Food Around the World - Kid World Citizen - Activities viewFood Around the World Project Overview The Food Around the World project will introduce students to different aspects of food, such as what different types of food children eat around the world, where food comes from, the global food

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Food Around the World

Food Around the World

Project Overview

The Food Around the World project will introduce students to different aspects of food, such as what different types of food children eat around the world, where food comes from, the global food crisis, and how we can help end the global food crisis by growing our own food and giving to those in need. In Week 1, students will explore what types of food children eat around the world. They will learn about what kinds of food children from other countries eat for breakfast and what their school lunches look and taste like. They will compare and contrast these meals with our meals in the United States and video chat with a class in another country to hear first hand about the dishes that they eat. In Week 2, students will discover where their food comes from. They will learn about the process that food travels on to go from a tiny seed to their tables, hear from local farmers, and map which countries their produce comes from. This week will facilitate their global competence through learning about the long process that our food goes through and mapping on a world map where their produce originally comes from. In Week 3, students will learn about the global food crisis. The global food crisis is that one in seven people in the world are hungry, yet there is enough food to feed everyone. (www.fastcoexist.com) Students will discover that if we do not find more sustainable practices for growing and consuming food soon, that there will not be enough food for everyone in the world in 2050. (www.fastcoexist.com) Students will be taught about want and waste, brainstorm ideas of how we can end the global food crisis, and design posters explaining the problem and urging others to get involved in ending the global food crisis. In Week 4, students will plant their own food. Students will learn the value of planting their own food - that it reduces waste, is fresher, and cuts down on the energy and costs of processing and shipping produce from other countries. They will discover the materials needed to grow crops, plant seeds in a pot, and begin to watch their food grow. Students will share their classroom garden on the ANIA Childrens Land Project website and see other classroom gardens students have created throughout the world. In Week 5, students will participate in two projects to help those who are hungry. Students will make and fill bags to give to the local food bank and hold an Empty Bowls event at the school to raise money to give to the local food bank. They will learn how the small task of giving food to those in need can make a big impact in ending world hunger.

Targeted Grade Level(s)

2nd Grade

Project Length

5 Weeks

Project Learning Goals

Students will be able to:

know what kinds of foods children eat around the world.

discern where the food they eat comes from and understand the process it goes through to get from a seed to their tables.

understand the global food crisis and how that impacts them and others.

plant a classroom garden.

give to those in need of food.

Essential Questions

How are the foods that children around the world eat similar and different to what we eat in the United States? Why?

How does knowing where our food comes from influence what we eat?

How will the global food crisis affect you and others in the future?

Why should we plant a classroom garden? How does a classroom garden positively impact our lives and the globe?

How can we make a difference in the lives of those who are hungry?

Enduring Understandings

Students will understand:

that children around the world eat different types of food and foods cooked in different ways than students in the United States.

the detailed process that food goes through from seed to table and that the produce they buy in the grocery store may come from countries all over the world.

the global food crisis, how it impacts people now, and how it will impact people in the future if more sustainable practices are not implemented.

that planting a classroom garden positively impacts themselves and the globe by reducing waste and lowering energy costs that come from shipping and processing foods from other countries.

that they can make a difference in the lives of those who are hungry in our community by making and filling bags to give to the local food bank and holding an Empty Bowls event.

National and State Standards

Culture:

2.C.2.1 - Explain how artistic expressions of diverse cultures contribute to the community (i.e. stories, art, music, food, etc.)

2.C.2.3 - Exemplify respect and appropriate social skills needed for working with diverse groups.

Speaking and Listening:

SL.2.1 - Participate in collaborative conversations with diverse partners about grade 2 topics and texts with peers and adults in small and larger groups.

SL.2.2 - Recount or describe key ideas or details from a text read aloud or information presented orally or through other media.

Writing:

W.2.1 - Write opinion pieces in which they introduce the topic or book they are writing about, state an opinion, supply reasons that support the opinion, use linking words (e.g., because, and, also) to connect opinion and reasons, and provide a concluding statement or section.

W.2.2 - Write informative/explanatory texts in which they introduce a topic, use facts and definitions to develop points, and provide a concluding statement or section.

ICT Integration

Technology will be used in several ways throughout the five week implementation of this project. First, the computer and the Smart Board will be used to display the charts, videos, and other information used throughout the lessons. Second, students will video chat online with a class from another country to discuss the different types of foods they eat. Lastly, students will post pictures from their garden on the ANIA Childrens Land Project website. Students will use iPads to take pictures and post them to the website.

Proposed Calendar of Activities and Exchanges

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Week 1: Food Around the World

Introduce food around the world by having students reflect on the different types of food they eat for lunch. Record this information.

Read the book Whats for Lunch by Andrea Curtis. Discuss similarities and differences between foods that US students eat and the foods that international students eat. Record on a graphic organizer.

Display and discuss the charts School Lunch around the World and 20 Breakfasts from around the World. Have students choose a country they would like to visit during breakfast or lunch and write about their experiences.

With the help of parent volunteers, create several dishes that children typically eat for breakfast or lunch around the world. Have the students sample these dishes and write an opinion piece on their favorite dish.

Video chat with a classroom in another country about the types of foods they eat. What do they eat for lunch? How does the process of school lunch work in their country? (This video chat will need to be planned well in advance.)

Week 2: Where does our Food Come From?

Introduce where our food comes from by engaging students in a conversation about where they believe our food comes from. Record their ideas on a KWL chart. Instruct students to bring in produce labels by Thursday and send a note home to parents.

Watch the video Where Does Our Food Come From? Tomatoes. Explain to students that food comes from farms all around the world. Display the chart Getting Food from the Farm to your Table. Explain the process that food travels along to get from farms to our homes.

Have local farmers (my brother and brother-in-law) come into the classroom and share about their jobs as farmers. Have them explain what they do as farmers, how food goes from a tiny seed to a full grown crop, and the process that food goes through to get from the farm to our homes. Provide time for questions and answers.

Map students produce labels on a large map of the world. Have the students tell what fruits and vegetables the labels came from. Make a list on the board of different types of fruits and vegetables and where they came from. Ask students if they recognize any patterns. Remind students that it is important to buy food locally as it supports our local economy and the produce is fresher; however, at different times of the year, our produce may come from different areas around the world because of the climate needed for growing them.

Divide students into groups of 5 or 6. Instruct each group to pick a fruit or vegetable of their choice and illustrate the journey it goes on using drama. Have the students work together with their groups to develop a short skit that illustrates the journey that food takes. Allow the students to display their learning by performing their skits for their peers. Complete the L part of the KWL chart to record student learning.

Week 3: The Global Food Crisis

Introduce students to the global food crisis by showing them the videos Food and You parts 1-3. Explain that the world has enough food to feed everyone, yet 1 in 7 people are hungry. Have students share why they think this is happening. Record their ideas on a chart.

Display the chart Two Sides of the Food Crisis. Discuss the first side of the food crisis - Want. Discuss the factors that are causing people around the world to be hungry.

Display the chart Two Sides of the Food Crisis. Discuss the second side - Waste. Ask