EVOLVING STRATEGIES EVOLVING VIRUS INFECTIOUS BRONCHITIS: EVOLVING STRATEGIES FOR AN EVOLVING VIRUS

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  • H I G H L I G H T S O F A R O U N D T A B L E D I S C U S S I O N POULTRY H E A L T H T O D A Y ®

    E V O LV I N G S T R AT E G I E S

    F O R A N E V O LV I N G V I R U S

    I N F E C T I O U S B R O N C H I T I S :

    A U G U S T 2 0 1 9 • W A S H I N G T O N , D C

  • I N F E C T I O U S B R O N C H I T I S : E V O L V I N G S T R A T E G I E S F O R A N E V O L V I N G V I R U S

    W E LC O M E

    The evolution of infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) is a continuing challenge for poultry producers and veterinarians. In broilers, this highly infectious coronavirus can present in its

    traditional form as respiratory disease, predisposing birds to secondary bacterial infections.

    Relatively newer on the scene are potentially deadly nephropathogenic IBV strains. In any form,

    IBV impairs animal welfare and is an important source of economic loss for poultry producers.

    Vaccination is key to IBV control. Although homologous vaccines are considered to be the

    most effective, development of a new vaccine for every new IBV strain that emerges is difficult

    to impossible. Finding an effective existing vaccine or combination of vaccines that will

    cross-protect is a worthwhile venture, but there’s no guarantee of success.

    Zoetis recently hosted a roundtable featuring renowned IBV experts as well as practitioners

    who shared their knowledge about IBV. These proceedings are highlights from the conversation

    and are provided with the hope they will help the industry achieve better control of IBV,

    improve animal welfare and minimize IBV’s financial burden.

    JON SCHAEFFER, DVM, PHD

    Director, Poultry Technical Services, Zoetis

    jon.schaeffer@zoetis.com

    zoetisus.com/foodsafety

    Sponsored by

  • H I G H L I G H T S O F A R O U N D T A B L E D I S C U S S I O N POULTRY H E A L T H T O D A Y ®

    TA B L E O F C O N T E N T S

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    I B V T R E N D S . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

    I B V D E T E C T I O N . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

    I B V I N B R O I L E R B R E E D E R S . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

    I B V A N D I M M U N I T Y . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

    I M P A C T O F N O A N T I B I O T I C S E V E R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

    I B V E V O L U T I O N A N D S P R E A D . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

    R O L E O F I B V V A C C I N A T I O N . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

    V A C C I N A T I O N S T R A T E G I E S . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

    I B V C R O S S  P R O T E C T I O N . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

    V A C C I N A T I O N O F B R O I L E R B R E E D E R S . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

    I B V A N D N E W C A S T L E D I S E A S E P R O T E C T I O N . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

    H O W M A N Y I B V V A C C I N E S E R O T Y P E S ? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

    V A C C I N E A P P L I C A T I O N P I T F A L L S . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

    M I N I M I Z I N G V A C C I N E R E A C T I O N S . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

    I B V A R K A N S A S C O N U N D R U M . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

    R E F L E C T I O N S . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

    IBV KEY: In conversation, poultry health specialists often use abbreviated terms when describing long, numeric names of IBV serotypes. Here’s a key to the ones used in this discussion:

    DMV/1639 = IBV Delmarva 1639 • GA08 = IBV Georgia 08 • GA13 = IBV Georgia 13 • GA98 = IBV Georgia 98 • PA/1220 = IBV Pennsylvania 1220

  • I N F E C T I O U S B R O N C H I T I S : E V O L V I N G S T R A T E G I E S F O R A N E V O L V I N G V I R U S

    PA N E L I S T S

    M A R K B U R L E S O N , D V M W A Y N E F A R M S

    D A V I D F R E N C H , D V M S A N D E R S O N F A R M S

    M A R K J A C K W O O D , P h D U N I V E R S I T Y O F G E O R G I A

    M E A G A N S L A T E R , D V M M O U N T A I R E F A R M S

    K A L E N C O O K S O N , D V M Z O E T I S

  • M O D E R A T O R : J E A N S A N D E R , D V M Z O E T I S

    S A R A H T I L L E Y, D V M F I E L D A L E F A R M S

    G U I L L E R M O Z A V A L A , D V M , P h D A V I A N H E A L T H I N T E R N A T I O N A L

    B R I A N L A D M A N , P h D U N I V E R S I T Y O F D E L A W A R E

    H I G H L I G H T S O F A R O U N D T A B L E D I S C U S S I O N POULTRY H E A L T H T O D A Y ®

  • I N F E C T I O U S B R O N C H I T I S : E V O L V I N G S T R A T E G I E S F O R A N E V O L V I N G V I R U S

    S A N D E R What geographic regions do your operations cover, and do the IBV serotypes you see differ from one region to another? F R E N C H At Sanderson Farms, we see regional challenges that are a little different from one area to the next. We cover the Southeast from Texas all the way over to North Carolina. I would say in Texas, our biggest challenge has been Newcastle disease (ND). For IBV, our biggest challenge was with DMV/1639, which was primarily in south Georgia, although we found a little of it in Mississippi as well. In Mississippi, we mostly find GA08. So, there’s a bit of a different challenge in different regions. B U R L E S O N We cover a lot of the Southeast from Arkansas to North Carolina and all the states in between. It’s very geographical — there are different IBV serotypes in different places. For instance, we’ve isolated DMV/1639 isolates only in south Alabama and in Arkansas. S L A T E R Mountaire has isolated GA13 in North Carolina flocks. We’re going to try to do more surveillance and see what’s going on in that area. On the Delmarva shore, there’s been quite a bit of DMV/1639 as well as some GA08. It was the same in Pennsylvania when I was there.

    S A N D E R What I’m hearing is that the IBV serotypes seen vary regionally. But given that, are you seeing an overall increase in problems with bronchitis, or is it really more of a shifting landscape? T I L L E Y We routinely take serum from processed flocks. In summertime, IBV calms down a bit, whereas in winter titers will increase. But generally, I’d say our titers stay relatively stable. F R E N C H I’d say it’s a shifting landscape. A lot of our problems with bronchitis before this past year were self-induced with vaccine application. This past year, it’s been a little bit of a different scenario with DMV/1639 and IBV evolving and then spreading. It’s been a greater concern for us this year. Maybe a little bit more of a bronchitis challenge. I expect to see a new IBV variant emerge about every 5 years. B U R L E S O N I agree. There is a seasonal aspect to bronchitis. Generally based on my experience, summer is always better, and winter and spring tend to be the worst. However, if significant respiratory diseases pop up, it’s typically due to a new variant IBV. Problems can also arise if someone misapplies vaccine, or maybe you decide to go to a different vaccine manufacturer and the new vaccine just doesn’t play well with your current program. But I’d say primarily the ebb and flow of variant bronchitis viruses is what we struggle with from year to year.

    S A N D E R Would practitioners on the panel briefly give us an idea about the impact of infectious bronchitis in their respective operations? B U R L E S O N I’d say it’s our biggest respiratory issue. Bronchitis seems to be a year-long struggle — tracking variants as they arise and staying ahead of them. F R E N C H IBV Arkansas tends to be a nagging problem for us. This year, we thought we had everything under control, particularly with our vaccination program, but then we had our first experience with the IBV variant DMV/1639. It caught me completely by surprise. We didn’t even know we had a respiratory disease. We were trying to explain some lost feed conversion and stumbled upon DMV/1639. So, we have it in our operation, and it’s been a new challenge to figure out how to keep it under control. That’s been our biggest issue. S L A T E R Poultry