DOCUMENT RESUME UD 024 258 Constantino, Giuseppe; And Cuento Therapy. Folktales as a Culturally Sensitive

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  • ED 257 902

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    DOCUMENT RESUME

    UD 024 258

    Constantino, Giuseppe; And Others Cuento Therapy. Folktales as a Culturally Sensitive Psychotherapy for Puerto Rican Children. Monograph, No. 12. Fordham Univ., Bronx, N.Y. Hispanic Research Center. National Inst. of Mental Health (DHHS), Rockville, MD. Center for Minority Group Mental Health Program. ISBN-0-943862-23-X 85 NIMH-2P01MH-30569-06-Al 99p.; For a related document, see UD 024 259. Fordham University, Hispanic Research Center, Bronx, New York 10458 ($9.95 including postage). Books (010) Reports Descriptive (141) Reports - Research/Technical (143)

    EDR$' PRICE MF01/PC04 Plus Postage. DESCRIPTORS *Child Psychology; Clinical Psychology; Emotional

    Disturbances; Folk Culture; Hispanic Americans; Parent Role; *Psychotherapy; *Puerto Rican Culture; Puerto Ricans; *Story Telling

    IDENTIFIERS *Folktales

    ABSTRACT A seven-year project developing and testing cuento

    therapy, a form of child psychotherapy in which Puerto Rican mothers recount to their children folktales taken from Puerto Rican culture, is described and evaluated in this monograph. Chapter 1 explains how

    1 the research presented in later chapters,fits into substantially broader patterns of research foCusing on the treatment of the psychological problems of Hispanic populations living in the United States. Chapter 2 presentq,an interdisciplinary discussion of

    'traditional folk-healing pi.actices in Puerto Rico, the function of folktalds throughout history, the use of storytelling in psychotherapy, the theoretical framework of cuentro thekapy, and the mother's role in the therapy. Chapter 3 presents the methodological procedures used in conducting cuento therapy and in evaluating treatment outcomes. Chapter 4 provides results of an analysis of treatment effects on trait anxiety, cognition role-playing observations; and personality profiles. Finally, Chapter 5 presents a general overview of the clinical utility of cuento therapy. The major finding was that cuento therapy was effective in reducing trait anxiety. It also improved cocjnitive skills relating to social judgment and had some effect do aggressive behavior,as observed in role-playing situations. Its effect upon children's personality development was unclear, but its sensitivity to the clients', not the therapists', cultural background should be useful to.community mental health centers serving Puerto Rican clients. (KH)

  • HISPANIC RESEARCH CENTER.

    FORDHAM UNIVERSITY tst

    (Ni CUENTO THERAPY CD Cr%

    FOLKTALES AS, A CULTURALLY SENSITIVE um PSYCHOTHERAPY FOR PUERTO RICAN CHILDREN (NJ C:1 Lid "PERMISSION TO REPRODUCE THIS

    MATERIAL HAS BEEN GRANTED BY

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    fOrdit rt. ( (..{ LC iijimmtc, /6.,C1-eo, rt.,r2 t TO THE EDUCATIONAL RESOURCES INFORMATION CENTER (ERIC)"

    U S DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION NATIONAL INSTII UTE OF EDUCATION

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    Giuseppe Costantino Robert G. Malgady Lloyd H. Rogler

    Monograph No. 12

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    CUENTO THERAPY FOLKTALES AS A CULTURALLY,SENSITIVE

    PSYCHOTHERAPY FOR PUERTO RICAN CHILDREN

    4

    - Giuseppe Costantino Robert G. Mallixdly

    Lloyd H. Rogler

    }ARC Monograph No. 12 WATERFRONT PRESS MAPLEWOOD, N.J.

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    Copyright 1985 Hi,spanic Research Center

    This edition published by:

    Waterfront Press 52 Maple Ave. Maplewood, N.J. 07040

    ISBN; 6-943862-23-X

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  • HISPANIC RESEARCH CENTER FORDHAM UNIVERSITY

    BRONX, NEW YORK 10458

    MONOGRAPH SERIES _

    1 Monograph #1 jPue?to Ricgns and Health: Findings from New York City, by Jose Oscar

    Alers (1978).

    Monograph #2 Hispanic Intermarriage in New York City, by JosephT.' Frttpatrick,aml Douglas T. Gurak (1979).

    Monograph #3 The Hispanic Experience, of Criminal Justice, by Peter L. Sissons (1979).

    Monograph #4 ' The Puerto Rican Child in New York City4Stress and Mental Health, by Ian A. Canino, Brian F. fierley,and Lloyd H. Rogler (1980).

    Monograph #5 Adaptation and Adjustnrient ofCubans: West Nei York, New Jeirsey, 61, Eleanor Meyer Rogg and Rosemary Santana Cooney (1980).

    Mond.graph #6. Unitas: Hispanic and Black Children in a HeaLng Corpmunity, by Annti Farber and Lloyd H, Rogler (1981). 0

    Monograph #7 Work, Family and H ealth: Latina Wown in Transition, edited by Ruth E. Zambrrna (1982).

    of

    'Monograph #8 Unitas: A .mining Manual for. Building healing Communiti8 for Children, by Edward P. Eismann (1982).

    Monograph #9 The Minority Foster Child: A Comparatie Study of Hispanic, Black and White Children, by Douglas T. Gurak, David Arrender Smith and MaryF. Goldson (1982).

    Monograph #10 A Conceptual FrameWork fir Mental Health Research on Hispanic Popvlations, by Lloyd H. Rogler et al. (1983).

    Monograph #11 Puerto, Rican Families in New-York City: Intergetmational Processes, lw I loyd H. Rogler and. Rosemary. Santana Cdoney(1984).

    Monograph #12 Cuento Therapy: Folktales as a Culturally Sensitive Psychotherapy for Puerto Rican Children, Giuseppe 'COstantino, Robert G. Malgady, and Lloyd H. Rogler (I 985).

    I tic Ifisilaw( fkrrarth Center t% rd by limrart Gant 2P01 Mil 30569-06 AI Irmo the National 11:mititr of Mental Health,

    Center for Mworitv Group Mental Health Program.

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    CONTENTS

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    4. Preface viii

    Aacnowledgments xiii

    I Culturally Sensitive Therapy fin Hispanics 1

    Cultural Sensitivity as Increased Accessibility of -

    Treatment.' f 2

    ,ctilrural Stnsit'vitv as Selection or Modification of /-

    Treatipcnt 4

    Cultural Sensitivity as Utilization of a Cultural Element to

    2

    DeVteiO'a Treatmetu Modality r

    The Background of Cuento therilpy

    Folk H.ealjng Practices in Puerto Rico

    The Functions of Folktales w

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    .StOrytelling in Psychotherapy 17

    Theoretical Framey4,1;rk of Cuento Therapy. 20

    11w Mother's Role in Cuento Therapy 23

    SintiniaVy 25

    3 Research Methodology 31

    RegNarch Participants

    Original and Adapted Cuento Therapy 34

    Art/Plav -therapy 44

    Measurement Instruments 45

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    4. va tuition of herapeutic Outcomes. 53

    T-reatmeibt Effects on Trait Anxiety

    Treatment Effects on Cognition 57

    Treatment Effects on Role-Playing Observations 58 I to,

    Treatment Effects on TEMAS Profiles ,5.9

    5 Clinical iltility of Cycnto Therapy .73 bait Anxiety ' . , 74 Cognitive Functioning 77

    Aggressioii in Role-PlayingSituations 78

    Personality Profiles 79 °

    Culturally Sensitive Treatment Modalities = Revisited. . . 80

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    TABLES I

    , 0 3.1 Frequency Distribution of Research -Participants' ,

    Personal and Family Background. Variables (N = 210) 33

    3*.2 Descriptive Statistics of Research Participants' Personal and Family Background Variables (N .=-rE10) 34

    4.1 01;4;111 Means and Standard Deviations on Trait Aniety Scale at.Prete5s, Immedidte Posttest (N = 210) and One-Year Follow -up Posttest (N :4 178), 54

    4.2 Overall Means and Standard Deviations of WISC Subtests at the Pretest and Immediate Posttest Evaluations (N = 210) . 56

    4.3 Overall Means and Standard Deviations of Role-Playing Observations at Pretest, ImmedGe Posttest (N = 210) and. One -Year Follow-up Posttest (N = 178) ,,60

    4.4 Overall Means and Standard Deviations on TEMAS Personality ,Variables at the Pretest, Immediate Posttest (N = 210) and One-Year Follow-up Posttest (N = 178) 602.

    4.5 Summary of Therapkiti Outcomes of Original and Adapted Cuento Treatments 70

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    FIGURES

    , 4.1 First-graders' MeaN Trait Anxiety Scores 55

    4.2 Meattfo llow-Up Trait Anxiety Scores o 36

    4.3 Mean WISC Comprehension Spores 58

    4.4 Meant Observations of Aggression 61 .

    4 .5 Mean Posttest Aggression Scenes 63

    4.6. Mean. Posttest Anxiety Scores' 64

    4.7 Mew- Posttest Sexual Identity Scores 65

    4.8 -Mean Follow -Up Reality Testing Scores 66

    4.9 Boys' Mean Follow-Up Self-Concept of Competence Scores. . . 67

    4.10 Girls' Mean Follow-Up Self-C9ncePt of Competence Scores. . 69

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    PREFACE

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    About a year after we estabiished. Fordham University's Hispanic Research Center in 197.7, Dr. Giuseppe Costantino visited us to discuss research he wanted to undertake. A. clinical psychologist working in a community mental health center in one of New York City's boroughs, Dr. Costantino long had noted ttlat many of the emotionally troubled Puerto Rican children who came to the mental health center had problems which were rooted in 'their bicultutal.experience. Their complaints ex