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e s , t h e y w e r e t h e f o o t p r i n t s o f a g i g a n t i c h o u n d ! Edexcel GCSE (9-1) English Language Resources Guide New for 2015

Edexcel GCSE (9-1) English Language - Pearson Education · English Language Text Anthology Emma Curran and Helen Lines Series consultant: Debra Myhill ALWAYS LEARNING REVISE EDEXCEL

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  • mes, they were the footp

    rints of a gigantic h

    ound!

    Edexcel GCSE (9-1)

    English LanguageResources Guide

    New for 2015

  • mes, t

    hey were the footprints of a gigantic hound!

    32

    Hello and welcome Why choose our Edexcel GCSE (91) English Language teaching and learning service?

    GCSE English is changing for first teaching from September 2015 and were here to support you as you start to think about how best to tackle those changes. Were launching a brand new teaching and learning service designed specifically for the Edexcel GCSE (91) English Language specification. Our resources will help you:

    teach the new Edexcel GCSE (91) English Language specification* with confidence

    prepare students for the new style of assessments

    support and monitor your students progress, so you can make sure they are on track to achieve their full potential

    improve your students writing skills so that they can write in a sustained, technically accurate and effective way

    develop student confidence and resilience when responding to challenging unseen texts

    deepen your own understanding of the Grammar for Writing and Lets Think in English pedagogies.

    ContentsGrammar for Writing pedagogy ................................................. 4

    Lets Think in English pedagogy .................................................. 5

    Text Anthology ............................................................................67

    ActiveLearn Digital Service .................................................. 816

    Revision .......................................................................................... 17

    Professional Development ......................................................... 17

    Summary grid matching resource features to the new GCSE ..................................................1819

    Next steps ...................................................................................... 20

    * Our resources are going through the review process to get Edexcel endorsement. To find out more about the new Edexcel GCSE (91) English Language specification, visit www.edexcel.com/englishfor2015

    Our new resources have been developed in exclusive partnership with experts from the University of Exeter and Kings College London. The course components incorporate both the Grammar for Writing and the Lets Think in English pedagogies specifically designed to help with improving writing, and building confidence with unseen texts.

    Improving writing through Grammar for WritingDebra Myhills Grammar for Writing pedagogy has been trialled and shown to significantly increase the rate of progress in reading and writing. Students explore and analyse the choices writers make and then experiment with those choices in their own writing. See page 4.

    Building confidence with unseen texts through Lets Think in EnglishThe Lets Think in English pedagogy is underpinned by research and focuses on developing inference, deduction and analysis skills to build students confidence when tackling unseen texts in exam conditions. See page 5.

    Supporting differentiation and progression for all your studentsOur resources are organised into six differentiated tiers helping you to consider your teaching to suit the ability profile of your classes. The structure also supports a cumulative approach to developing reading and writing, where students can revisit and extend skills as they progress from one tier to the next. Assessment materials are provided to help you monitor that progress. See page 8.

    Text AnthologyOne student book with 100 fiction and non-fiction extracts carefully chosen to engage students and help provide a context for building the skills they will need. See pages 67.

    Revision Guide and WorkbookBrand new Revision Guide and Workbook, written specifically to support your students with their GCSE mocks and final exam preparation. See page 17.

    Professional Development Pedagogy TrainingGain a deeper understanding of the Grammar for Writing and the Lets Think in English pedagogies and how best to embed them into your teaching. See page 17.

    ActiveLearn Digital ServiceOne annual subscription gives you full access to our interactive front-of-class teaching, planning and assessment service: a wealth of resources to support every extract in the Anthology. See pages 816.

    But as I listened, I heard as if from

    down below in the valley

    the howling of many wolves

    . Th

    e Count's ey

    es, and

    We were both silent for a while, and as I looked towards

    Hitherto I had noticed the backs of his h

    ands as the

    y lay on his kn

    ees in the fire

    light, and they had seemed rather

    white and

    mes, they were the footp

    rints of a gigantic h

    ound!

    Edexcel GCSE (9-1)

    English LanguageText Anthology Emma Curran and Helen LinesSeries consultant: Debra Myhill

    A LWAY S L E A R N I NG

    REVISE EDEXCEL GCSE (9-1)

    English Language

    REVISION GUIDE

    A LWAY S L E A R N I NG

    Shares the same Grammar for Writing methodology used in our KS3 Skills for Writing course.

    Course components

    www.edexcel.com/englishfor2015

  • mes, t

    hey were the footprints of a gigantic hound!

    54

    Pearson Education Ltd 2015. Copying pe

    rmitted for purchasing institution only. This m

    aterial is not copyright free. 1

    The Witch I have walked a great

    while over the snow,

    And I am not tall nor strong.

    My clothes are wet, and my teeth are set,

    And the way was hard and long.

    I have wandered over the fruitful earth,

    But I never came here before.

    Oh, lift me over the threshold, and let me in

    at the door!

    The cutting wind is a c

    ruel foe.

    I dare not stand in the blast.

    My hands are stone, and my voice a groan,

    And the worst of death is past.

    I am but a little maiden still,

    My little white feet are sore.

    Oh, lift me over the threshold, and let me in

    at the door!

    Improving writing through Grammar for Writing

    Building confidence with unseen texts: Lets Think in English

    Research strongly suggests that poor writing skills are one of the fundamental reasons why more learners do not go on to realise their potential.

    Lets Think in English is a teaching programme created by Laurie Smith and Michael Walsh for Kings College London to help students develop the response and analysis skills necessary for success in English. The programme has been trialled by 100+ schools over five years and proven to work with students of all abilities.

    Lets Think in English (LTE) consists of lessons designed to be used fortnightly, all using high-interest texts. The lessons are largely oral, based on reading, open-ended questioning and structured group discussion. They systematically develop students skills of inference, deduction and analysis, increasing their confidence, understanding and ability to express their ideas. This can lead to higher results in written examinations as well as in speaking and listening. Read more in the separate leaflet The Lets Think in English Pedagogy.

    Our new teaching and learning service for Edexcel GCSE (91) English Language includes six exclusive LTE lessons, with the planning, guidance and resources you need to teach them.

    In 2012, Professor Myhill and her team at the University of Exeter published the findings of a three-year study into the impact of contextualised grammar teaching a pedagogy developed at the University of Exeter and now called Grammar for Writing. In the study, KS3 students exposed to this pedagogy made almost double the rate of progress in writing.

    Grammar for Writing at KS4GCSE change for 2015 brings about a new set of expectations and challenges for students, most notably with the emphasis on 100% examination, literary heritage texts, writing skills and technical accuracy.

    A positive impact on reading and writingMore recently, Professor Myhill and her team carried out a new study at KS4 to see if it had the same significant effect. Again, the intervention had a statistically significant positive impact on students reading as well as writing, specifically with language analysis, sentence structure, punctuation and spelling. Read more in the separate leaflet The Grammar for Writing Pedagogy at KS4.

    The seven Grammar for Writing pedagogical principles1. Make a link between the grammar being introduced and how it works in the writing

    being taught.

    2. Explain the grammar through examples, not lengthy explanations.

    3. Build in high-quality discussion about grammar and its effects.

    4. Use creative imitation to offer model patterns for students to play with and then use in their own writing.

    5. Use authentic examples from authentic texts to link writers to the broader community of writers.

    6. Select activities which support students in making choices and being designers of writing.

    7. Include language play, experimentation, risk-taking and games.

    We strongly believe the Grammar for Writing pedagogy provides an exciting, evidence-based approach to improving writing and reading progress at KS3 and KS4 through contextualised grammar teaching thats why it underpins our brand-new teaching and learning service to help you tackle this critical need.

    These resources draw on research conducted in the Centre for Research in Writing at the University of Exeter over many years and set out to de-mystify the writing process through being explicit about how writing is shaped and crafted. Professor Debra Myhill, Exeter University

    Texts studied are in the Text Anthology and supported by LTE worksheets, and powerpoints on our ActiveLearn Digital Service. These guide you through the structure of the LTE lessons.

  • mes, t

    hey were the footprints of a gigantic hound!

    6 7

    Animal welfare

    2 3

    Perhaps the most exciting discovery I made in this multicoloured Lilliput* to which I had access was an earwigs nest. I had long wanted to find one and had searched everywhere without success, so the joy of stumbling upon one unexpectedly was overwhelming, like suddenly being given a wonderful present. I moved a piece of bark and there beneath it was the nursery, a small hollow in the earth that the insect must have burrowed out for herself. She squatted in the middle of it, shielding underneath her a few white eggs. She crouched over them like a hen, and did not move when the flood of sunlight struck her as I lifted the bark. I could not count the eggs, but there did not seem to be many, so I presumed that she had not yet laid her full complement. Tenderly I replaced her lid of bark.

    From that moment I guarded the nest jealously.I erected a protecting wall of rocks round it, and

    as an additional precaution I wrote out a notice in red ink and stuck it on a pole nearby as a warning to the family. The notice read: BEWAR EARWIG NEST QUIAT PLESE. It was only remarkable in that the two correctly spelt words were biological

    If you saw your neighbour whipping a dog, youd be on the phone to the police immediately, right? Of course, anyone with a shred of decency condemns hurting animals. Yet, inexplicably, some still turn a blind eye to the cruelty to horses during the Grand National, in which riders are required to carry a whip. Nearly every year, racehorses sustain injuries. Many have paid with their lives.

    When 40 skittish horses are jammed onto a treacherous obstacle course, viciously whipped, and forced into jumping, breakdowns are inevitable. Last year, only 17 fewer than half finished the Grand National, and while the race organisers were quick to highlight an absence of fatalities after last years main event, they conveniently failed to mention that two horses died at the same course earlier in the week. According to research by Animal Aid in 2012, Aintree was the most lethal of all of Britains racecourses, claiming the lives of six horses in just eight days of racing.

    Treated like wind-up toys their fragile limbs pushed to and sometimes beyond breaking point many horses sustain fractured legs or necks or severed tendons, while others have heart attacks. Every year, hundreds of horses die on British race tracks. More are turned into dog food when they stop winning.

    The mindset that horses are little more than tools to be used, abused and discarded is entrenched* in the racing industry. Ruby Walshs comment that horses are replaceable is deeply offensive. Horses are not unfeeling they experience joy, anxiety, fear and affection. They are also clever and perceptive, as anyone who has seen a horse figure out how to open stable-door latches will tell you. However, Walshs comments were prophetic*: the very next day, two more horses died on the Cheltenham track.

    Horses are sometimes drugged to mask pain and keep them running when they should be resting or receiving treatment. Raced too young and too hard, when their bones are not up to the pounding and stress, horses used in racing endure injuries, lameness and exhaustion. Last year, Godolphin trainer Mahmood al -Zarooni was banned from racing for eight years after being found guilty of doping offences.

    People who care about horses should turn their backs on the Grand National and every other race in which horses are being run to death. This cruelty will end only when the public realises that there is no such thing as a harmless flutter when it comes to funding the cruel and exploitative horse-racing industry.

    2.1 Animal welfare

    My Family and Other AnimalsThis extract is taken from Gerald Durrells autobiographical account of the five years he spent living on the Greek island of Corfu, aged 10 to 15.

    Care about horses? Then you should boycott the Grand NationalThe article below was published in The Guardian newspaper the day before the 2014 Grand National horse race.

    ones. Every hour or so I would subject the mother earwig to ten minutes close scrutiny. I did not dare examine her more often for fear she might desert her nest. Eventually the pile of eggs beneath her grew, and she seemed to have become accustomed to my lifting off her bark roof. I even decided that she had begun to recognise me, from the friendly way she waggled her antennae.

    To my acute disappointment, after all my efforts and constant sentry duty, the babies hatched out during the night. I felt that, after all I had done, the female might have held up the hatching until I was there to witness it. However, there they were, a fine brood of young earwigs, minute, frail, looking as though they had been carved out of ivory. They moved gently under their mothers body, walking between her legs, the more venturesome even climbing on to her pincers. It was a heart-warming sight. The next day the nursery was empty: my wonderful family had scattered over the garden.

    I saw one of the babies some time later: he was bigger, of course, browner and stronger, but I recognized him immediately. He was curled up in a maze of rose-petals, having a sleep, and when I disturbed him he merely raised his pincers irritably over his back. I would have liked to think that it was a salute, a cheerful greeting, but honesty compelled me to admit that it was nothing more than an earwigs warning to a potential enemy. Still, I excused him. After all, he had been very young when I last saw him.

    Glossaryentrenched: long-lasting and difficult to change

    prophetic: an accurate prediction

    GlossaryLilliput: A reference to the fictional island from the novel Gullivers Travels, which is inhabited by tiny people.

    The Text Anthology also includes Assessment pages to give students experience of exam-style questions.

    (More assessment resources are provided on our ActiveLearn Digital Service.) Extracts for the Lets Think in English lessons (provided on our ActiveLearn Digital Service)

    to build the confidence and resilience of students when responding to unseen texts.

    Contextual information is provided to help students access each extract.

    Challenging words are supported by definitions in the glossary box.

    Text Anthology

    A fantastic bank of engaging fiction and non-fiction extracts.

    Extracts are usually from texts typical of those that students will encounter in their GCSE English Language exams.

    This course is organised into six differentiated tiers to support different ability profiles. Each tier consists of seven topics. Each topic offers three lessons based on a pair of extracts in the Text Anthology, centring around a particular theme e.g. Animal Welfare in topic 2.1.

    Sample pages from the Text Anthology

  • mes, t

    hey were the footprints of a gigantic hound!

    8 9

    Course structureWe know how important it is for you to understand the progress your students are making in the lead up to their GCSE, thats why this course is organised into six differentiated tiers.

    Each tier supports a particular ability profile so you can target the needs of your individual students and track their progress as they move to the next tier. Each differentiated tier offers seven topics (so 42 topics in the whole course) and each topic consists of three lessons (so 21 lessons in total per tier).

    Each topic is based on a pair of extracts from the Text Anthology and uses them as a context to build reading and writing skills. You can work through all the topics provided for a tier or dip in and use only particular topics from across the tiers.

    Tier of resources

    Suitable for students working at old NC Levels

    Tier 1 56

    Tier 2 67

    Tier 3 68

    Tier 4 78

    Tier 5 8+

    Tier 6 8+

    Introducing our ActiveLearn Digital Service powered by ActiveTeach

    Our ActiveLearn Digital Service is structured to support different abilities and to help you track progress.

    One annual subscription gives you full access to a wealth of resources to support every extract in the Text Anthology.

    Animal welfare

    2 3

    Perhaps the most exciting discovery I made in this multicoloured Lilliput* to which I had access was an earwigs nest. I had long wanted to find one and had searched everywhere without success, so the joy of stumbling upon one unexpectedly was overwhelming, like suddenly being given a wonderful present. I moved a piece of bark and there beneath it was the nursery, a small hollow in the earth that the insect must have burrowed out for herself. She squatted in the middle of it, shielding underneath her a few white eggs. She crouched over them like a hen, and did not move when the flood of sunlight struck her as I lifted the bark. I could not count the eggs, but there did not seem to be many, so I presumed that she had not yet laid her full complement. Tenderly I replaced her lid of bark.

    From that moment I guarded the nest jealously.I erected a protecting wall of rocks round it, and

    as an additional precaution I wrote out a notice in red ink and stuck it on a pole nearby as a warning to the family. The notice read: BEWAR EARWIG NEST QUIAT PLESE. It was only remarkable in that the two correctly spelt words were biological

    If you saw your neighbour whipping a dog, youd be on the phone to the police immediately, right? Of course, anyone with a shred of decency condemns hurting animals. Yet, inexplicably, some still turn a blind eye to the cruelty to horses during the Grand National, in which riders are required to carry a whip. Nearly every year, racehorses sustain injuries. Many have paid with their lives.

    When 40 skittish horses are jammed onto a treacherous obstacle course, viciously whipped, and forced into jumping, breakdowns are inevitable. Last year, only 17 fewer than half finished the Grand National, and while the race organisers were quick to highlight an absence of fatalities after last years main event, they conveniently failed to mention that two horses died at the same course earlier in the week. According to research by Animal Aid in 2012, Aintree was the most lethal of all of Britains racecourses, claiming the lives of six horses in just eight days of racing.

    Treated like wind-up toys their fragile limbs pushed to and sometimes beyond breaking point many horses sustain fractured legs or necks or severed tendons, while others have heart attacks. Every year, hundreds of horses die on British race tracks. More are turned into dog food when they stop winning.

    The mindset that horses are little more than tools to be used, abused and discarded is entrenched* in the racing industry. Ruby Walshs comment that horses are replaceable is deeply offensive. Horses are not unfeeling they experience joy, anxiety, fear and affection. They are also clever and perceptive, as anyone who has seen a horse figure out how to open stable-door latches will tell you. However, Walshs comments were prophetic*: the very next day, two more horses died on the Cheltenham track.

    Horses are sometimes drugged to mask pain and keep them running when they should be resting or receiving treatment. Raced too young and too hard, when their bones are not up to the pounding and stress, horses used in racing endure injuries, lameness and exhaustion. Last year, Godolphin trainer Mahmood al -Zarooni was banned from racing for eight years after being found guilty of doping offences.

    People who care about horses should turn their backs on the Grand National and every other race in which horses are being run to death. This cruelty will end only when the public realises that there is no such thing as a harmless flutter when it comes to funding the cruel and exploitative horse-racing industry.

    2.1 Animal welfare

    My Family and Other AnimalsThis extract is taken from Gerald Durrells autobiographical account of the five years he spent living on the Greek island of Corfu, aged 10 to 15.

    Care about horses? Then you should boycott the Grand NationalThe article below was published in The Guardian newspaper the day before the 2014 Grand National horse race.

    ones. Every hour or so I would subject the mother earwig to ten minutes close scrutiny. I did not dare examine her more often for fear she might desert her nest. Eventually the pile of eggs beneath her grew, and she seemed to have become accustomed to my lifting off her bark roof. I even decided that she had begun to recognise me, from the friendly way she waggled her antennae.

    To my acute disappointment, after all my efforts and constant sentry duty, the babies hatched out during the night. I felt that, after all I had done, the female might have held up the hatching until I was there to witness it. However, there they were, a fine brood of young earwigs, minute, frail, looking as though they had been carved out of ivory. They moved gently under their mothers body, walking between her legs, the more venturesome even climbing on to her pincers. It was a heart-warming sight. The next day the nursery was empty: my wonderful family had scattered over the garden.

    I saw one of the babies some time later: he was bigger, of course, browner and stronger, but I recognized him immediately. He was curled up in a maze of rose-petals, having a sleep, and when I disturbed him he merely raised his pincers irritably over his back. I would have liked to think that it was a salute, a cheerful greeting, but honesty compelled me to admit that it was nothing more than an earwigs warning to a potential enemy. Still, I excused him. After all, he had been very young when I last saw him.

    Glossaryentrenched: long-lasting and difficult to change

    prophetic: an accurate prediction

    GlossaryLilliput: A reference to the fictional island from the novel Gullivers Travels, which is inhabited by tiny people.

    See pages 10-16 for sample material from Topic 2.1 Animal Welfare on our ActiveLearn Digital Service

    Start with whichever tier you think is most appropriate for your students. Subsequent tiers will revisit many of the skills but in a more sophisticated manner providing consolidation and extension. The structure supports a cumulative approach to learning.

    Whats included in our ActiveLearn Digital Service? The Text Anthology on screen for front of class use, with annotation tools to support discussion

    about each extract.

    The Teacher Guide to explain the resources provided for each topic and to help you plan and deliver engaging lessons.

    Twelve assessment papers in the style of the new exams, and accompanying mark schemes to help you to monitor the progress your students are making.

    Six exclusive Lets Think in English lessons that will help you build the confidence and resilience of students when responding to unseen texts.

    Differentiated resources for each of the 42 topics, to support students across the ability spectrum and to consolidate skills as they move to the next tier. Includes workshops, presentations, worksheets, interactive activities and more

    Sample from the ActiveLearn Digital Service showing the Text Anthology on screen

    Teacher Guide Reading for Meaning

    worksheets

    Progress Checks

    Assessment papers and mark schemes

    Writing tasks

    Grammar for Writing workshops

    and worksheets

    Critical writing Hooks

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    hey were the footprints of a gigantic hound!

    10 11

    Reading for meaning worksheets deepen understanding of each text and rehearse a range of reading strategies students will need for their assessments.

    Hooks

    ActiveLearn Digital Service sample material from Topic 2.1 Animal Welfare

    Teacher Guide

    Snappy Hook presentations at the start of each new topic help you to engage students with the topic theme.

    Reading for meaning

    2.1 Topic overview sheet: Animal Welfare

    The texts

    Text 120th CenturyNon-fiction

    Autobiography writing to describe My Family and Other Animals Written by Gerald Durrell An extract from Durrells autobiographical account of his familys life on the Greek

    island of Corfu from 19351939, written in 1956.

    Text 221st CenturyNon-fiction

    Newspaper article writing to argue Care about horses? Then you should boycott the Grand National Written by Mimi Bekhechi An article appearing in The Guardian, 4th April 2014, the day before the Grand

    National was run, encouraging readers to consider the treatment of race horses.

    Summary of lessons and coverage see full plans for detailsLesson Learning objectives Summary

    1 Be able to identify key ideas and events in an autobiography extract and how they support the writers intentionUnderstand how the selection of key ideas and events supports the writers intention

    Use Hook presentation to introduce the topic. Students read Text 1 (from My Family and Other Animals) in

    the Anthology or 2.1 Text 1. Complete reading for meaning activities on Reading for

    meaning worksheet 1. A Reading for meaning 1interactive provides extra optional support if time allows.

    Work through Writers Workshop 1 presentation to explorehow the writer has selected ideas and events to support his intention. This is also supported by an optional Writers workshop 1 progress check presentation and Short writing task worksheet if time allows.

    2 Be able to identify key arguments in a persuasive article and how they support the writers intentionUnderstand how the selection of key ideas and events supports the writers argumentBe able to comment on the writers possible intention and develop a personal response to it

    Use video links in Introduction presentation to start lesson. Students read Text 2 (Care about horses?) in the Anthology

    or 2.1 Text 2. Complete the reading for meaning activities on the Reading

    for meaning worksheet 2. A Reading for meaning 2interactive is also available to support this.

    Work through Writers workshop 2 presentation to explorehow the writer uses key ideas to support her argument. This is also supported by a Writers workshop 2 progress check presentation and a Sequencing paragraphs worksheet.

    The Critical writing worksheet provides an opportunity for students to plan and write a response about the extract. The Critical writing: evaluation presentation gives sample answers and supports students in evaluating these.

    3 Understand how the selection of key ideas supports the writers argumentBe able to sequence ideaslogically when writing a persuasive articleUnderstand the importance of reviewing tense, viewpoint and register decisions when writinga persuasive article

    Introduce the task on the Writing task worksheet. Students complete the writing task. This task is also

    supported by the Writing design presentation, a Writinginteractive and a Writing modelling presentation.

    At some point (before, during or after students do their own writing), the sample answer on the worksheet can be used.

    The worksheet and presentations offer additional guidance to help students consider tense, viewpoint and registerdecisions.

    Pearson Education Ltd 2015. Copying permitted for purchasing institution only. This material is not copyright free. 1

    The Teacher Guide is included as part of our ActiveLearn Digital Service and provides overviews and lesson plans to accompany all the resources.

    Includes six exclusive lesson plans to support the Lets Think in English teaching resources on our ActiveLearn Digital Service, to build the confidence and resilience of students when tackling unseen texts.

  • mes, t

    hey were the footprints of a gigantic hound!

    12 13

    Supporting worksheets allow students to try out skills from the Grammar for Writing Workshops in their own writing.

    Grammar for Writing worksheets

    Progress Checks

    Frequent Progress Checks and practice activities help you to monitor how well students have grasped each particular teaching point.

    Developed in partnership with the University of Exeter, Writers Workshop presentations are available for every topic extract in the Text Anthology. These dig deeper into the text and explore how the writer has used particular structural, literary or linguistic features.

    Each topic has a particular skills focus. For example, the first topic of Tier 2 (Topic 2.1) explores how the writers have selected and sequenced ideas. There are then topics in higher tiers using different extracts with a similar but more sophisticated focus.

    The workshops help you to embed the core principles of Debra Myhills Grammar for Writing pedagogy into your teaching and encourage students to explore the choices writers make.

    ActiveLearn Digital Service sample material from Topic 2.1 Animal Welfare

    Grammar for Writing workshops

  • mes, t

    hey were the footprints of a gigantic hound!

    14 15

    Writing tasks

    Every topic ends with a writing task based on the theme of the two extracts, just like the exam. Sample responses for every task encourage evaluation and reflection about the task.

    Every writing task is accompanied by presentations supporting and modelling the writing process.

    ActiveLearn Digital Service sample material from Topic 2.1 Animal Welfare

    Critical Writing

    Sample answers are provided along with presentations which indicate their strengths and weaknesses and help students understand how their own critical responses could be improved.

    Critical writing worksheets enable students to practice responding to the texts they have read developing the analytical and evaluative skills they will need in their exams.

    Three differentiated versions of each worksheet are provided, each with a varying degree of scaffolding.

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    hey were the footprints of a gigantic hound!

    1716

    Revision support

    Help your students get ahead with our market-leading resources for GCSE Revision.

    REVISE EDEXCEL GCSE (9-1)English LanguageREVISION

    GUIDE

    A LWAY S L E A R N I NG

    REVISE EDEXCEL GCSE (9-1)English LanguageREVISION

    WORKBOOK

    A LWAY S L E A R N I NG

    ActiveLearn Digital Service sample material

    Assessment and progression tracking

    Revision Guide Designed for hassle-free classroom and

    independent study with one-topic-per-page format.

    Exam-style worked examples support the new specification whilst practice questions help students test their understanding of a topic.

    Spelling and grammar support is provided in a dedicated skills page and integrated throughout the book.

    Level indicator shows students exactly what level they are working at.

    Revision Workbook One-to-one page match with the

    Revision Guide enables students to find the practice they need quickly and easily.

    Provides loads of practice questions in the style of the new exams, with their own set of accompanying texts.

    Guided support and hints provide additional scaffolding to help students.

    Includes a full set of practice papers written to support the new specification.

    Professional Development Pedagogy Training

    Training workshops to help you understand and apply the Grammar for Writing and Lets Think in English principles into your teaching.We are working in exclusive partnership with experts from the University of Exeter and Kings College London on Professional Development courses to help you make sure your students are prepared for the challenges of the new GCSEs.

    Training developed by Debra Myhills Grammar for Writing team at the University of Exeter will support you in embedding this approach in your teaching.

    The team at Kings College London will provide training on the Lets Think in English approach, which aims to improve confidence and resilience when tackling unseen extracts.

    3. In lines 17 -36, how does the writer use language and structure to show the change in both Mr Podgers and Lord Arthurs moods? Support your views with reference to the text. (6) .. (Total for Question 3 = 6 marks)

    Level Mark

    (A02 descriptor) Indicative of steps

    0

    Nothing to be credited

    Level 1 1-2

    Some comment on

    the language/structure

    used to achieve

    effects and influence readers,

    including use of

    vocabulary.

    Range of reference

    is correct but not

    developed.

    NB The mark awarded

    cannot progress beyond the

    top of Level 1 if only

    language OR structure has

    been considered.

    Step 1 & 2

    Level 2 3-4

    Some explanation of

    how both language

    and structure are

    used to achieve

    effects and influence readers,

    including use of

    vocabulary and

    sentence structure.

    The quotations are

    appropriate and

    supports the points

    being made.

    Step 3, 4, 5, 6

    Level 3 5-6

    Language and structure are

    analysed and

    candidates comment on how

    this has influenced

    the reader. Their

    comments include

    use of vocabulary,

    sentence structure

    and other language

    features.

    The use of quotations are well

    selected and

    illustrate the point

    being made.

    Steps 7 - 12

    Assessment papers with questions and tasks in the style of the new assessments, help to prepare students for their exams.

    Mark schemes will help you to track your students progress and intervene effectively.

    View samples and find out more at www.pearsonschools.co.uk/edgcseenglang2015.

    Twelve practice papers and mark schemes are included on the service in total.

    http://www.pearsonschoolsandfecolleges.co.uk/Secondary/EnglishAndMedia/14-16/EdexcelGCSEEnglishLanguage2015/EdexcelGCSEEnglishLanguage2015.aspx?utm_source=amp&utm_medium=Direct_Mail&utm_campaign=SEC_ENG_01NOV2014_edexcelgcse2015

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    hey were the footprints of a gigantic hound!

    18 19

    Features of the specification Where addressed How addressed

    The assessment of the new GCSE (91) is by 100% terminal examination.

    ActiveLearn Digital Service

    Cumulative approach to learning: consolidating and building on what has been previously taught. Assessment materials: six sets of assessment papers with questions in the style of the new exams. Writing tasks: allow students to practise imaginative and transactional writing.

    Text Anthology Assessment pages: provide practice questions in the style of the new exams.

    Revision resources

    Revision Guide: summary notes in short, memorable chunks; progress check boxes; practice questions. Revision Workbooks: guided exam questions and practice papers.

    The new GCSE is untiered so all students will tackle the same unseen extracts and tasks.

    ActiveLearn Digital Service

    Six differentiated tiers of resources: each supporting a different ability profile; pitched to develop the skills needed by students of each ability.

    Text Anthology Extracts: resources provided for all abilities that are based on extracts from texts typical of those students will encounter in their exams.Students will need to understand challenging unseen texts in the exams, including 19th century fiction.

    ActiveLearn Digital Service

    Hooks: engaging starter resources grab the interest of students, tuning them in to the themes of the extracts. Reading for meaning worksheets: to develop key reading and comprehension skills. Lets Think in English: lessons from Kings College to boost confidence and resilience when tackling unseen extracts.

    Text Anthology Extracts: one hundred extracts, including many nineteenth-century ones. Carefully chosen to engage students and help them to build confidence.

    Professional Development

    Teacher training: courses on the Lets Think in English approach, to improve students confidence, resilience and thinking skills when tackling unseen extracts.

    In the reading section of the exams, students will be required to explain and evaluate how the writer creates effects, including comparison of unseen non-fiction extracts.

    ActiveLearn Digital Service

    Critical writing: differentiated worksheets focusing on the skill of writing critical responses to extracts, some focusing on comparison specifically. Sample answers: every critical writing activity has linked sample answers with commentary. Lets Think in English: Lessons build the skills necessary to understand and analyse writers techniques and discuss them insightfully. Grammar for Writing: Writers Workshops embed this approach throughout the resources, helping students to understand and articulate how writers use language for effect. Reviewed: all the main topic resources reviewed by Debra Myhills team at the University of Exeter offering an ideal progression from our KS3 course called Skills for Writing.

    Text Anthology Assessment pages: provide practice reading questions in the style of the new exams.

    Professional Development

    Teacher training: courses from the University of Exeter and Kings College to help embed the pedagogies

    Students are required to write creative and transactional pieces in the exams, loosely linked to the reading texts.

    ActiveLearn Digital Service

    Writing tasks: every topic ends with a writing task, linked to the extracts in the topic. Grammar for Writing: students develop their literary, structural and language skills in the Writers Workshops and are guided to go on to practise and apply these skills in their own writing. Sample answers: accompany every writing task for students to evaluate and learn from.

    Text Anthology Assessment pages: provide reading and writing practice in the style of the new exams.

    Professional Development

    Teacher training: courses from the University of Exeter to help you to embed the Grammar for Writing approach in your own teaching at KS4.

    New accountability measures underline the importance of securing progress for all students across the ability spectrum.

    ActiveLearn Digital Service

    Assessment materials: six sets of assessment papers and accompanying mark schemes to support you in monitoring the progress your students are making. Checking progress: regular Progress Check resources, included with every topic, provide opportunities to evaluate the extent to which students have mastered the specific skills being taught.

    Teacher Guide (on ActiveLearn Digital Service)

    Lesson plans: fully differentiated plans pitched at different ability profiles, identifying and focusing on the skills that students of different abilities need in order to progress.

    Use this grid to see at-a-glance how we can support you with the changes at GCSE

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    Edexcel GCSE (9-

    1)

    English Language

    Text Anthology

    Emma Curran and

    Helen Lines

    Series consultan

    t: Debra Myhill

    A LWAY S L E A R N

    I NG

    REVISE EDEXCEL

    GCSE (9-1)

    English

    Language

    REVISION

    GUIDE

    A LWAY S L E A R N

    I NG

    REVISE EDEXCEL GCSE (9-1)English LanguageREVISION WORKBOOK

    A LWAY S L E A R N I NG

  • mes, they were the footp

    rints of a gigantic h

    ound!

    Order your FREE Evaluation PackIf you havent already done so, be sure to order your FREE Edexcel GCSE (91) English Language Evaluation Pack (includes an advance copy of the printed Text Anthology and other sample material) available March 2015.

    Order onlineOrder via our website at: www.pearsonschools.co.uk/edgcseenglangep2015

    Email usEmail your order to: [email protected]

    Call usCall our Customer Services team to place an order: 0845 630 3333. Were open Monday Friday 8.00am 5.00pm.

    When ordering please quote the Evaluation Pack ISBN 9781447982548 and your full contact details.

    Pearson Ltd is committed to reducing its impact on the environment by using responsibly sourced and recycled paper.

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    Supports the new KS3 English Curriculum

    Find out more at www.pearsonschools.co.uk/gcsecgskillsforwriting.

    Developed in partnership with Debra Myhill and her team at the University of Exeter, Skills for Writing embeds the principles of the Grammar for Writing pedagogy trialled and proven to almost double the rate of writing progress at KS3. Use Skills for Writing and our Edexcel GCSE (91) English Language resources for a seamless 1116 approach to the new curriculum!

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    in

    Two househ

    olds, both al

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    nity, i

    n fair Verona, where we lay our scene, from ancien

    t grudge break to ne

    w mutiny, wher

    e civil blood makes

    I am what you have made me. Take all the pra

    ise, take all th

    e blame; take

    all

    the success, t

    ake all the fa

    ilure;

    Thats the thing about people who mean everything they say. Whatever we

    call bea

    utiful

    , we q

    uiver before it. And what co

    uld b

    e more terrifying and

    Take another glass of wine, and excuse my

    mentioning that society as a body does not expect one to be so s

    trictly c

    onscientious in emptying one's gla

    ss,

    Those wh

    o find ugly meanings

    in beau

    tiful thin

    gs are c

    orrupt

    Skills for Writing

    Shares the same Grammar

    for Writing methodology used in our

    GCSE resources!

    Also available

    http://www.pearsonschoolsandfecolleges.co.uk/Secondary/EnglishAndMedia/14-16/EdexcelGCSEEnglishLanguage2015/ISBN/Evaluation-Pack/EdexcelGCSEEnglishLanguage2015EvaluationPack.aspx?utm_source=amp&utm_medium=Direct_Mail&utm_campaign=SEC_ENG_01NOV2014_edexcelgcse2015mailto:myorders%40pearson.com?subject=http://www.pearsonschoolsandfecolleges.co.uk/Secondary/EnglishAndMedia/11-14/SkillsforWriting/SkillsforWriting.aspx?utm_source=amp&utm_medium=Direct_Mail&utm_campaign=SEC_ENG_01NOV2014_edexcelgcse2015