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FSI: Genetics is specifically devoted to Forensic Genetics. This branch of Forensic Science can be defined as the application of Genetics (in the sense of a science with the purpose of studying inherited characteristics for the analysis of inter- and intraspecific variations in populations) for the resolution of legal conflicts. This includes paternity testing, criminal casework, and identification of human remains. Although protein and enzyme polymorphisms were firstly used to fullfil the aims of the field they have been substituted nowadays by DNA polymorphisms analyzed by a variety of molecular biological typing technologies. The amount of work in this field has increased enormously with no signs of slowing down with many new applications such as the application to non-human DNA material (crime scene, illegal trade in endangered species evidences, and bioterrorism) and the building and appropriate management of DNA databases. The scope of the journal includes: Forensic applications of human polymorphism: testing of paternity and other family relationships, imigration cases, typing of biological stains and tissues from criminal casework, identification of human remains by DNA testing methodologies. Description of human polymorphisms of forensic interest, with special interest in DNA polymorphisms. This includes autosomal DNA polymorphisms, mini- and microsatellites (or short tandem repeats, STRs), single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), X and Y chromosome polymorphisms, mtDNA polymorphisms, and any other type of DNA variation with potential forensic applications. DNA typing methodologies and strategies. Population genetics of human polymorphisms of forensic interest. Population data, specially from DNA polymorphisms of interest for the solution of forensic problems. Biostatistical methods in forensic genetics: Including the evaluation of DNA evidence in forensic problems (such as paternity or immigration cases, criminal casework, identification), classical and new statistical approaches. Standards in Forensic Genetics. Recommendations of regulatory bodies concerning methods, markers, interpretation or strategies or proposals for procedural or technical standards. Quality control: Quality control and quality assurance strategies, proficiency testing for DNA typing methodologies. Non-human DNA polymorphisms for crime scene investigation. Criminal DNA databases: technical, legal and statistical issues General ethical and legal issues related to forensic genetics EDITOR-IN-CHIEF A. Carracedo Instituto de Medicina Legal, Facultad de Medicina, 15705 Santiago de Compostela, Galicia, Spain Peter Schneider Inst. für Rechtsmedizin Klinikum der Universität zu Köln Melatengürtel 60-62 50823 Cologne Germany John Butler National Institute of Standards and Technology, 100 Bureau Drive, Mail Stop 8311, Gaithersburg, MD 20899-8311, USA Adrian Linacre South Australian Justice Chair in Forensic Science, School of Biological Sciences, GPO Box 21000, Adelaide SA 5001, Australia Leonor Gusmão IPATIMUP Rua Dr. Roberto Frias, s/n 4200-465 Porto Portugal Charles Brenner, USA John Buckleton, New Zealand Bruce Budowle, USA James Chun-I Lee, Taiwan Thore Egeland, Norway Peter Gill, UK Bertrand Ludes, France Wolfgang Mayr, Austria Niels Morling, Denmark Walther Parson, Austria Lutz Roewer, Germany Tom Parsons, USA Vincenzo Pascali, Italy Mecki Prinz, USA Antonio Salas, Spain Antti Sajantila, Finland Keiji Tamaki, Japan ASSOCIATE EDITORS EDITORIAL BOARD

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FSI: Genetics is specifi cally devoted to Forensic Genetics. This branch of Forensic Science can be defi ned as the application of Genetics (in the sense of a science with the purpose of studying inherited characteristics for the analysis of inter- and intraspecifi c variations in populations) for the resolution of legal confl icts. This includes paternity testing, criminal casework, and identifi cation of human remains. Although protein and enzyme polymorphisms were fi rstly used to fullfi l the aims of the fi eld they have been substituted nowadays by DNA polymorphisms analyzed by a variety of molecular biological typing technologies. The amount of work in this fi eld has increased enormously with no signs of slowing down with many new applications such as the application to non-human DNA material (crime scene, illegal trade in endangered species evidences, and bioterrorism) and the building and appropriate management of DNA databases.

The scope of the journal includes:

• Forensic applications of human polymorphism: testing of paternity and other family relationships, imigration cases, typing of biological stains and tissues from criminal casework, identifi cation of human remains by DNA testing methodologies.

• Description of human polymorphisms of forensic interest, with special interest in DNA polymorphisms. This includes autosomal DNA polymorphisms, mini- and microsatellites (or short tandem repeats, STRs), single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), X and Y chromosome polymorphisms, mtDNA polymorphisms, and any other type of DNA variation with potential forensic applications.

• DNA typing methodologies and strategies. • Population genetics of human polymorphisms of forensic interest. Population data, specially from DNA polymorphisms of interest for the

solution of forensic problems. • Biostatistical methods in forensic genetics: Including the evaluation of DNA evidence in forensic problems (such as paternity or immigration

cases, criminal casework, identifi cation), classical and new statistical approaches. • Standards in Forensic Genetics. Recommendations of regulatory bodies concerning methods, markers, interpretation or strategies or proposals

for procedural or technical standards. • Quality control: Quality control and quality assurance strategies, profi ciency testing for DNA typing methodologies. • Non-human DNA polymorphisms for crime scene investigation. • Criminal DNA databases: technical, legal and statistical issues • General ethical and legal issues related to forensic genetics

EDITOR-IN-CHIEFA. Carracedo Instituto de Medicina Legal,Facultad de Medicina,15705 Santiago de Compostela, Galicia, Spain

Peter SchneiderInst. für RechtsmedizinKlinikum der Universität zu KölnMelatengürtel 60-6250823 CologneGermany

John ButlerNational Institute of Standards and Technology,100 Bureau Drive, Mail Stop 8311,Gaithersburg, MD 20899-8311,USA

Adrian LinacreSouth Australian Justice Chair in ForensicScience, School of Biological Sciences,GPO Box 21000, Adelaide SA 5001,Australia

Leonor GusmãoIPATIMUPRua Dr. Roberto Frias, s/n4200-465 PortoPortugal

Charles Brenner, USAJohn Buckleton, New ZealandBruce Budowle, USAJames Chun-I Lee, TaiwanThore Egeland, NorwayPeter Gill, UK

Bertrand Ludes, FranceWolfgang Mayr, AustriaNiels Morling, DenmarkWalther Parson, AustriaLutz Roewer, GermanyTom Parsons, USA

Vincenzo Pascali, ItalyMecki Prinz, USAAntonio Salas, SpainAntti Sajantila, FinlandKeiji Tamaki, Japan

ASSOCIATE EDITORS

EDITORIAL BOARD

Forensic Science International:Genetics An International journal dedicated to the applications of genetics in the administration of justice

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