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  • Food and DrinkMuch of Cumbrias traditionally grown foods have been influenced by the constraints of what can be grown given the regions climate,topography, geology and associated soil types. Sheep were selected thatcould survive harsh conditions. Oats and barley were the main arablecrops and many place names reflect these early forms of cultivation: forinstance, Haverthwaite (clearing where oats grew), Biggland (landwhere barley grew). Damsons, by contrast, prefer the calcareous andsheltered environment of the Lyth and Winster valleys.

    Self-sufficiency drove the need to keep foodstuffs for as long as possible,hence butter (and to a lesser extent, cheese) was made to use up surplus milk. Meats were hung and salted to prolong their keeping life (Cumberland hams and bacons are still much in evidence today) andpreserving fruit and vegetables in the form of jams, chutneys and relisheswas another method of extending shelf-life.

    The import of rum and spices into Whitehaven during the 18th centuryled to the incorporation of new flavourings into Cumbrian foods. Blackpepper became an essential ingredient in the making of Cumberlandsausage. Ginger, nutmeg and other spices were used to impart distinctnew flavours to baking. Rum was added as a preservative and sweetener in dishes such as Sweet Lamb Pie and Rum Nicky.

    In recent years Cumbria has excelled as a livestock exporting county and is now also developing a reputation for high quality local food. Farmersmarkets flourish, as do food festivals and there is now an extensivenetwork of farm shops. Increasingly, local food is found on the menu inrestaurants, hotels, pubs and B&Bs as local farmers and growers seek toadd value to their products.

    For more information on Cumbrias Food & Drink see Annette Gibbonsbook Home Grown in Cumbria. For local producers, visit www.golakes.co.uk,www.discovercumbria.net, www.madeincumbria.co.ukorwww.fellsanddales.org.uk.

    ABCDEFGH

    JKLMNOPQR

    T

    WXYZ

    UV

    S

    What images do the Cumbrian Fells and Dales bring to mind mountainous scenery, ribbon lakes, grassy fells, exposedlimestone pavements? Or is it lesser known features, such askest banks, lime kilns, bobbin mills, Rough Fell sheep, wilddaffodils, damson trees, spinning galleries or bee boles?

    The ABC technique was developed by Common Ground to help people identify the features they find special anddistinctive in their neighbourhoods whether buildingmaterials, animal breeds, industrial legacies, place names,local traditions, or whatever they choose. Some features mayseem ordinary and familiar, but they often occur becausehumans have adapted their physical environment in order tosurvive. This has given rise to a rich tapestry of natural andman-made features that together make up the essentialcharacter of any given area.

    This ABC series has been developed in conjunction withvarious interest groups, but local people can also use thetechnique to promote local distinctiveness. If you areinterested in developing your own ABC guide, please visitthe LEADER+ website (www.fellsanddales.org.uk) orCommon Ground (www.england-in-particular.info) for more details.

    AApple

    day

    BButter

    CCumberland

    sausage

    DDamsons

    EEggs

    FFarmermarkets

    GGingerbread

    HHoney

    Icecream

    JJams

    KKeswickcodlin

    LLamb

    MMilk

    NNutmeg

    OOrganic

    food

    PPies &

    puddings

    QQuiggins

    RRealale

    SSticky toffee

    puddings

    TTatiePot

    WWindermere

    char

    XXmasfoods

    YYoghurts

    ZZest

    UUnsmoked

    (and smoked) hams and bacons

    VVegetables

    F O O D A N D D R I N K

    A74(M)

    M6

    M6

    M6

    37

    38

    39

    41

    40

    42

    43

    44

    36

    34

    35

    S C O T L A N D

    C U M B R I A

    Carlisle

    LancasterMorecambe

    Broughton in FurnessSedbergh

    Brough

    Settle

    Kirkby Lonsdale

    Kirkby Stephen

    Alston

    Keswick

    Cockermouth

    Whitehaven

    Egremont

    Workington

    Ambleside

    Kendal

    Penrith

    Ulverston

    Carnforth

    Maryport

    A590

    A592

    A592A5091

    A592

    A591 A6

    A591

    A66

    A6

    N o r t h u m b e r l a n d

    C o u n t y D u r h a m

    L a n c a s h i r e

    Y o r k s h i r e

    A686

    A66A66

    A596 A595

    A595 A685

    A684

    A65

    A65 Barrow in Furness

    Windermere

    Grasmere

    Silloth

    This project is being part financed by the European AgricultureGuidance and Guarantee Fund of the European Union and theDepartment for Environment Food and Rural Affairs throughthe Cumbria Fells & Dales LEADER+ Programme.

    Crown copyright 2002. All rights reserved. Licence number 100042269

    Produced by Anna Gray at Voluntary ActionCumbria.Designed by Andrew Lathwell Design Ltd.Printed by Reeds of Penrith, 2007.Images supplied by Andrew Lathwell, Ivan Day, Juliet Whitworth, Brian Sherwen,Ted Bowness, Common Ground andVoluntary Action Cumbria.

    LEADER+(Cumbria Fells & Dales)The Old Stables, Redhills,Penrith, Cumbria CA11 0DT.Tel: 01768 869533

    [email protected]g.uk www.fellsanddales.org.ukFells and Dales LEADER+ Programme is based at Voluntary Action Cumbria, a company limited by guarantee.

    Charity No 1080875. Company No. 3957858

    This is one of a series of ABCguides being produced byLEADER+ (Cumbria Fells &Dales) to promote the area andits local products.

    For those who are visuallyimpaired an enlarged PDFversion (text only) is availablefrom the website.Whilst every effort has been made to ensurethat the content of this leaflet is accurate andup-to-date at the time of printing, no liabilitycan be accepted for any errors, omissions ormisrepresentations of fact contained herein.

    Andrew Lathwell Design Limited.

    Text Voluntary Action Cumbria.

    _ _ _ _ q g

  • Apple DayAn annual event at Acorn Bank(near Temple Sowerby) cookery demonstrations, appleidentification, apple games,and advice on growing andpruning apple trees.

    A Apple Day

    Butter

    DamsonsGrown locally in the damsonorchards of the Lyth Valley.Damsons are highly adaptableand can be made into jams andchutneys or added to gin, sweetpuddings, ice cream, meat piesand even beer!

    C

    EggsFresh, wholesome eggs locallyproduced from free-rangehens, geese, turkeys and ducks.

    E

    Damsons

    Cumberland sausage

    Farmers MarketsOver 13 markets offering agreat variety of foods andcrafts, all produced by localfarmers, growers, producersand artisan crafts people.

    F Farmers markets

    GingerbreadOats combined with butter,spices, rum and unrefinedsugar; most notably made bySarah Nelson of Grasmere.

    G Gingerbread

    Ice creamA growing number of dairy farms are adding value to their milkby opening ice cream parlours.

    HoneyLocally produced and sold atfarmers markets, farm shopsor directly by the beekeeper.The best Cumbrian honey issaid to come from the heather-clad moors.

    H

    JamsAdding value to local apples,damsons and other hedgerowfruits.

    Juices and syrups Freshly pressed from locallysourced apples and damsons.

    J

    Ice Cream

    Honey

    Eggs

    LambTasty meat from Herdwick,Rough Fell and Swaledale sheep.

    Lamplugh puddingMulled ale mixed with brownsugar, raisins and lemon, andthickened with porridge oatsand biscuits.

    L

    Keswick codlinA famous variety of cookingapple, originally found on arubbish tip at Gleaston Castleand cultivated by a nurserymanin Keswick.

    K

    Milk Cumbria is one of the largestmilk fields in the UK, withmuch processed locally intocheese and whey products.Over 10 different varieties ofcheese are made in the countyusing milk from cows, ewesand goats.

    M

    Lamb

    Keswick Codlin

    QuigginsThe first makers of Kendalmintcake in 1880, followed byWilsons, Romneys andWipers.

    Q Quiggins

    Real aleBrewed by over 22 local micro-breweries, real ale is making astrong comeback in Cumbria.

    Rum butterTraditionally served to markthe arrival of a new baby.

    R Real ale

    Tatie PotLocal dish made with muttonand black pudding, and toppedwith thinly sliced potatoes.

    T

    Sticky toffee puddingThe stickiest of all puddings,created in Cumbria and nowsold all over the world.

    S

    U

    Tatie pot

    Sticky toffee pudding

    Jams

    Organic foodsA huge array of organic foodscan be sourced locally frommeats and milk to salads andvegetables.

    O

    N

    Pies and puddingsFrom savoury meat pies to sweetapple puddings, all encased indelicious home-made pastry!

    Potted shrimps Traditional recipe made fromlocal brown shrimps cooked in butter and potted into small dishes.

    P

    Organic foods

    Nutmeg

    Pies & puddings

    VegetablesLocally grown vegetables can be sourced at most farmersmarkets and farm shops, orthrough organic box schemes.

    V Vegetables

    W Windermere char

    YoghurtA number of Cumbrian dairy farms are currentlyinvestigating producingyoghurts from their own milk.

    X

    ZestA vital ingredient in allculinary enterprises!

    Z

    Yoghurt

    Xmas food

    ZestUnsmoked & smokedhams and baconsMilk

    Xmas food Sweet Pie (mutton mixed withrum, dried fruit, brown sugarand spices, packed into raisedpie cases) could be kept forseveral months after it wasbaked.

    One of a series of alphabetical guides to the distinctive character of the

    Fells & Dales of Cumbria.

    For more information on CumbriasFood & Drink and local producers, visit

    www.golakes.co.uk,www.discovercumbria.net orwww.madeincumbria.co.uk

    B

    D Y

    Butt