Digital Photography I & II Your guide to understanding photography in a digital world

  • Published on
    19-Jan-2018

  • View
    212

  • Download
    0

Embed Size (px)

DESCRIPTION

Digital photography is a form of photography that uses digital technology to make images of subjects. Until the advent of such technology, photography used photographic film to create images made visible by photographic processing.photographydigitalimagesphotographic filmphotographic processing By contrast, digital photographs can be displayed, printed, stored, manipulated, transmitted, and archived using digital and computer techniques, without chemical processing.digital photographs computer

Transcript

Digital Photography I & II

Your guide to understanding photography in a digital world

What is Digital Photography?

What is Digital Photography?

Digital photography is a form of photography that uses digital technology to make images of subjects. Until the advent of such technology, photography used photographic film to create images made visible by photographic processing. By contrast, digital photographs can be displayed, printed, stored, manipulated, transmitted, and archived using digital and computer techniques, without chemical processing.

History of Cameras

Pinhole Camera

470 AD to 390 AD??!

35 mm Camera

1913-Present

Digital Camera

1970-Present

Exit ticket

What did the mirror do to help the pinhole camera?

Pinhole Cameras

A pinhole camera is a very simple camera with no lens and a single very small aperture. Simply explained, it is a light-proof box with a small hole in one side. Light from a scene passes through this single point and projects an inverted image on the opposite side of the box

Back to History of Cameras

Pinhole Technology

Back to History of Cameras

Pinhole Diagram

Back to History of Cameras

Pin Hole Images

Back to History of Cameras

Back to History of Cameras

Back to History of Cameras

Back to History of Cameras

Back to History of Cameras

35 mm Film

The term 135 (ISO 1007) was introduced by Kodak in 1934[1] as a designation for film 35mm (1.4 in) wide, specifically for still photography. Earliest 35 mm still camerasThe 35 mm film standard for motion picture film was established in Thomas Edison's lab by William Kennedy Laurie Dickson. Mr. Dickson took 70 mm film stock supplied by George Eastman's Eastman Kodak Company. The 70 mm film was cut lengthwise into two equal width (35 mm) strips, spliced together end to end, and then perforated along both edges. The original picture size was 18 x 24 mm, which in modern times is considered to be a "half-frame" format for still photography. There were four perforations on each side of a motion picture frame.

Back to History of Cameras

35 mm Camera

Oskar Barnack, who was in charge of research and development at Leitz, decided to investigate using 35mm cine film for still cameras while attempting to build a compact camera capable of making high-quality enlargements.

This changed in 1936 with the introduction of the inexpensive Argus A and to an even greater extent in 1939 with the arrival of the immensely popular Argus C3. Although the cheapest cameras still used rollfilm, 35mm film had come to dominate the market by the time the C3 was discontinued in 1966.

Back to History of Cameras

Digital Cameras

Digital cameras differ from their analog predecessors primarily in that they do not use film, but capture and save photographs on digital memory cards or internal storage instead. Their low operating costs have negatively impacted film/chemical cameras. Digital cameras now include wireless communication capabilities (for example Wi-Fi or Bluetooth) to transfer, print or share photos, and are commonly found on mobile phones.

Back to History of Cameras

Recommended

View more >