dr. Faraday’s pursuits from a short notice given by M. Hachette to the Academy of Sciences at Paris, and afterwards published in "Le Temps" journal, are the most distinguished. The researches of Nobili and Antinori were published in the Antologia, No. 131, and were translated into the Philo- sophical Magazine of June last. This paper has been extracted by Dr. Faraday, and printed, with annotations, for private circulation, but as the reputation of this justly eminent chemist is now a sort of national property, we shall make no apology for devoting a portion of our pages in justification of his claims to these important discoveries. It has been said, and the assertion has been industriously spread by certain liberal and candid persons, that the two Italian physicians were the originators of the inquiry, but we are happy to observe, that those gentlemen do justice to the merit of our countryman, and frankly declare, that their particular opinions do not in any way diminish the intrinsic merit of Mr. Faraday’s discovery. It is one of the most beautiful of our time, whether it be con- sidered in itself for the largeness of the vacancy it serves to fill, or for the light it throws over the various theories, and especially that of the magnetism of rotation." The following is the notice which appeared in "Le Temps," and which being translated into several languages, has served as the text of all subsequent papers on magnetic electricity. ’’ The memoir of Mr. Faraday is divided into four parts. In the first, entitled Induction of Voltaic Electricity, is found the following important fact, that a voltaic current which traverses a metallic wire, produces another current in a neighbouring wire ; that the second current is in a direction contrary to the first, and continues but for a moment ; that if the producing current is removed, a second current is manifested in the wire submitted to its action, contrary to that which was first formed in it, i e. in the same direction as the producing current. " The second part of the memoir treats of electric currents produced by the magnets. On causing helices to approach to magnets, Mr. Faraday has produced electric currents ; on removing the spirals, currents in the contrary direction were formed. These currents act powerfully on the galvano- meter ; pass, though feebly, through brine and other solutions, and in a particular case, Mr. Faraday has obtained a spark. Hence it follows, that this philosopher has, by using a magnet only, produced the electric currents contemplated by M. Ampere. " The third part of the memoir is relative to a particular electric state, which Mr. Faraday calls electro-tonic state." (Vide LANCET, Nos. 456, 457, 458.) "The fourth part speaks of the experiment, not less curious than extraordinary, of M. Arago, which consists, as is known, in making a magnetic needle revolve under the in- fluence of a rotatory metallic disc, and rioe versa. Mr. Faraday considers this phenomenon as intimately connected with that of the magnetic rotation, which he had the good fortune to discover about ten years ago. He has ascertained, that by the rotation of the metallic disc under the influence of a magnet, there may be formed electric currents in the direction of the rays of the disc, in sufficient number to render the disc a new electrical machine." 1 1 Excerpt only. We have not the space to spare to transcribe the remaining eight columns of this interesting chapter in the early history of the dynamo.

FROM THE LANCET, SATURDAY, July 28th, 1832

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Page 1: FROM THE LANCET, SATURDAY, July 28th, 1832

331

METROPOLITAN HOSPITAL SUNDAYFUND.- I

UP to Thursday morning, July 28th, about .663,000, whichincludes f.24,584 from the executors of the late Mr. GeorgeHerring, had been received at the Mansion House. Amongthe additional church collections are :—

;&bgr; s. d.St. Mary Abbot’s, Kensington ............... 494 0 0

(St. Mary Abbot’s..S348 ; St. Paul’s, Vicarage Gate, 289 ;Christ Church, Victoria-road, ,e57)

Holy Trinity, Sloane-street .................. 465 0 0West London Synagogue .................. 324 0 0St. Paul’s, Iinightsbriige .................. 272 0 0Great Synagogue ..................... 239 0 0St..Iarys,Bryani:ton-squate ............... 193 0 0All Saiuts, Ennismore-gardens ............... 163 0 0Hampstead Synagogue .................. 146 0 0New West End Synagogue ............... 130 0 0St. Stephen’s, Westbourne Park ......... 120 0 0Central Synagogue ..................... 120 0 0St. Bartholomew’s, Sydenham ............... 106 0 0Bayswater Synagogue .................. 102 0 0St. John’s Wood Synagogue ............... 77 0 0St. John’s Wood Presbyterian Church ............ 69 0 0Victoria Park Christian Evidence Association ......... 60 0 0lioly Trinity, Wandsworth ................ 60 0 0Barking Parish Church and :VTissions ............ 55 0 0"F." ..................... 50 0 0Trinity Church, Hampstead ......... 47 0 0St. Saviour’s, Brixton-bill .................. 41 0 0St. Peter’s, Streatham .................. 38 0 0St. James’s, Ilolloway ................ 36 0 0Wilmington Parish Church ......... 33 0 0 St. John’s, Hillingdon, with Evelyn’s School Chapel .. 32 0 0 ISt.. Saviour’s, Padrlington .................. 31 0 0Stoke Newington Synagogue ............... 31 0 0St. Andrew’s by the Wardrobe .............. 29 0 0South Hackney Synagogue and Religion Classes ...... 28 0 0Epping Parish Church and All Saints’ ............ 28 0 0

AT a meeting of the Council of the Metropolitan HospitalSunday Fund, held at the Mansion House on July 27th,under the p"esidency of the Lord Mayor, it was announcedthat the total sum available for distribution for the presentyear is 663,000. This sum will be distributed between 166hospitals and institutions, 59 dispensaries, and 30 nursingassociations.

UNIVERSITY OF OXFORD.—Radcliffe TravellingFellonship, 1911: An examination for a Fellowship of theannual value of .6200, and tenable for three years, will beheld in Hilary term, 1911. Candidates should make appli-cation to "The Radcliffe Examiners, Radcliffe Library, Uni-versity Museum," from whom all particulars can be obtained.—Radcliffe Prize, 1910-11 : The next award for the Radcliffeprize will be in the year 1911. The prize, which is of thevalue of £50, is awarded by the Master and Fellows of

University College every second year for research in any Ibranch of medical science comprised under the followingheads: Human anatomy, physiology, pharmacology, path- Iology, medicine, surgery, obstetrics, gynaecology, forensicmedicine, hygiene. The prize is open to all graduates of theUniversity who shall have proceeded or shall be proceedingto a medical degree in the University. Candidates mustnot have exceeded 12 years from the date of passing the lastexamination for the degree of B.A., and must not, at thedate of application, be Fellows on the foundation of Dr.John Radcliffe. Candidates must send in their memoirs tothe University Registry on or before the first day of December,1910. The award will be made in March, 1911. No memoirfor which any university prize has already been awarded isadmitted to competition for the Radcliffe prize ; and theprize will not he awarded more than once to the samecandidate.—Rolleston Memorial Prize, 1912: This prize,which is of the value of about £60, will be awarded in Easteror Trinity term, 1912. The prize is open to such members of the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge as will not haveexceeded 10 years from the date of their matriculation onMarch 31st, 1912, and is to be awarded for original researchin any subject comprised under the following heads : Animaland vegetable morphology, physiology and pathology, andanthropology, to be selected by the candidates themselves.Candidates wishing to compete are requested to forward theirmemoirs to the Registrar of the University of Oxford beforeMarch 31st, 1912. The memoirs should be inscribed"Rolleston Memorial Essay " and should each bear thename and address of the author. They may be printed orin manuscript, memoirs already published being admitted tothe competition.

Looking Back.FROM

THE LANCET, SATURDAY, July 28th, 1832

THE EXPERIMENTSOF

FARADAY, NOBILI, AND ANTINORI,ON A NEW CLASS OF

ELECTRO-DYNAMIC PHENOMENA.

THE late discoveries of our distinguished countryman Dr.Faraday in this important branch of physics, has excited theattention of natural philosophers in every part of Europe,and his experiments have been successfully repeated andmodified by many of his contemporary savans. Amongstother exotic inquirers, Signori Nobili and Antinori ofFlorence, who derived their first knowledge of Dr. Faraday’spursuits from a short notice given by M. Hachette to theAcademy of Sciences at Paris, and afterwards published in"Le Temps" journal, are the most distinguished. Theresearches of Nobili and Antinori were published in theAntologia, No. 131, and were translated into the Philo-

sophical Magazine of June last. This paper has beenextracted by Dr. Faraday, and printed, with annotations, forprivate circulation, but as the reputation of this justlyeminent chemist is now a sort of national property, we shallmake no apology for devoting a portion of our pages in

justification of his claims to these important discoveries. Ithas been said, and the assertion has been industriouslyspread by certain liberal and candid persons, that the twoItalian physicians were the originators of the inquiry,but we are happy to observe, that those gentlemen dojustice to the merit of our countryman, and frankly declare,that their particular opinions do not in any waydiminish the intrinsic merit of Mr. Faraday’s discovery. Itis one of the most beautiful of our time, whether it be con-sidered in itself for the largeness of the vacancy it serves tofill, or for the light it throws over the various theories, andespecially that of the magnetism of rotation." The followingis the notice which appeared in "Le Temps," and whichbeing translated into several languages, has served as thetext of all subsequent papers on magnetic electricity.

’’ The memoir of Mr. Faraday is divided into four parts.In the first, entitled Induction of Voltaic Electricity, is foundthe following important fact, that a voltaic current whichtraverses a metallic wire, produces another current in a

neighbouring wire ; that the second current is in a directioncontrary to the first, and continues but for a moment ; thatif the producing current is removed, a second current is

manifested in the wire submitted to its action, contrary tothat which was first formed in it, i e. in the same direction asthe producing current.

" The second part of the memoir treats of electric currentsproduced by the magnets. On causing helices to approachto magnets, Mr. Faraday has produced electric currents ; onremoving the spirals, currents in the contrary direction wereformed. These currents act powerfully on the galvano-meter ; pass, though feebly, through brine and othersolutions, and in a particular case, Mr. Faraday hasobtained a spark. Hence it follows, that this philosopherhas, by using a magnet only, produced the electric currentscontemplated by M. Ampere.

" The third part of the memoir is relative to a particularelectric state, which Mr. Faraday calls electro-tonic state."(Vide LANCET, Nos. 456, 457, 458.)"The fourth part speaks of the experiment, not less

curious than extraordinary, of M. Arago, which consists, asis known, in making a magnetic needle revolve under the in-fluence of a rotatory metallic disc, and rioe versa. Mr. Faradayconsiders this phenomenon as intimately connected with thatof the magnetic rotation, which he had the good fortune todiscover about ten years ago. He has ascertained, that bythe rotation of the metallic disc under the influence of a

magnet, there may be formed electric currents in the directionof the rays of the disc, in sufficient number to render thedisc a new electrical machine." 1

1 Excerpt only. We have not the space to spare to transcribe theremaining eight columns of this interesting chapter in the early historyof the dynamo.