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Edexcel A GCSE Geography 2013-2015 Teachers of Geography GCSE: Mrs C Winsor [email protected] Ms K Goraj [email protected] Examination Board: Edexcel (www.edexcel.com) Specification: Geography A

Edexcel A GCSE Geography 2013-2015fluencycontent2-schoolwebsite.netdna-ssl.com/FileCluster/SloughAndEton/...Edexcel A GCSE Geography 2013-2015 Teachers of Geography GCSE: Mrs C Winsor

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  • Edexcel A GCSE Geography 2013-2015

    Teachers of Geography GCSE: Mrs C Winsor [email protected]

    Ms K Goraj [email protected]

    Examination Board: Edexcel (www.edexcel.com)

    Specification: Geography A

    mailto:[email protected]:[email protected]

  • Exams and summary of assessment

    Unit/Module Number and

    Name

    Unit/Module Description Percentage towards final grade

    Unit 1

    (Answer All Questions)

    Geographical Skills and Challenges

    ‘Geographical Skills’ and ‘Challenges for the Planet’

    Provisional exam date May 13th 2014.

    25% - EXAM

    Unit 2

    (Answer all questions in section A and 1 in section B)

    The Physical World

    ‘Coastal Landscapes’, ‘ River Landscapes’, ‘ Tectonic Processes’ and ‘A watery World’

    Provisional exam date Thursday May 22nd 2014

    25% - EXAM

    Unit 3

    (Answer all questions in section A and 1 in section B)

    The Human Word

    ‘Economic Change’, Settlement Change’, Population Change’ and ‘A Tourist’s world’

    Provisional exam date Friday June 6th 2014

    25% Exam

    Unit 4 Geographical Investigation

    This is the write-up of the Swanage Bay trip. It involves an Introduction, Method, Data Presentation, Data Analysis and Evaluation.

    The Data Analysis and Evaluation are both completed in class under a high level of control.

    All the other sections are completed by pupils under low level of Control. The help sheets for these are on fronter.

    THE DEADLINE FOR COMPLETION IS OCTOBER 24th

    25% controlled Assessment

  • Spelling, Punctuation and Grammar (SPaG)

    Why has SPaG been introduced? In 2011, the Department for Education announced that SPaG would be introduced into the assessment of four GCSE qualifications: English Literature, History, Geography and Religious Studies. In each of these qualifications 5% of the total marks must be allocated to the assessment of candidates’ spelling, punctuation and grammar. Therefore, for GCSE Geography A, with a total of 200 marks, 5% of the total is 10 marks for SPaG.

    How has SPaG been applied? In Edexcel’s GCSE Geography A, SPaG marks will be assessed in Section B of Units 1, 2 and 3. SPaG is not assessed in Unit 4 (controlled assessment). Marks for Quality of Written Communication (QWC) remain unchanged throughout the GCSE Geography A qualification. SPaG marks are allocated across Units 1, 2 and 3 in order to give candidates an opportunity to be rewarded for their SPaG across different elements of the subject, rather than having all of the SPaG marks in just one unit examination. The SPaG marks have been allocated to the question within each section that offers the most opportunity for the use of extensive technical vocabulary and gives candidates an opportunity to demonstrate their writing skills.

    When is the first assessment of SPaG? For GCSE Geography A, SPaG will first be assessed in January 2013. Exemplar questions and mark schemes are available in this guide and further materials will be added to the website over time. www.edexcel.com/gcse2012geography

    How will SPaG be made clear on the exam paper? There will be an instruction for candidates on the front cover of the exam paper, as well as before any question that have SPaG marks available. Beneath the question it will indicate how many marks are available for SPaG for that question.

    This is how it will be marked

  • Course content and Checklists

    Unit 1 - Geographical Skills and Challenges

    Geographical Skills

    What I need to know I could answer a question on this

    I know this but I am not that confident

    I would not be able to answer a question on this

    Basic Skills I can label and annotate diagrams, maps, graphs and sketches I can draw sketches from photographs and in the field I can use and interpret aerial, oblique and satellite photographs for different landscapes

    I can write coherently, showing the importance of good literacy skills in expressing geographical points.

    Cartographic skills Atlas maps I can recognise and describe distributions and patterns of both human and physical features.

    Sketch maps I can draw, label, annotate, understand and interpret sketch maps. Ordnance Survey maps (1:50 000 scale) I can recognise symbols (using a key), four- and six-figure grid references, and straight line and winding distances

    I can demonstrate an understanding of direction, using an eight-point compass

    I can demonstrate understanding of the construction of cross-sections I can complete and annotate cross-sections, indicating height and degree of slope and simple contour patterns

    I can recognise and describe patterns of vegetation, land use and communications

    I can describe and identify the site, situation and shape of settlements I can recognise and describe distributions and patterns of both human and physical features

    I can infer human activity from map evidence, including tourism I can use maps in association with photographs, sketches and written directions.

    Graphical skills I can construct and complete a variety of graphs, charts and maps I can interpret a variety of graphs, including those located on maps and topological diagrams.

    Geographical enquiry skills I can identify, analyse and evaluate geographical questions, hypotheses and issues

    I can establish appropriate sequences of investigation and follow appropriate enquiry approaches

    I can extract and interpret information from a range of sources including field observations, maps, drawings, photographs, diagrams and tables and secondary sources

    I can describe, analyse and interpret evidence I can draw and justify conclusions from evidence I can evaluate methods of data collection, presentation and analysis of evidence.

    ICT skills I can collect and annotate photographs and satellite images I can use databases such as census and population data I can use the internet, eg to investigate case studies of volcanic eruptions, floods

  • I can extract information from video and television programmes I can carry out data presentation and analysis techniques I can use spreadsheets and data-handling software I can research and present investigative work. Geographical Information System (GIS) skills I can capture and represent geographical information in systems such as Aegis

    I can use web mapping sites such as Google Earth and Multimap.

    Challenges for the Planet

    What I need to know I could answer a question on this

    I know this but I am not that confident

    I would not be able to answer a question on this

    The causes, effects and responses to climate change I know how and why climate has changed since the last ice age. I know how the climate has changed in the last 10 000 years to the present day.

    I know how volcanic activity has affected climate I know how orbital geometry has affected climate I know how variations in solar output has affected climate I know the causes of current climate change on a local and global scale, including the burning fossil fuels and the increase of methane in the atmosphere.

    I know examples of causes of climate change which illustrate the actions of the individuals such as increase in car ownership and groups of people such as energy producers.

    I know the negative effects that climate change is having on the environment and people, including changing patterns of crop yield, rising sea levels and retreating glaciers, on a local and global scale.

    I know a variety of effects at a local and global scale. Including the impact on food production, the threat to areas at sea level including small islands and the threat to marine environments such as coral reefs.

    I know the responses to climate change, from a local to a global scale, eg ‘live simply’ campaigns to world superpower meetings (Bali in 2007).

    I know there is a range of responses to climate change from; on a global scale the response of government, to the responses of individuals at a local scale.

    I know the detail of global meetings, eg Bali in 2007, and local campaigns. Sustainable development for the planet I know contrasting definitions and interpretations of sustainable development.

    I know The concept of sustainable development in large organisations such as the development of policies by large organisations to make them more sustainable. Specific detail of examples which range from within the workplace such as recycling bins to reduction of air pollution in manufacturing industries.

    I know the management of transport in urban areas, including the public versus private debate A range of sustainable transport schemes to be studied in different urban areas, eg park and ride, congestion charging.

    I know the effects of resource extraction from tropical rainforests and their management. A range of resource extraction examples from tropical rainforest environments with contrasting management initiatives, eg oil extraction in Oriente, Ecuador, palm oil production in Papua New Guinea.

  • Unit 2 –The Natural Environment

    Coastal Landscapes

    What I need to know I could answer a question on this

    I know this but I am not that confident

    I would not be able to answer a question on this

    Section A: The Physical World. COASTAL LANDSCAPES Coastal Processes produce Landforms I can describe the Characteristics of destructive and constructive waves Understand the impacts of Biological, physical and Chemical weathering. I know the 4 types of erosion (Corrosion, Corrasion, Hydraulic Action and Attrition) I know the 2 types of mass movement on the coast (Slumping and Soil creep) I can describe and explain formation of cliffs, and wave-cut platforms, headlands and bays, caves, arches, stacks and stumps.

    I can recognise impacts of Long Shore Drift on the coastline and draw a diagram. I can describe and explain the formation of beaches, spits and bars Coastal Landforms are subject to Change I can explain how fetch, Geology and vegetation affect cliff recession I can explain the effects of cliff recession on people and the environment I can describe and explain how recession affects the North Norfolk Coastline I can Explain examples of other areas where cliff recession is occurring (Dawlish, westward Ho! Barton-on-sea, )

    I can explain how forecasting, building design, planning and education can reduce coastal flooding.

    I can understand the difference between soft and hard coastal defence techniques I can explain the advantages and disadvantages of; Rip rap, sea wall, Groynes, gabions, Offshore Reefs, Beach replenishment, Cliff regarding, Managed retreat

    1.3 Coastal management I can describe and explain coastal recession at Walton-on-the-Naze River Landscapes

    What I need to know I could answer a question on this

    I know this but I am not that confident

    I would not be able to answer a question on this

    Section A: The Physical World. River Landscapes River processes produce distinctive landforms I can define the drainage basin terms: watershed, confluence, tributary, source and mouth and recognise them on a photo/diagram.

    Understand the impacts of Biological, physical and Chemical weathering. I know the 4 types of erosion (Corrosion, Corrasion, Hydraulic Action and Attrition) I know the 2 types of mass movement (Slumping and Soil creep) I know the change in characteristics (width, depth, velocity, discharge and gradient) of a river and its valley from source to mouth. (Bradshaw model)

    I can describe and explain the formation of interlocking spurs, waterfalls, meanders, river-cliffs, oxbow lakes, flood plains and levees.

    Flooding and flood prevention I can explain the physical and human causes of river flooding such as Urbanisation, deforestation and intensity of rainfall.

    I can give the effects of river flooding on people and the environment using examples.

    I know how prediction and prevention of the effects of river flooding by forecasting, building design, planning and education can reduce risk.

    I know the types of hard and soft engineering used to control rivers in the UK

  • and the advantages and disadvantages of these techniques. Define hard and soft engineering. The main types of defence used on UK rivers should be studied, including embankments, channelisation, flood relief channels, flood plain zoning, washlands, dams, and flood warning systems.

    1.3 Coastal management How a river is managed in a named location. River Nene)

    Tectonic Processes

    What I need to know I could answer a question on this

    I know this but I am not that confident

    I would not be able to answer a question on this

    Section A: The Physical World. Tectonic Landscapes 3.1 Location and characteristics of tectonic activity I know the world distribution of earthquakes and volcanoes. I know the reasons why earthquakes and volcanoes occur where they do, through an explanation of plate tectonics and hotspots.

    I know the characteristic features of convergent, divergent and conservative plate boundaries.

    I know the measurement of earthquake magnitude (the Mercalli and Richter scales) and diagrams, showing characteristics of focus and epicentre.

    Management of the effects of tectonic activity I know the reasons why people continue to live in areas of volcanic and earthquake activity. (Social, Economic and Environmental effects)

    The causes and effects of a volcanic eruption or an earthquake on people and the environment, in a named location.

    Prediction and prevention of the effects of volcanic eruptions and earthquakes by forecasting, the design of buildings and defences, planning and education.

    A Watery World

    What I need to know I could answer a question on this

    I know this but I am not that confident

    I would not be able to answer a question on this

    Water consumption and sources I know the differences between low-income countries (LICs) and high-income countries (HICs) water consumption; domestic, agriculture and industry.

    I know the percentage used by agriculture, industry and domestic in HICs and LICs.

    I know reasons for these differences in water usage eg domestic – dishwasher versus handwash, agriculture – different forms of irrigation, sprinklers in HICs versus buckets in LICs, industry – varying scales between HICs (factories) and LICs (cottage).

    I know greater wealth and increasing levels of development are major contributors to increasing water consumption.

    I know the range of demands for water is continually increasing in HICs from the ‘showering society’ to the use of labour saving equipment such as washing machines. The developing demands of the leisure and tourism industry from the use of water on golf courses and swimming pools.

    I know on a local scale where we obtain our water from; reservoirs, aquifers and rivers.

    I know the availability of water on a local scale at the example of Kielder Water. I know water surplus and deficit on a world scale are related to global rainfall patterns. I know the global pattern of rainfall and the relationship with water

  • surpluses and deficits. Water supply problems I know water supply problems in HICs, including availability, quality, spatial and seasonal variability and loss through broken pipes.

    I have considered the problems associated with water supply in HICs such as the imbalance of rainfall and population between north and south in the UK.

    I know there is a seasonal imbalance in rainfall on the Spanish Costas. Victorian water pipes in London cause leakage.

    I know water supply problems in LICs, including lack of available ‘clean’ piped water, waterborne disease and water pollution.

    I can consider the problems associated with water supply in LICs. I know a large proportion of the population in LICs have access to only untreated water, this leads to problems such as disease (typhoid and cholera) and pollution of water courses through resource exploitation.

    Management of water usage and resources I know how water is managed in HICs, in domestic, industrial and agricultural contexts.

    I know domestic management includes metering, short flush toilets, and hose pipe bans.

    I know industrial management at Cadbury’s and Walkers crisps and know ways that industries save water (new manufacturing techniques, eg steel and recycling)

    I know in agricultural industries they use different forms of irrigation such as drip irrigation and furrows.

    I know in LICs, appropriate technology is needed for water supply in small communities. Such as Hand dug wells, rainwater harvesting, gravity fed schemes, and tubewells and boreoles and recycling.

    I know examples of water management such as appropriate technology in villages in Africa, eg bore holes and recycled sewage water in Kolkata, India.

    I know the management of water resources, through examples I know a dispute between countries, or areas within a country, over water transfer. I know how Turkey damming the Euphrates causing tension with Syria and Iraq (Tigris-Euphrates)

    I know the case study of the Three Gorges dam water management scheme, explaining the reasons for the scheme and the positive and negative effects of the scheme on people and the environment.

    Unit 3 – The Human Environment

    Economic Change What I need to know I could

    answer a question on this

    I know this but I am not that confident

    I would not be able to answer a question on this

    Changes to different economic sectors I know the relative importance of the primary, secondary and tertiary sectors in countries at different levels of development; change over time and space.

    I know reasons for the decline in numbers employed in the primary sector in the UK, including: i depletion of resources ii cheap imports iii mechanisation iv social change.

    I know reasons for the decline in the secondary sector in the UK, including: i globalisation and cheaper production overseas ii mechanisation iii government policies.

    I know a study of the growth of the secondary sector in one low-income country (LIC) or middle-income country (MIC). (China)

    I know reasons for the dramatic growth of the tertiary sector since 1970, including:

  • i a rise in the demand for services linked to disposable incomes ii the development of new technologies and services iii decrease in employment in the primary and secondary sectors iv demographic changes, e.g. the ageing population. Economic locations I know factors affecting the location of primary, secondary and tertiary activity illustrate these factors by reference to an activity in each sector. (China Clay, Toyota, David Lloyd)

    I know the costs and benefits of de-industrialisation in rural areas. (Eden project, Aberfen, Reading)

    Settlement Change What I need to know I could

    answer a question on this

    I know this but I am not that confident

    I would not be able to answer a question on this

    Factors affecting settlements I know how settlements have developed in order to carry out different functions in society. These functions vary both from place to place and over time as societies change and develop.

    Changes to rural communities caused by: i counter-urbanisation ii the depopulation of remote rural areas.

    Changing land use in urban areas I know how land use in urban areas in the UK is changing, largely in response to the need for more housing and deindustrialisation.

    I know the reasons for (social, economic and political) and consequences of the need for more housing, including the use of brownfield and greenfield sites, and urban sprawl.

    I know the consequences of deindustrialisation, including the redevelopment and renewal of derelict and brownfield sites.

    I know the advantages and disadvantages of brownfield and greenfield sites. Rapid growth in LICs I know the reasons for the rapid growth of urban areas in LICs.

    A study of an LIC urban area to assess the effects of this rapid growth. Population Change What I need to know I could

    answer a question on this

    I know this but I am not that confident

    I would not be able to answer a question on this

    Population growth and distribution I know the growth and distribution of global population. I know reasons for changes to birth and death rates, including study of the demographic transition model.

    I know the physical and human factors affecting the distribution and density of population in China and the UK.

    I know how two countries cope with contrasting population problems, one trying to increase and the other trying to decrease the birth rate.

    Characteristics of population I know the characteristics of population on a local scale including age, gender, ethnic, religious and occupational structure.

    I know comparison of population pyramids for three countries at different levels of development.

    I know the consequences of youthful and ageing populations. I know a study of the advantages and disadvantages of an ageing population within a country.

    A Tourist’s World

  • What I need to know I could answer a question on this

    I know this but I am not that confident

    I would not be able to answer a question on this

    Growth of the Tourist Industry I know the social, economic and political causes of the growth in tourism. I know the Global factors causing tourist growth, social (greater leisure time), economic (greater disposable income) and political (relaxing of borders in EU).

    I know that holiday destinations offer a variety of physical and human attractions. The area has physical attractions, eg snow for skiing, sand and sun for beach holiday and human attractions such as temples, museums, shops and restaurants.

    I know that there are different types of holiday. The types of holiday may include package, adventure, wedding and backpacking

    Resort development

    I know the Butler model of resort development. I know the terminology used in the Butler model and I recognise it as a diagram

    I know the development of Blackpool related to the Butler model I know the development of a Blackpool from its origin to present day.

    Effects of tourist industry growth I know the social, economic and environmental effects of the growth of tourism in countries at different levels of development (positive and negative effects).

    I know the impact can be economic (tourism can lead to an increase in jobs in primary, secondary and tertiary sectors; seasonality of employment), social (new entertainment facilities; fracturing of communities by second home owners) and environmental (protected areas, eg national parks; vegetation and footpath destruction.)

    I know the impacts of tourism in Ayia Napa, Cyprus and Zanzibar and Malham, Uk. I know these are countries of differing levels of development

    Eco-tourism I know how Gambia is an eco-tourist destination and can show how tourism can protect the environment and benefit the local community.

    Unit 4: Geographical Investigation This is the controlled assessment worth 25%.The total marks for this section are 50. There are 6 sections that you have to complete. Section A – 6 marks Assessment criterion a − purpose of investigation No location or issue identified. 0 The issue or question is weakly identified. Location is mentioned but unclear.

    1-2

    A clear statement identifies the issue or question. The location is established.

    3-4

    A well-focused statement that identifies and contextualises the issue or question. The location is focused on the place of the investigation.

    5-6

    Examiner tips

    • The majority of candidates do not locate their data collection effectively. The data

  • collection sites can be clearly shown by a detailed map or by the use of six-figure grid references. • The candidate is required to provide a clear purpose of the investigation. The

    majority of Centres and candidates find that this is most effectively achieved by sub-dividing the task question into a series of sub-questions or mini-hypotheses.

    Section B – 9 Marks

    Assessment criterion b − methods of collecting data There is no evidence of data collected or method(s) of collection. 0 There is limited evidence of primary and secondary data collected by the student. There is little explanation of why the methods were used to collect primary and secondary data. The contribution of the student to the primary data collection is briefly described. Limited evidence of risk assessment. No obvious evidence of the use of GIS to gather data.

    1-3

    The primary and secondary data has been collected by the student and is appropriate for the investigation. There is some explanation of why the methods were used to collect primary and secondary data. The contribution of the student to the primary data collection is clearly described. Clear evidence of risk assessment having been undertaken. Some limited use of GIS to collect information.

    4-6

    The primary and secondary data has been accurately collected by the student and is appropriate for the investigation. There is detailed explanation of why the methods were used to collect primary and secondary data. The contribution of the student to the primary data collection is described in detail. Clear reference to risk assessment, explicitly linked to the investigation. Use of GIS is clear and well linked to chosen issue or question.

    7-9

    Examiners Tips

    • The data collection must be described in detail to reach the higher mark ranges. Points such as the number of sites, the reasons for their selection, sampling techniques and the equipment used, should be included.

    Section C – 11 Marks C - Methods of presenting data There is no evidence of data presentation. 0 A limited range of basic presentation techniques is used. The methods used are usually not appropriate 1-4 A range of mainly appropriate data-presentation techniques are used. Techniques are well presented, scales, titles present on most techniques. At the top of this level, some of the techniques should be more sophisticated.

    5-8

    A wide range of presentation techniques, well presented and appropriate. Techniques are well presented, scales, titles present on most techniques. A number of the presentation methods will be more sophisticated.

    9-11

    Examiner Tips

    • Candidates should be encouraged accurately to locate photographs and field sketches. This might be achieved by reference to data collection sites or by providing six-figure grid references.

    Section D – 9 Marks D -Analysis and conclusions Marks There is no analysis or conclusion. 0 0 Data has been extracted and described. Some basic conclusions have been drawn which vaguely relate to the question or issue investigated.

    1-3

    Data is described in some detail with analytical comments. Plausible conclusions are reached using the evidence which is presented in the investigation report

    4-6

    There are analytical comments, which draw together the student’s findings. The conclusions are accurate and substantiated and refer to the correct theory where appropriate.

    7-9

    Examiner Tips

    • Candidates must give detailed statements, supported with the relevant evidence that they have collected to draw conclusions

  • Section E – 9 Marks E−Evaluation Marks There is no evaluation. 0 There is limited evaluation of the investigation. Either all aspects of the investigation have been evaluated in limited detail or some aspects of the investigation have been evaluated in more detail.

    1-3

    There is evaluation of the investigation which varies in completeness between the aspects. Some of the limitations of the evidence collected have been recognised.

    4-6

    There is detailed evaluation of the investigation which reflects on the limitations of the evidence collected.

    7-9

    Examiners Tips

    • Ensure that the students know, before they start this high level of control section, that they must evaluate more than just their data collection. Encourage the students to write a reasonable amount, an evaluation only half a page in length is unlikely to reach a higher mark range.

    Section F – 6 Marks Assessment criterion f* − planning and organisation The investigation report lacks any planning or organisation. Geographical terminology is absent. Spelling, punctuation and grammar errors are very frequent.

    0

    The work may be incomplete and not fully organised into a logical sequence. Geographical terminology may not be used accurately or is inappropriate. Spelling, punctuation and grammar errors are very frequent.

    1-2

    There is a sequence of enquiry in the investigation report. Content is clear, for example page numbers are all present. The student spells, punctuates and uses the rules of grammar with some accuracy. Geographical terminology is used appropriately in the investigation report.

    3-4

    Students must be within the word limit to achieve this level. An organised and well-structured report, showing the correct sequence of enquiry followed. Diagrams are integrated into the text with appropriate subheadings. Grammar, punctuation and spelling errors are almost nonexistent. Clear and accurate use of geographical terminology to support the work.

    5-6

    Examiners Tips

    • Encourage the candidates to proofread their completed work. Candidates are more likely to use

    an extensive geographical vocabulary. Key terms can be introduced and defined as part of the purpose of the investigation.

    Approximate Grade Boundaries for each unit

    Higher Paper code Subject Unit Total A* A B C D E 5GA1H Geography A1 50 42 38 34 31 26 23 5GA2H Geography A2 50 42 38 34 30 25 22 5GA3H Geography A3 50 45 42 39 36 30 27

  • Foundation Paper Code Subject Unit Total C D E F G 5GA1F Geography A1 50 32 28 24 21 18 5GA2F Geography A2 50 35 31 27 24 21 5GA3F Geography A3 50 37 33 29 25 21 Controlled Assessment Paper Code Subject Unit Total A* A B C D E F G 5GA04 Geography A4 50 42 38 34 31 26 21 16 11

    Assessment Objectives

    Assessment Objectives % WEIGHTING AO1 Recall, select and communicate their knowledge and understanding of places, environments and concepts.

    30-40%

    AO2 Apply their knowledge and understanding in familiar and unfamiliar contexts.

    30-40%

    AO3 Select and use a variety of skills, techniques and technologies to investigate, analyse and evaluate questions and issues.

    30-40%

    Weighting of the Assessment Objectives for GCSE Full Course The table below shows the approximate weighting of each of the Assessment Objectives in the GCSE units.

    Assessment Objectives

    Unit Weighting % Overall Weighting of

    AOs Unit 1 Unit 2 Unit 3 Unit 4

    AO1 9% 8% 11% 4% 32% A02 9% 10% 8% 4.5% 31.5% A03 7% 7% 6% 16.5% 36.5%

    Overall Weighting of

    Units

    25% 25% 25% 25% 100%

    Reading list and Text books

  • This is the series of books that we use in class the new spec revision guide is published September 2013.

    Tomorrow’s Geography for Edexcel A

    Throughout the year you will be issued with revision guides at the relevant time near your exams

    Below are some other books you can look at to extend your learning

    ‘WARNING’ - Remember the case studies we learn are specific to the questions you could get asked – It is good to learn about more but make sure they are relevant to the questions you could get asked. If you are unsure just ask your teacher.

    ISBN – 9781-8469-0500-1

    ISBN – 9781-4469-0085-7

    http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/images/1444115332/ref=dp_image_0?ie=UTF8&n=266239&s=bookshttp://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/images/1444115340/ref=dp_image_0?ie=UTF8&n=266239&s=books