1
340 REVIEWS these diffusion agencies. He sees his market approach as complementary to, rather than a substitute for, Hagerstrand’s concept of diffusion as a learning process by individuals. His argument is carefully and securely developed through a large number of case studies drawn from western and modernizing societies, case studies of diffusion that range from passion fruit and custom-blended fertilizer to the Planned Parenthood Affiliate and SHU-PAK, the latter being a one man solid-waste collecting vehicle. Altogether. it is a book fairly described as burdened with concepts and analyses, but its heavy conceptual reliance on modern marketing techniques will surely limit the extent to which historical geographers can apply its undoubtedly useful conclusions to their stock-in-trade problems. IEUAN GWYNNED JONES, Explorations and Explanations: Essays in the Social History of Victorian Wales (Llandysul : Gwasg Gomer, 1981. Pp. 338. 69.75) Explorations and Explanations reprints essays on the social history of Victorian Wales by Ieuan Gwynned Jones, though the book is noticeably coy about when (if not where) the essays were first published. Despite the title’s expansive opening phrase, its contents are quite sharply focused. Some chapters deal with the character of Welsh non-con- formity as revealed by the 1851 census on religious observance. Others with crucial county and borough elections that took place during the 1860s. Still others try to set these themes in their wider context. But although prescribed in its thematic coverage, the book does succeed in showing just how significant these patterns and events were for the history of nineteenth-century Wales. Jones’ task is greatly helped by his fine turn of phrase. It is also helped by his searching style of discussion, with little being taken for granted and many valuable insights being offered. Indeed, I found the division of the book into exploratory and explanatory sections unnecessary, since all chapters contain some explanatory discussion, albeit at different scales. IAN G. LAYTON, The Evohrtion of Upper Norrland’s Ports and Loading Places 1150-1976 (Umea: University of Umea, Department of Geography, 1981. Pp. xv+358) This is a splendidly researched monograph. Its author has assembled and analysed a vast array of material on the port system and trading activity of Upper Norrland 1750- 1976. The way he has tabulated or graphed his data on the “life-line” of the various ports is exemplary. Whilst a well-supported and closely argued work, it is far from being inward looking in its approach. Layton has set his findings not only alongside current thinking on the methodology of historical geography, but also, beside every relevant concept which he can muster on port or transport development. The five stage model which he himself offers is more elaborate than those of the Taafe-Morrill-Gould-type since it allows for developments in transport technology as well as for greater con- nectivity. The stress on developing technology occurs throughout the study, with larger ships, improved ice-breaking techniques, railway construction and more productive saw mills all having their effect on port activity. The port system is seen as experiencing an initial phase of proliferation and then a later phase of thinning as the greatly increased trading flows favoured fewer and better equipped ports. University College of Wales, Aberyst~vyth ROBERTA. DODGSHON

Explorations and explanations: Essays in the social history of Victorian Wales

Embed Size (px)

Citation preview

340 REVIEWS

these diffusion agencies. He sees his market approach as complementary to, rather than a substitute for, Hagerstrand’s concept of diffusion as a learning process by individuals. His argument is carefully and securely developed through a large number of case studies drawn from western and modernizing societies, case studies of diffusion that range from passion fruit and custom-blended fertilizer to the Planned Parenthood Affiliate and SHU-PAK, the latter being a one man solid-waste collecting vehicle. Altogether. it is a

book fairly described as burdened with concepts and analyses, but its heavy conceptual reliance on modern marketing techniques will surely limit the extent to which historical geographers can apply its undoubtedly useful conclusions to their stock-in-trade problems.

IEUAN GWYNNED JONES, Explorations and Explanations: Essays in the Social History of Victorian Wales (Llandysul : Gwasg Gomer, 1981. Pp. 338. 69.75)

Explorations and Explanations reprints essays on the social history of Victorian Wales by Ieuan Gwynned Jones, though the book is noticeably coy about when (if not where) the essays were first published. Despite the title’s expansive opening phrase, its contents are quite sharply focused. Some chapters deal with the character of Welsh non-con- formity as revealed by the 1851 census on religious observance. Others with crucial county and borough elections that took place during the 1860s. Still others try to set these themes in their wider context. But although prescribed in its thematic coverage, the book does succeed in showing just how significant these patterns and events were for the history of nineteenth-century Wales. Jones’ task is greatly helped by his fine turn of phrase. It is also helped by his searching style of discussion, with little being taken for granted and many valuable insights being offered. Indeed, I found the division of the book into exploratory and explanatory sections unnecessary, since all chapters contain some explanatory discussion, albeit at different scales.

IAN G. LAYTON, The Evohrtion of Upper Norrland’s Ports and Loading Places 1150-1976 (Umea: University of Umea, Department of Geography, 1981. Pp. xv+358)

This is a splendidly researched monograph. Its author has assembled and analysed a vast array of material on the port system and trading activity of Upper Norrland 1750- 1976. The way he has tabulated or graphed his data on the “life-line” of the various ports is exemplary. Whilst a well-supported and closely argued work, it is far from being inward looking in its approach. Layton has set his findings not only alongside current thinking on the methodology of historical geography, but also, beside every relevant concept which he can muster on port or transport development. The five stage model which he himself offers is more elaborate than those of the Taafe-Morrill-Gould-type since it allows for developments in transport technology as well as for greater con- nectivity. The stress on developing technology occurs throughout the study, with larger ships, improved ice-breaking techniques, railway construction and more productive saw mills all having their effect on port activity. The port system is seen as experiencing an initial phase of proliferation and then a later phase of thinning as the greatly increased trading flows favoured fewer and better equipped ports.

University College of Wales, Aberyst~vyth ROBERT A. DODGSHON