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    www.LTSGlobal.com

    1-888- 877-9531

    Elwood F. "Ed" Holton III, is CEO of Learning Transfer Solutions

    Global LLC and Jones S. Davis Distinguished Professor of Human

    Resource, Leadership and Organization Development at Louisiana

    State University, USA. Dr. Holton has led efforts to create theLearning Transfer System Inventory and the Training Transfer

    Solution system over the last 15 years. With over 200 articles and

    17 books, he is widely considered to be an international expert on

    human resource development and particularly learning transfer.

    Contact him [email protected]

    Dr. Ed Holton is one of the premier experts in learning transfer. Great to work with and extremely

    professional.November 29, 2010 Robin Kistler,

    Director, LSU Executive Education, LSU -Stephenson Entrepreneurship Institute

    Ed Holton is one of, if not the, foremost experts in the area of transfer of training and perhaps HRD ingeneral. He has rather ingeniously used the fruits of his career-long research and experience andshaped it into the tools that companies can and should benefit from. Having personally worked withEd on research projects in this area I can definitively say that his solutions are meticulouslydeveloped and designed and boast rigorous theoretical framework (not something you encounterfrequently in HRD consulting). At the same time Eds tools and methods are designed for the real -world, demonstrating his exceptional ability to connect research and practice. Last but not least, he isa pleasure to work with, approachable, and down-to-earth and I have always walked away from aconversation with him feeling like Ive learned something new.November 21, 2010

    Bogdan Yamkovenko, PhDOrganizational Development and Research

    Coordinator, The Shaw Group

    I regard Ed Holton as among the leading experts in the world on the subject of transfer of learning.Although he has written widely and is highly-regarded in the academic community, his unique gift isthe ability to convert ideas to practice and make a real difference in the effectiveness of learning

    initiatives in organizations.November 19, 2010Tim Baldwin,

    Eveleigh Professor of Business Leadership,Kelley School of Business

    mailto:[email protected]:[email protected]:[email protected]://www.linkedin.com/profile/view?id=17084513&authType=name&authToken=mjsm&goback=%2Enpv_34176097_*1_*1_*1_*1_*1_*1_*1_*1_*1_*1_*1_*1_*1_*1_*1_*1_*1_*1_*1_*1http://www.linkedin.com/profile/view?id=17084513&authType=name&authToken=mjsm&goback=%2Enpv_34176097_*1_*1_*1_*1_*1_*1_*1_*1_*1_*1_*1_*1_*1_*1_*1_*1_*1_*1_*1_*1http://www.linkedin.com/profile/view?id=31429448&authType=name&authToken=jiAx&goback=%2Enpv_34176097_*1_*1_*1_*1_*1_*1_*1_*1_*1_*1_*1_*1_*1_*1_*1_*1_*1_*1_*1_*1http://www.linkedin.com/profile/view?id=31429448&authType=name&authToken=jiAx&goback=%2Enpv_34176097_*1_*1_*1_*1_*1_*1_*1_*1_*1_*1_*1_*1_*1_*1_*1_*1_*1_*1_*1_*1http://www.linkedin.com/profile/view?id=4185832&authType=name&authToken=wKQ_&goback=%2Enpv_34176097_*1_*1_*1_*1_*1_*1_*1_*1_*1_*1_*1_*1_*1_*1_*1_*1_*1_*1_*1_*1http://www.linkedin.com/profile/view?id=4185832&authType=name&authToken=wKQ_&goback=%2Enpv_34176097_*1_*1_*1_*1_*1_*1_*1_*1_*1_*1_*1_*1_*1_*1_*1_*1_*1_*1_*1_*1http://www.linkedin.com/profile/view?id=4185832&authType=name&authToken=wKQ_&goback=%2Enpv_34176097_*1_*1_*1_*1_*1_*1_*1_*1_*1_*1_*1_*1_*1_*1_*1_*1_*1_*1_*1_*1http://www.linkedin.com/profile/view?id=31429448&authType=name&authToken=jiAx&goback=%2Enpv_34176097_*1_*1_*1_*1_*1_*1_*1_*1_*1_*1_*1_*1_*1_*1_*1_*1_*1_*1_*1_*1http://www.linkedin.com/profile/view?id=17084513&authType=name&authToken=mjsm&goback=%2Enpv_34176097_*1_*1_*1_*1_*1_*1_*1_*1_*1_*1_*1_*1_*1_*1_*1_*1_*1_*1_*1_*1mailto:[email protected]
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    The mistake we make is that we use

    these few people as justification for

    the worth of the entire

    training/learning effort. These

    anecdotal "success stories" becomethe metric for success. Instead of

    looking at the return on investment

    from the whole class, we often

    focus just on the few success

    stories and conclude the whole

    effort was successful.

    The Mirage Of The Innovators and Early Adopters

    In every training class there are at least a few people

    who just LOVE what we are teaching and jump to

    implement what they learn. And, oh how we love these

    people! These are the students trainers live for and

    keep us motivated from day to day. They are a joy and

    they make our training lives rewarding and satisfying.

    Unfortunately they are a bit of a mirage. The mistake we

    make is that we use these few people as justification for

    the worth of the entire training/learning effort. These

    anecdotal "success stories" become the metric for

    success. Instead of looking at the return on investment

    from the whole class, we often focus just on the few

    success stories and conclude the whole effort was

    successful.

    Let me explain why this is

    shortsighted. There is a rich

    body of research that explains

    why we are always likely to

    find these ambitious fewemployees who will transfer

    what they learn. It is called

    the diffusion of innovation

    research. It turns out that it

    doesn't matter whether we are

    teaching uneducated farmers

    to plow rows in their fields

    differently or college-educated

    professionals how to service

    their customers better the rate of adoption follows a

    remarkably similar pattern. Typically, 2.5% of the

    people, called innovators, will jump immediately to try

    something new just because they love new things.

    Another 13.5% of the people, called early adopters, can

    be persuaded to try new things with only reasonable

    effort such as we might do in a training class. The

    remainder of the people will be much slower to adop

    new things.

    Now if you do the math that means that we can fairly

    easily expect to convince 15% of our trainees to use the

    new methods we are teaching. Remember what our

    estimate is of typical rates of learning transfer--10-30%-

    Exactly in the range that is predicted by the diffusion

    research!! And 2.5% of the people will do anything new

    just because they like change!

    So you see it is a mirage for us to focus just on these

    innovators and early adopters. Fortunately the early

    adopters can be influential in getting other people to

    adopt the new learning but at the end of the day the

    "fallacy of the few" means we have to look beyond the

    15% who are likely to be success stories and find waysto reach the other 85% of trainees.

    The solution is transfe

    management. The first 15%

    of trainees are the "low-

    hanging fruit" of training. To

    get the rest we have to pu

    in place PROACTIVE

    strategies that will catalyze

    learning transfer.

    http://www.learningtransferguru.com/2010/09/fallacy-of-few.html
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    www.LTSGlobal.com

    1-888- 877-9531

    Suppose you could DOUBLE the

    performance improvement that

    results from your training

    programs. That's real money you

    can make (or save) for your

    organizations. Cutting costs by not

    working on improving learning

    transfer is NOT the right response.

    Increase Learning Transfer Improvement To Help Your

    Organization Through The Tough Times

    Everywhere I look I see people and organizations trying

    to do more with less in this weak economy. For

    example, I am continuing to drive my car with 90,000

    miles on it rather than buy a new one. We eat out at

    restaurants less than we used to and generally try to

    squeeze more out of our income each month. Every

    organization I talk to is trying to do the same thing. They

    are cutting budgets, reducing staff and generally trying to

    squeeze all they can out of every dollar. I suspect you

    are doing it too.

    Trainers and human resource developers, I have the

    perfect answer for you---improve your learning transfer!

    I know, the typical answer is to reduce costs. But,

    suppose you could DOUBLE the performance

    improvement that results from your training programs.

    That's real money you can make (or save) for your

    organizations. Cutting costs by not working on

    improving learning transfer is NOT the right response.

    Let me relate it to my personal car situation. I just spent

    some money on maintenance to extend the life of my car

    with 90,000 miles on it. If I hadn't spent the maintenance

    money, the car would have had major problems and I

    would have to buy a new car. By investing a modest

    amount now, I can get a much greater return out of the

    car. In this case, SPENDING money was my best way

    to SAVE money. Makes sense right?

    Well then spending some money to increase learning

    transfer also makes sense. Think about this--how much

    more money would your organization make--or save--i

    you doubled your learning transfer rate? And how much

    would it cost you to increase transfer that much? O

    course, with our TransferLogix system the answer is no

    very much.

    In the end, increasing transfer is your best investment

    right now. Don't let tight budgets cause you to overlook

    your best way to help

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