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Drinks, Desserts, Snacks, Eating Out, and Salt Session 3 Assessment Background Information Tips Goals

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Page 1: Drinks, Desserts, Snacks, Eating Out, and Salt...the typical Americans’ sugar intake is from sugar-sweetened drinks. Û Sugars add lots of extra calories, but no nutrition (they

Drinks, Desserts, Snacks, Eating Out, and Salt

Session 3

Assessment

Background Information

Tips

Goals

Page 2: Drinks, Desserts, Snacks, Eating Out, and Salt...the typical Americans’ sugar intake is from sugar-sweetened drinks. Û Sugars add lots of extra calories, but no nutrition (they
Page 3: Drinks, Desserts, Snacks, Eating Out, and Salt...the typical Americans’ sugar intake is from sugar-sweetened drinks. Û Sugars add lots of extra calories, but no nutrition (they

53© 2017 UNC-CH Center for Health Promotion and Disease Prevention Drinks, Desserts, Snacks, Eating Out, & Salt

Drinks, Desserts, Snacks, Eating Out, and Salt

Assessment

On an average DAY,

In an average WEEK, how many servings of these foods do you eat?

In an average WEEK...

1a. How many 12-ounce servings of sugar-sweetened beverages do you drink? Sugar-sweetened beverages include regular sodas, bottled fruit drinks, and Kool-Aid (including drinks like Coke™, Pepsi™, Sprite™, Snapple™, lemonade, or fruitade and sports or energy drinks). Do NOT include coffee or tea, or beverages with artificial sweeteners like Crystal Light.

0 1 2+

1b. How many 12-ounce servings of iced tea or coffee do you drink a day? ____________If 1 or more, answer the next question.

Is the iced tea or coffee unsweetened (include artificially sweetened), half sweetened, or sweet tea or coffee?

un-

sweetened

half

sweetened

sweet tea or coffee

1c. How many cups of hot tea or coffee do you drink per day? __________ If 1 or more, answer the next question.

How much sugar do you add to each cup (do not include artificial sweeteners)?

None

1-2

teaspoons

3+

teaspoons

2. Doughnuts, sweet rolls, pies, cakes, cookies,or candy (do not include dark chocolate)

0-1 2-3 4+

3. Frozen desserts like ice cream, ice milk, sherbet, or frozenyogurt

0-2 3-4 5+

4. Snack chips (like potato chips, corn chips, tortilla chips, orcheese puffs), crackers, or pretzels

0-2 3-4 5+

5. How many times do you eat out at restaurants, get fooddelivered, or get carry-out from restaurants? (Includefast-food restaurants.)

0-2 3-4 5+

DesirableCould be improved

Needs to be improved

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Background Information

54 Drinks, Desserts, Snacks, Eating Out, & Salt © 2017 UNC-CH Center for Health Promotion and Disease Prevention

Drinks, Desserts, Snacks, Eating Out,

and Salt

Why Should I Limit Sugar-Sweetened Drinks, Like Regular Soda, Sports and Energy Drinks, and Sweet Tea?Sugar-sweetened drinks contain a lot of sugar to make them taste good. It is the high sugar content that makes these drinks unhealthy for everyone and raises the blood sugar for those with diabetes. About ½ of the typical Americans’ sugar intake is from sugar-sweetened drinks.

Û Sugars add lots of extra calories, but no nutrition (they don’t have vitamins, minerals, fiber, etc.). An average 12-ounce soda has 140 calories, which is about 9 teaspoons of sugar.

Û Sugar-sweetened drinks don’t make you feel full, leaving you hungry and wanting more food. Û Drinking sugar-sweetened drinks each day can increase your risk of becoming overweight or

developing diabetes.

How Do I Know if My Drink Has Added Sugar?One way to do this is by checking the drink label for sugars. Also, common types of sugar-sweetened drinks include:

Û Non-diet sodas (soft drinks) Û Fruit punch and lemonade Û Sports and energy drinks

Û Sweet tea Û Kool-Aid™ Û Sweetened coffee drinks

If I Limit Sugar-Sweetened Drinks, What Can I Drink Instead?When people hear they should limit sugar-sweetened drinks, they often ask, “What can I drink instead?” In fact, there are many options that don’t have a lot of added sugar, including:

Û Plain water, with a twist of lemon or lime for a fresh taste. Û Carbonated water (Seltzer water) mixed with a splash of 100%

fruit juice. Û A small amount of 100% fruit juice (half a cup). Û Plain milk. Û Unsweetened or lightly sweetened iced tea, hot or herbal tea, or coffee. If you need to sweeten your tea

or coffee, 1 to 2 teaspoons of sugar per cup or glass is okay. Half and half or milk are OK too.

Limitsodas and

other sugarydrinks.

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Background Information

55© 2017 UNC-CH Center for Health Promotion and Disease Prevention Drinks, Desserts, Snacks, Eating Out, & Salt

Drinks, Desserts, Snacks, Eating Out, and Salt

What Else Should I Know About Choosing Drinks?

Û In some studies, artificial sweeteners seem to cause weight gain and increase the risk for diabetes. So it is best to limit diet sodas and use of artificial sweeteners in tea or coffee to once a day or less (or not drink artificially sweetened drinks at all).

Û Small amounts of alcohol are okay. Some studies suggest a small amount of alcohol may reduce the risk of heart disease and most studies suggest small amounts of alcohol do not cause harm. ✦ A small amount of alcohol is 1 drink per day for a woman or

up to 2 drinks per day for a man.✦ A drink is 5 ounces of wine, 12 ounces of beer, or 1.5 ounces

of liquor.✦ Alcohol is not recommended as a way to avoid heart disease

because of its other effects. For instance, even small amountsof alcohol in women may increase a woman’s chance of getting breast cancer. Additionally, drinkinglarge amounts has many other harmful effects.

Now that you’ve learned about how to choose healthier drinks, it is time to learn some more about desserts, sweets, and snacks.

Desserts, Sweets, and SnacksAs you have been learning, making healthy food choices doesn’t mean you can’t enjoy what you eat. There are many foods that are naturally sweet or enjoyable and are still good for you.

How Can I Enjoy Desserts and Sweets and Still Eat Healthy?You can eat desserts and sweets and still have a healthy diet. Whether you have diabetes or not, think carefully about what type of sweets to eat and how much and how often. About 1/3 of Americans’ sugar intake comes from snacks and sweets. So, it is a good idea to fill up on healthy foods, so that you are not as hungry for desserts and sweets.

Here are some tips for enjoying desserts and sweets:

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Background Information

56 Drinks, Desserts, Snacks, Eating Out, & Salt © 2017 UNC-CH Center for Health Promotion and Disease Prevention

Drinks, Desserts, Snacks, Eating Out,

and Salt

Û Save sweets for special occasions (birthdays and holidays) and a couple of times per week or less.

Û Try eating fruit as a naturally sweet and healthy dessert.

Û Chocolate may reduce the risk of heart disease and dark chocolate may be better for your heart than regular chocolate. ✦ A small amount of dark chocolate (more than

50% cocoa solids), such as half to one ounce,is a good choice for dessert.

✦ The higher the cocoa solid content, the less sugar. For those with diabetes, 70% cocoa or higher isbest.

Û In general, stay away from store-bought doughnuts, sweet rolls, pies, cakes, cookies, caramel candies, and cream-filled desserts. These foods have lots of sugar.

Û Try making your own desserts (See pages 76-91 in Cookbook.)

How Can I Enjoy Snacks and Still Eat Healthy?There is nothing wrong with eating snacks between meals. As you’ve heard before, fruits, vegetables, and nuts are good snack choices. But, many people crave other snacks such as chips and crackers.

It is okay to eat chips and crackers now and then. Healthier options for snack chips and crackers can be found in most stores.

Here are some tips for healthier chip and crackers choices: Û Choose chips and crackers that are made with vegetable oils. Û Consider the lightly salted options. Û For crackers, choose whole wheat or whole grains. Û Pay attention to portion size since it is easy to overdo it on

the chips. Take a small serving out of the bag and then close the bag and put it away.

Û Try making popcorn at home. It’s easy, does not cost much, and tastes great. You can even try adding your own spices.

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Background Information

57© 2017 UNC-CH Center for Health Promotion and Disease Prevention Drinks, Desserts, Snacks, Eating Out, & Salt

Drinks, Desserts, Snacks, Eating Out, and Salt

Eating OutWhen eating away from home it is often hard to make healthy choices. Knowing what to eat at restaurants can be especially hard. In this section, we review ways to eat out and still be good to your heart.

What Are Some Healthier Choices I Can Make When Eating Out?Fast food can be convenient, tasty, and doesn’t cost a lot, but many options at fast food restaurants are not healthy.

If you eat at fast food restaurants, remember:

Û Stay away from the large or “supersized” sugar-sweetened beverages. Consider other drink options reviewed earlier in this section.

Û Select healthy sides like fruit cups or side salad.

Û Order whole wheat bread or buns if available, rather than white bread.

Û Ask for the Nutrition Facts sheet to help make the best choices. Û At fast food restaurants, spicy often means salty. Check the menu item and if it has more than 1000 mg

of sodium, consider ordering something else that has less sodium.

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Background Information

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Drinks, Desserts, Snacks, Eating Out,

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When You Eat at Sit-Down Restaurants:

Û If you think you may not finish the meal, ask for a take-away container when you first get your meal, so you will not be tempted to “clean your plate” when you are full.

Û Avoid all-you-can-eat buffets or, if you eat at one, have a good plan about what you will eat.

What Are Some Other Strategies for Eating Out?When eating out, there may not be as many healthy options as you’d like. So it’s important to have a plan for picking the most healthful foods. Planning ahead is especially important if you are eating fast food.

To make healthy choices when dining out, Û Limit sugar sweetened beverages. Û For breakfast, try eggs on a whole wheat muffin or with whole wheat toast. Û Enjoy a burger or sandwich as your meal, on a whole wheat bun or bread, if available. Û Pizza with veggies is a reasonable choice. Û Most entrees at sit down restaurants are

fine. Û Consider a side other than fries

or potatoes, such as salad, fruit, or vegetables. Or consider ordering a large salad for your meal.

Û If you order fries or dessert, get a small portion or share a larger one.

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Background Information

59© 2017 UNC-CH Center for Health Promotion and Disease Prevention Drinks, Desserts, Snacks, Eating Out, & Salt

Drinks, Desserts, Snacks, Eating Out, and Salt

What About Sodium (Salt)?Experts are not sure how much sodium is best for heart health, but most agree that large amounts of sodium should be avoided.

To lower the amount of salt you are eating, keep in mind that most of the salt in your diet comes from processed and restaurant foods rather than from the salt shaker.

Û If you follow the food suggestions in this program and do not eat out very often (often is more than twice a week), your sodium intake will likely be fine.

Û When eating at fast food restaurants, try to keep the total sodium amount of each meal less than 1500 mg. Most fast food restaurants have lists with sodium content of all menu items.

Û At fast food restaurants, spicy often means salty. Check the menu item and if it has more than 1000 mg of sodium, consider ordering something else that has less sodium.

Û Avoid regular consumption of food high in sodium. Û If you eat canned vegetables or beans, it is best to use the lower

sodium option.

Which Types of Foods Are Usually High in Salt?The following processed foods are high in sodium:

Û Boxed and frozen dinners (like macaroni & cheese or Hamburger Helper®)

Û Canned soups and vegetables Û Frozen vegetables with sauces Û Frozen pizzas Û Cheese sauces Û Bacon, ham, sausage, hot dogs

Limit High Salt Boxed

Dinners

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Background Information

60 Drinks, Desserts, Snacks, Eating Out, & Salt © 2017 UNC-CH Center for Health Promotion and Disease Prevention

Drinks, Desserts, Snacks, Eating Out,

and Salt

SummaryHere is a summary of key points from Drinks, Desserts, Snacks, Eating Out, and Salt.

 Try to limit the amount of sugar-sweetened beverages you drink, because they add calories and no nutrition. If you drink 2 or more sugar-sweetened beverages per day, reducing the amount you drink to 1or less per day is one of the most important changes you can make to improve your health. Also, it is best to avoid using artificial sweeteners.

 Go easy on desserts and sweets, and try fruit instead.

 Choose healthier snack food options.

 Make smart choices when eating out at restaurants, and try to eat out less often.

 Be careful about the amount of salt that is in processed and restaurant foods.

What Can I Use Instead of Salt to Season My Food?Lowering salt doesn’t have to mean poor taste. Many herbs and spices can be as flavorful as salt.

To bring out the flavor in your foods without adding salt, try the following herbs and spices.

Û For beef: Use sage, garlic, thyme, pepper, or turmeric. Û For chicken: Use paprika, rosemary, curry, or garlic or

onion powder. Û For pork: Use thyme, basil, sage, pepper, curry, or garlic

or onion powder. Û For fish: Use lemon or lime juice, dill, or garlic or onion

powder. Û Try Mrs. Dash® or make your own herb and spice

mixture. Keep it in a shaker and use when cooking or at the table.

Û Be careful! Some seasonings and sauces have lots of salt: garlic and onion salts, poultry seasoning, soy sauce, barbecue sauce, ketchup, some hot sauces, and spaghetti and tomato sauces.

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61© 2017 UNC-CH Center for Health Promotion and Disease Prevention Drinks, Desserts, Snacks, Eating Out, & Salt

Tips

Drinks, Desserts, Snacks, Eating Out, and Salt

1. Choose healthy drinks.✻ Aim to replace sugar-sweetened drinks with healthy drinks

like water, lightly sweetened tea or coffee, milk, or smallportions of 100% fruit juice.

✻ It is also best to limit diet sodas and other drinks that useartificial sweeteners.

✻ Good choices are unsweetened or lightly sweetened icedtea, hot tea, or coffee. If you need to sweeten your tea orcoffee, 1 to 2 teaspoons per cup or glass is okay. It is fineto use 1 to 2 tablespoons of milk or half and half in tea orcoffee. Most experts think it is better to use half and half ormilk in coffee rather than sugar.

✻ Other good choices are:• Seltzer water with a splash of lemon, lime, or fruit juice.• 100% fruit juice, but aim for 1/2 cup or less per day.• Plain milk.

2. Watch out for sweets. Choose otherfoods for snacks or desserts.✻ Fill up on healthy foods so you are not as

hungry for sweets.✻ Try fruit for dessert.✻ Save sweets for special occasions

(birthdays and holidays), not every day.✻ When you do eat sweets, eat small

amounts.✻ Stay away from store-bought doughnuts,

sweet rolls, pies, cakes, cookies, candy bars (except dark chocolate), caramel candies, andcream-filled desserts. These foods are very high in sugar.

✻ A small amount of dark chocolate (dark chocolate should have more than 50% cocoasolids) is a good choice for dessert. Dark chocolate in small amounts (half to one ounceper serving) is thought to be good for your heart. The higher the cocoa solid content, theless sugar. For those with diabetes, 70% cocoa solids or higher is best.

Check the goals you want to work on for the next contact.✔

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62 Drinks, Desserts, Snacks, Eating Out, & Salt © 2017 UNC-CH Center for Health Promotion and Disease Prevention

Tips

Drinks, Desserts, Snacks, Eating Out,

and Salt

3. Choose cold and frozen desserts with care. Aim to eat 2 or fewerservings of frozen dessert each week.✻ For a refreshing summer dessert, have a chilled slice of watermelon or a bowl of fresh

berries with regular vanilla yogurt.✻ Try popsicles as a tasty treat. Be sure store-bought popsicles are made with 100% fruit

juice, or make your own. Freeze 100% fruit juice in small cups with popsicle sticks.✻ If you want a frozen dessert, eat a small amount (about half a cup) of ice cream or frozen

yogurt.

4. Be careful with snack chips and crackers.✻ Choose lightly salted chips and crackers made with vegetable oil.✻ When possible, choose whole grain crackers.✻ Instead of snack chips or crackers, try raw vegetables, fruit, or a small handful of nuts.

These are healthier options.✻ Try making popcorn at home.

5. Make good choices when you eat at restaurants.✻ When you eat out, choose what you eat carefully.✻ Choose healthy menu items such as:

• For breakfast, try eggs on a whole wheat muffin or with whole wheat toast.• Enjoy a burger

or sandwich asyour meal, ona whole wheatbun or bread,if available.

• Pizza withveggies is areasonablechoice.

Continued ➔

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63© 2017 UNC-CH Center for Health Promotion and Disease Prevention Drinks, Desserts, Snacks, Eating Out, & Salt

Tips

Drinks, Desserts, Snacks, Eating Out, and Salt

• Most entrees at sit down restaurantsare fine.

• Consider a side other than friesor potatoes, such as salad, fruit, orvegetables. Consider a large salad foryour meal.

• Full fat salad dressings and spreads aremade from healthy vegetable oil—usethese instead of the low-fat or no-fatoptions.

✻ Instead of eating out, prepare food at homebecause you know what ingredients areused. This is especially true for fried foodsbecause sometimes it is not easy to find outif restaurants use healthy oils.

✻ Avoid drinks with lots of sugar. Inrestaurants that have unsweetened andsweetened tea, ask for a mixture (half unsweetened and half sweetened).

✻ As portions sizes are often large, split an order with a friend, or eat half of the portionand take the rest home for another meal.

✻ Order small portion sizes.

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64 Drinks, Desserts, Snacks, Eating Out, & Salt © 2017 UNC-CH Center for Health Promotion and Disease Prevention

My Goals and First Steps

Drinks, Desserts, Snacks, Eating Out,

and Salt

My Goals and First StepsTo make changes, it is important to make goals and keep track of your progress. Enter the 2 goals you selected to work on today. Then enter your “First Steps” for achieving these goals. First Steps should be specific and realistic to get you started.

To plan First Steps, think about:

 When you will start working towards this goal.

 What you need to get started.

 If you can actually reach the goal.

Finally, keep track of your progress using the tables provided.

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65© 2017 UNC-CH Center for Health Promotion and Disease Prevention Drinks, Desserts, Snacks, Eating Out, & Salt

My Goals and First Steps

Drinks, Desserts, Snacks, Eating Out, and Salt

Date: ______________________

Goal 1: _______________________________

______________________________________

______________________________________

First Steps: ___________________________

______________________________________

______________________________________

Goal 2: _______________________________

______________________________________

______________________________________

First Steps: ___________________________

______________________________________

______________________________________

Place this sheet where you will see it often (refrigerator or bathroom mirror). You may monitor goals by the week (left side of table) or by the day (right side of table).

GOAL 1: Did you meet your goal? (Check for Yes, or for No)

Week Weekly Goal

Daily Goal

Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday

1 2 3 4 5

GOAL 2: Did you meet your goal? (Check for Yes, or for No)

Week Weekly Goal

Daily Goal

Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday

1 2 3 4 5

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