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expensive feedstock. Timing was critical and the simplicity of the system allowed for faster installation to meet Valero’s requirement. Original Source: Praxair Inc, 39 Old Ridgebury Road, Danbury, CT 06810, USA, tel: +1 716 879 4077, fax: +1 716 879 2040, website: http://www.praxair.com (17 Apr 2013) © Praxair Technology Inc 2013 SINOxR plate catalysts ensure safe NOx reduction in Denmark In order to significantly reduce the emission of NOx in its power stations, DONG Energy has cooperated with Johnson Matthey Catalysts (Germany) GmbH since 2009. The leading producer of technical ceramics with manufacturing in Redwitz, Germany, provides SINOxR plate catalyst for the Power Stations 3 and 4 of Studstrupvaerket, one of ten central power stations operated by the Danish energy provider. The catalyst reduces nitrogen oxides in the power station’s exhaust air. The power plants are fuelled 90% with coal and about 10% with biomass. Each unit generates up to 350 MW electricity and additionally provides heat to most of the citizens of the city of Aarhus and the surrounding region. The technical performance and the price/performance ratio of the JM product convinced the power plant operator to replace 380 m 3 of older catalysts with SINOxR catalyst. Since the replacement of the catalyst beds, the power station operates with good clean exhaust values and improved plant availability. Now, all required load ranges can be achieved in the power station without problems and DONG Energy has made good progress toward their objective of removing almost all nitrogen oxides from the exhaust air of its power stations by deciding for SINOxR catalysts. Nitrogen oxide reduction with SINOxR catalysts is based on the most effective principle available, the selective catalytic reduction process. In this process, the nitrogen oxides are mixed with a reduction medium and is then transformed into harmless nitrogen and water without any disadvantageous secondary reactions. However, at cooler operating temperature range between 270° and 380°, ammonium sulfate settles in the catalysts. Technical experts at JM documented, based on laboratory tests, the fact that high-grade SINOxR catalysts can be operated at these temperatures without fouling problems. Examples for fields of application are firing systems using hard coal, heavy fuel oil and residual oil from refineries as well as high-dust industrial processes and wood firing. Original Source: Johnson Matthey Power Plant Industries, website: http://www.powerplantcatalysts.com/en (18 Apr 2013) © Johnson Matthey Catalysts (Germany) Power Plants Industries 2013 JM introduces low-cost base-metal catalyst for PTA plants Johnson Matthey has developed a new low-cost, base-metal Halocat SC29 catalyst specifically designed to reduce up to 99% of VOC and toxic organic compounds from purified terephthalic acid (PTA) manufacturing plants. Available from JM’s Stationary Emissions Control (SEC) Group, the breakthrough catalyst has important advantages: significant lower cost of ownership with the same leading VOC reduction; smaller capital investment because the catalyst does not contain high cost platinum group metals; price protection against market fluctuations in precious metal; and high VOC reduction performance that is equivalent to more expensive precious metal catalysts. Original Source: Johnson Matthey Power Plant Industries, website: http://www.powerplantcatalysts.com/en (5 Apr 2013) © Johnson Matthey Catalysts (Germany) Power Plants Industries 2013 Rennovia’s bio-based adipic acid production method identified as most economical process Rennovia Inc, has been identified in an IHS report as prospect for cost- advantaged bio-based adipic acid production as against conventional petroleum-based processes based on oxidation of cyclohexane, and more recently described processes employing fermentation. While noting that both the Rennovia and fermentation processes have yet to be scaled to commercial plants, which introduces some inherent uncertainties in the technical and economic analyses, the IHS Chemical Process Economics Program (PEP) Report #284 Bio-Based Adipic Acid concluded that Rennovia’s process offers lower projected cash and full production costs than the current, dominant petroleum-based process, and potential fermentation processes proposed to be under development. Original Source: Rennovia, 2013. Found on SpecialChem Adhesives and Sealants Formulation, 26 Apr 2013, (Website: http://www.specialchem4adhesives.com) PATENTS Dual zeolite catalyst for making ethyl benzene This is a process for making ethyl benzene from ethanol and benzene. Two process are involved. One converts the ethanol to ethane and then ethylene; the other is essentially a Fischer-Tropsch reaction which combines the ethylene with the benzene. A variety of catalysts, mostly of MFI topology can be used for the first step. The second step is catalysed by NES zeotypes, mostly SAPO types. The two zeolites are bound with alumina and calcined together. US 8,435,909, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dharan, Saudi Arabia, 7 May 2013 Catalysts using organic-inorganic supports The complex catalysts are intended for a variety of hydrorefining and hydroconversion reaction reactions in petrochemistry. They are made by grafting a metallo-organic compound, such as a metal alkoxide, on to a sulphur-containing inorganic support also containing a catalytic metal. US 8,435,912, IFP Energies Nouvelles, Rueill Malmaison, France, 7 May 2013 Ethanol from methanol from biomass The ethanol is carbonylated with carbon monoxide over a rhodium- containing catalyst; the resulting methyl acetate is hydrogenated to methanol. All the ingredients can be obtained from biomass. US 8,436,215, Anerkem Inc, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, 7 May 2013 Ethanol from methanol from acetic acid This process uses two streams obtained by carbonylation of methanol using a rhodium-containing catalyst under aqueous conditions. One stream is substantially acetaldehyde, the other JUNE 2013 7 FOCUS ON CATALYSTS

Ethanol from methanol from biomass

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expensive feedstock. Timing wascritical and the simplicity of thesystem allowed for faster installationto meet Valero’s requirement.

Original Source: Praxair Inc, 39 Old Ridgebury Road,Danbury, CT 06810, USA, tel: +1 716 879 4077, fax:+1 716 879 2040, website: http://www.praxair.com(17 Apr 2013) © Praxair Technology Inc 2013

SINOxR plate catalysts ensure safeNOx reduction in Denmark

In order to significantly reduce theemission of NOx in its power stations,DONG Energy has cooperated withJohnson Matthey Catalysts (Germany)GmbH since 2009. The leadingproducer of technical ceramics withmanufacturing in Redwitz, Germany,provides SINOxR plate catalyst for thePower Stations 3 and 4 ofStudstrupvaerket, one of ten centralpower stations operated by the Danishenergy provider. The catalyst reducesnitrogen oxides in the power station’sexhaust air. The power plants arefuelled 90% with coal and about 10%with biomass. Each unit generates upto 350 MW electricity and additionallyprovides heat to most of the citizens ofthe city of Aarhus and the surroundingregion. The technical performance andthe price/performance ratio of the JMproduct convinced the power plantoperator to replace 380 m3 of oldercatalysts with SINOxR catalyst. Sincethe replacement of the catalyst beds,the power station operates with goodclean exhaust values and improvedplant availability. Now, all required loadranges can be achieved in the powerstation without problems and DONGEnergy has made good progresstoward their objective of removingalmost all nitrogen oxides from theexhaust air of its power stations bydeciding for SINOxR catalysts. Nitrogenoxide reduction with SINOxR catalystsis based on the most effective principleavailable, the selective catalyticreduction process. In this process, thenitrogen oxides are mixed with areduction medium and is thentransformed into harmless nitrogen andwater without any disadvantageoussecondary reactions. However, atcooler operating temperature rangebetween 270° and 380°, ammoniumsulfate settles in the catalysts. Technicalexperts at JM documented, based onlaboratory tests, the fact that high-gradeSINOxR catalysts can be operated atthese temperatures without fouling

problems. Examples for fields ofapplication are firing systems usinghard coal, heavy fuel oil and residual oilfrom refineries as well as high-dustindustrial processes and wood firing.

Original Source: Johnson Matthey Power PlantIndustries, website:http://www.powerplantcatalysts.com/en (18 Apr 2013)© Johnson Matthey Catalysts (Germany) PowerPlants Industries 2013

JM introduces low-cost base-metalcatalyst for PTA plants

Johnson Matthey has developed anew low-cost, base-metal HalocatSC29 catalyst specifically designed toreduce up to 99% of VOC and toxicorganic compounds from purifiedterephthalic acid (PTA) manufacturingplants. Available from JM’s StationaryEmissions Control (SEC) Group, thebreakthrough catalyst has importantadvantages: significant lower cost ofownership with the same leading VOCreduction; smaller capital investmentbecause the catalyst does not containhigh cost platinum group metals; priceprotection against market fluctuationsin precious metal; and high VOCreduction performance that isequivalent to more expensiveprecious metal catalysts.

Original Source: Johnson Matthey Power PlantIndustries, website:http://www.powerplantcatalysts.com/en (5 Apr 2013)© Johnson Matthey Catalysts (Germany) PowerPlants Industries 2013

Rennovia’s bio-based adipic acidproduction method identified as mosteconomical process

Rennovia Inc, has been identified inan IHS report as prospect for cost-advantaged bio-based adipic acidproduction as against conventionalpetroleum-based processes based onoxidation of cyclohexane, and morerecently described processesemploying fermentation. While notingthat both the Rennovia andfermentation processes have yet to bescaled to commercial plants, whichintroduces some inherent uncertaintiesin the technical and economicanalyses, the IHS Chemical ProcessEconomics Program (PEP) Report#284 Bio-Based Adipic Acid concludedthat Rennovia’s process offers lowerprojected cash and full productioncosts than the current, dominantpetroleum-based process, and

potential fermentation processesproposed to be under development.

Original Source: Rennovia, 2013. Found onSpecialChem Adhesives and Sealants Formulation, 26 Apr 2013, (Website:http://www.specialchem4adhesives.com)

PATENTSDual zeolite catalyst for making ethylbenzene

This is a process for making ethylbenzene from ethanol and benzene.Two process are involved. Oneconverts the ethanol to ethane andthen ethylene; the other is essentially aFischer-Tropsch reaction whichcombines the ethylene with thebenzene. A variety of catalysts, mostlyof MFI topology can be used for the firststep. The second step is catalysed byNES zeotypes, mostly SAPO types.The two zeolites are bound withalumina and calcined together.

US 8,435,909, King Fahd University of Petroleum andMinerals, Dharan, Saudi Arabia, 7 May 2013

Catalysts using organic-inorganicsupports

The complex catalysts are intendedfor a variety of hydrorefining andhydroconversion reaction reactions inpetrochemistry. They are made bygrafting a metallo-organic compound,such as a metal alkoxide, on to asulphur-containing inorganic supportalso containing a catalytic metal.

US 8,435,912, IFP Energies Nouvelles, RueillMalmaison, France, 7 May 2013

Ethanol from methanol from biomass

The ethanol is carbonylated withcarbon monoxide over a rhodium-containing catalyst; the resultingmethyl acetate is hydrogenated tomethanol. All the ingredients can beobtained from biomass.

US 8,436,215, Anerkem Inc, Montreal, Quebec,Canada, 7 May 2013

Ethanol from methanol from aceticacid

This process uses two streamsobtained by carbonylation of methanolusing a rhodium-containing catalystunder aqueous conditions. One streamis substantially acetaldehyde, the other

JUNE 2013 7

F O C U S O N C A T A LY S T S