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197 from the longitudinal current from these nerve fibers. The amplitude of recorded impulses were approximately proportional to the resistance of the pulp and neither the depth or cross-sectional area of the cavity, nor the pulp exposure influenced the amplitude of the spikes. Spike amplitude also was dependent on the intercavity distance. The results also showed that it is not possible to record discharges in the finest terminal branches at the pu!po- dentinal border, but that these terminals are activated du~ng stimulation, resulting in propagated action potentials, In summary, these findings indicate that tooth pulp-recorded potentials do not arise from dentin and that recep- Lot potentials cannot be recorded with present techniques. MEDICINE Diurnal ,,ariation and individual differences in the perception of Latractab!e pain. -- S. Folkard, C.J. Glynn ann J.W. L!oyd, J. psych~som~ P,~es., 20 (1976) 289--301 A diurnal variation in reported pain intensity wa~ observed in a group of 41 patients with in,actable pain who rated the intensity of pain on a visum analogue ~ca!e at 2-h intervals, from 08.00 to 22.00, for 7 successive days. Differences in this diurnal variations appeared depending on sex and person- ality of the patients. Differences were also present between patients who wen~ out to work during the day and the others. The implications of these data for relief of pain are discu--~cl. Chest pain as a predictor of coronary artery disease in patients with obstru,;- tire aortic valve disease. -- P.A. Paquay, G. Anderson, H. Diefenthal, L. Nordstrom, H.G. Richman and F.L. Gobel, Amer. J. Cardiol. 38 (19 e6~ 863--869 In a group of 76 patients wEo had aortic valve disease coronary ar~rio- graphy was performed in order to clarify the association between chest pare and significant coronary ar*~ery disease. The presence of chest pain correlated wed with the uresence of ~gnificant coronary artery disease. Whether the pain was ~,ypical or a~ypical of angina pectoris was not predictive of the presence or absence of coronary artery dis- ease, but the more typical the chest pain was of angina pecto::ds, the more likely were patients to have significant coronary artery disease. Les formes graves des ~pigastmlgies dites fonctionnelles (The severe forms of so-called functional epigastric pain). -- J. Rog6 and M. Bossot, Sere. HS>. Paris, 52 (1976) 731--738 Seventeen severe cases of functional epigastric pain resistant ~o usual symptomatic treatment are reported. Two special characte~stics were pres- ent in all patients: pain was constant in time; palpation oz' the region around the aorta provoked pain. A psychological study showed an unusual form of neurotic decompensatJon occurring under special circumstances. The

Diurnal variation and individual differences in the perception of intractable pain

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from the longitudinal current from these nerve fibers. The amplitude of recorded impulses were approximately proportional to the resistance of the pulp and neither the depth or cross-sectional area of the cavity, nor the pulp exposure influenced the amplitude of the spikes. Spike amplitude also was dependent on the intercavity distance. The results also showed that it is not possible to record discharges in the finest terminal branches at the pu!po- dentinal border, but that these terminals are activated du~ng stimulation, resulting in propagated action potentials, In summary, these findings indicate that tooth pulp-recorded potentials do not arise from dentin and that recep- Lot potentials cannot be recorded with present techniques.

MEDICINE

Diurnal ,,ariation and individual differences in the perception of Latractab!e pain. -- S. Folkard, C.J. Glynn ann J.W. L!oyd, J. psych~som~ P,~es., 20 (1976) 289--301

A diurnal variation in reported pain intensity wa~ observed in a group of 41 patients with in,actable pain who rated the intensity of pain on a visum analogue ~ca!e at 2-h intervals, from 08.00 to 22.00, for 7 successive days. Differences in this diurnal variations appeared depending on sex and person- ality of the patients. Differences were also present between patients who wen~ out to work during the day and the others. The implications of these data for relief of pain are discu--~cl.

Chest pain as a predictor of coronary artery disease in patients with obstru,;- tire aortic valve disease. -- P.A. Paquay, G. Anderson, H. Diefenthal, L. Nordstrom, H.G. Richman and F.L. Gobel, Amer. J. Cardiol. 38 (19 e6~ 863--869

In a group of 76 patients wEo had aortic valve disease coronary ar~rio- graphy was performed in order to clarify the association between chest pare and significant coronary ar*~ery disease.

The presence of chest pain correlated wed with the uresence of ~gnificant coronary artery disease. Whether the pain was ~,ypical or a~ypical of angina pectoris was not predictive of the presence or absence of coronary artery dis- ease, but the more typical the chest pain was of angina pecto::ds, the more likely were patients to have significant coronary artery disease.

Les formes graves des ~pigastmlgies dites fonctionnelles (The severe forms of so-called functional epigastric pain). -- J. Rog6 and M. Bossot, Sere. HS>. Paris, 52 (1976) 731--738

Seventeen severe cases of functional epigastric pain resistant ~o usual symptomatic treatment are reported. Two special characte~stics were pres- ent in all patients: pain was constant in time; palpation oz' the region around the aorta provoked pain. A psychological study showed an unusual form of neurotic decompensatJon occurring under special circumstances. The