1
1076 but only those boys will be allowed to leave who are in indubit- ably good and robust health. The remainder will, of course, stay on the premises, concerning whose sanitary condition Dr. Sedgwick Saunders has been obliged to express himself so strongly. This is unfortunately a necessary precaution against a wide spread of the disease from the school as a focus, but it is to be hoped that the period of probation will be made as brief for these lads as is compatible with its object. - DEATH AT HOCKEY. WHAT is believed to be the first fatal accident at hockey occurred on Saturday last during the progress of a match between two suburban teams. The cause of death appears to have been a violent blow over the heart from a ball struck with great violence at a very short range. No one can accuse us in these pages of taking up an unduly soft or effeminate attitude towards athletics-their dangers and their com. pensating advantages-and for that very reason we always deeply regret to hear of these untoward circumstances. They confirm the timid view, which we believe to be in general the wrong view. Many an eye has been lost at rackets, and cricket can claim its share of nasty injuries to its votaries. But the total roll of disaster from these sports is very short when we consider the enormous numbers of the players. With football we think the position is a little different. The number of injuries is out of proportion to the number of persons who play, and their severity has been attested by the not infre- quent loss of life. We do not suppose that hockey, hitherto considered the safest of pastimes and daily becoming more popular, will be classed at once as a dangerous game because of this melancholy occurrence; but as this is possible one question occurs to us, Is it too late to alter the rules ? The rules of football have been modified more than once-and we are happy to say with practical success-to obviate danger, and the resulting game is no worse for its comparative humanity. Would it altogether spoil hockey to play it-as it used to be played-with a lighter ball As long as an ordinary cricket-ball is employed the risk of a repetition of Saturday’s tragedy remains. - TREATMENT OF CHOREA. IN a paper recently read by Dr. Eskridge before the Colorado State Medical Society, and more lately published in the Plailadelphia Medical News, particular reference was made to the treatment of chorea on a plan which he states to be most successful. In all except the very mildest cases ’, absolute rest in bed night and day is insisted upon. The I patient is ordered as many grains of antipyrine as he numbers years three times daily after food, the dose being increased by one grain each day until all movements have ceased. Fowler’s solution is then given in doses of one minim well diluted in water after each meal, the dose here also being daily increased by one minim until the point of tolerance is reached. About the second or third day after the arsenical treatment has been added the antipyrine is given only once in each twenty-four hours, usually between 8 P. M. and 9 P.M. After all but the most occasional twitching has stopped the antipyrine is discontinued, and iodide of iron is given with arsenic. It is also recommended that the arsenic should be continued a month after all choreic symptoms have ceased. A nutritious, digestible, and non- stimulating diet is recommended, and it is claimed that this treatment, heroic as it may seem, is unattended with danger unless the temperature is raised or cardiac weakness be present. Valvular disease is said to be not necessarily a contraindication to the free administration of antipyrine, but cardiac dilatation is prohibitive of its use. Dr. Eskridge gives details of a few cases treated on his plan, and these so far seem to bear out his statements ; but chorea is a pecu- liarly variable disease in its reactions to drugs. It would be interesting to know whether this method of treatment has failed in an ordinarily severe case. PROFESSOR HAMILTON ON THE PROGRESS OF PATHOLOGY. ONE of the most interesting of the introductory lectures given at the opening of this session was that which Professor D. J. Hamilton delivered to his class of pathology at Aber- deen University. In it he reviewed some of the recent acquisitions to knowledge in this department of medical science and pointed out with some truth how the pendulum of pathological thought was swinging back in the direction of 11 humoralism, "but with a wider insight into the scope and meaning of that doctrine. He commenced by referring to the thyroid gland and the treatment of myxcedema which has resulted from pathological research into the nature and affinities of that remarkable affection. Next he took up the subject of pancreatic diabetes which arose in the discovery that excision of the pancreas made animals diabetic. Still,’he said, it must not be supposed that glycosuria and diabetes are not also produced by other factors than those in which this gland is supposed to share. The bulk of his lecture was, however, occupied with the question of immunity from disease-the subject which is perhaps, more than any other, engaging the attention of experimental pathologists to-day. The new discoveries in the direction of "serum therapeutics," and, in particular, the work that has been done upon the toxine and anti-toxine of tetanus, were shown to be promising of good results, not merely in the treatment of that grave malady, but in that of others which are caused by analogous agencies. FOREIGN UNIVERSITY INTELLIGENCE. &Aring;1/isterda-m.-Dr. Graanboom has been recognised as vrircct-docent in Children’s Diseases. Bonn -Professor Karl Finkelnburg has obtained leave of prolonged absence on account of his health. Oracorv.-Dr. T. Skroczynski has been recognised asprivat- docent in Ophthalmology. Kazan.-Dr. O. A. Rustitski of Kieff has been appointed Extraordinary Professor of Surgery. .<M’f.&mdash;Dr. LeonhardHirschmann, Professor of Ophthal- mology, has become Emeritus Professor. Dr. Open Khovski, Extraordinary Professor, has been appointed to the Professor- ship of Clinical Therapeutics. Dr. N. Kulchitski has been promoted to the Chair of Histology and Embryology. Kieff.-Dr. L. Malinovski of Kazan has been appointed to the Chair of Clinical Surgery. Naples.-Dr. E. De Renzi has been appointed to succeed the late Professor Cantani as Director of the First Medical Clinic, and Dr. Antonio Cardarelli has been appointed to succeed Dr. De Renzi in the chair of Medical Pathology. St. Petersbzc.rg (MilitaryMedicalAcademy ).-Dr. F. Paster- natski has been promoted to be Ordinary Professor of Clinical Therapeutics. - DEATHS OF EMINENT FOREIGN MEDICAL MEN. THE deaths of the following distinguished members of the medical profession abroad have been announced :-Dr. Etienne Michele van Kempen, one of the oldest of Belgian physiologists, his researches dating from before 1812. Among the most important of his published papers may be mentioned ,’Exp6riences Physiologiques sur la Transmission de la Sensibilite et du Mouvement dans la Mo&euml;l1e Spinale " (1858) and I Nouvelles Recherches sur la Nature Fonctionnelle des Racines du Nerf Pneumogastrique et du Nerf Spinal" (1862).- Dr. L6on Lefort, Professor of Clinical Surgery in Paris.-Dr. W. B. Towles, formerly Professor of Anatomy at the Univer-

DEATH AT HOCKEY

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but only those boys will be allowed to leave who are in indubit-ably good and robust health. The remainder will, of course,stay on the premises, concerning whose sanitary conditionDr. Sedgwick Saunders has been obliged to express himselfso strongly. This is unfortunately a necessary precautionagainst a wide spread of the disease from the school as afocus, but it is to be hoped that the period of probation willbe made as brief for these lads as is compatible with itsobject. -

DEATH AT HOCKEY.

WHAT is believed to be the first fatal accident at hockeyoccurred on Saturday last during the progress of a matchbetween two suburban teams. The cause of death appears tohave been a violent blow over the heart from a ball struckwith great violence at a very short range. No one can accuseus in these pages of taking up an unduly soft or effeminateattitude towards athletics-their dangers and their com.

pensating advantages-and for that very reason we alwaysdeeply regret to hear of these untoward circumstances. Theyconfirm the timid view, which we believe to be in general thewrong view. Many an eye has been lost at rackets, andcricket can claim its share of nasty injuries to its votaries.But the total roll of disaster from these sports is very shortwhen we consider the enormous numbers of the players. Withfootball we think the position is a little different. The numberof injuries is out of proportion to the number of persons whoplay, and their severity has been attested by the not infre-quent loss of life. We do not suppose that hockey, hithertoconsidered the safest of pastimes and daily becoming morepopular, will be classed at once as a dangerous game becauseof this melancholy occurrence; but as this is possible onequestion occurs to us, Is it too late to alter the rules ? Therules of football have been modified more than once-and weare happy to say with practical success-to obviate danger,and the resulting game is no worse for its comparativehumanity. Would it altogether spoil hockey to play it-as itused to be played-with a lighter ball As long as an ordinarycricket-ball is employed the risk of a repetition of Saturday’stragedy remains. -

TREATMENT OF CHOREA.

IN a paper recently read by Dr. Eskridge before theColorado State Medical Society, and more lately published inthe Plailadelphia Medical News, particular reference was madeto the treatment of chorea on a plan which he states to

be most successful. In all except the very mildest cases ’,absolute rest in bed night and day is insisted upon. The I

patient is ordered as many grains of antipyrine as he numbersyears three times daily after food, the dose being increasedby one grain each day until all movements have ceased.Fowler’s solution is then given in doses of one minim welldiluted in water after each meal, the dose here also beingdaily increased by one minim until the point of tolerance isreached. About the second or third day after the arsenicaltreatment has been added the antipyrine is given onlyonce in each twenty-four hours, usually between 8 P. M.and 9 P.M. After all but the most occasional twitchinghas stopped the antipyrine is discontinued, and iodide ofiron is given with arsenic. It is also recommended thatthe arsenic should be continued a month after all choreic

symptoms have ceased. A nutritious, digestible, and non-stimulating diet is recommended, and it is claimed that this

treatment, heroic as it may seem, is unattended with dangerunless the temperature is raised or cardiac weakness be

present. Valvular disease is said to be not necessarily acontraindication to the free administration of antipyrine,but cardiac dilatation is prohibitive of its use. Dr. Eskridgegives details of a few cases treated on his plan, and these sofar seem to bear out his statements ; but chorea is a pecu-

liarly variable disease in its reactions to drugs. It would be

interesting to know whether this method of treatment hasfailed in an ordinarily severe case.

PROFESSOR HAMILTON ON THE PROGRESS OFPATHOLOGY.

ONE of the most interesting of the introductory lecturesgiven at the opening of this session was that which ProfessorD. J. Hamilton delivered to his class of pathology at Aber-deen University. In it he reviewed some of the recent

acquisitions to knowledge in this department of medicalscience and pointed out with some truth how the pendulumof pathological thought was swinging back in the directionof 11 humoralism, "but with a wider insight into the scopeand meaning of that doctrine. He commenced by referringto the thyroid gland and the treatment of myxcedema whichhas resulted from pathological research into the natureand affinities of that remarkable affection. Next he took

up the subject of pancreatic diabetes which arose inthe discovery that excision of the pancreas made animalsdiabetic. Still,’he said, it must not be supposed that

glycosuria and diabetes are not also produced by otherfactors than those in which this gland is supposed to share.The bulk of his lecture was, however, occupied with thequestion of immunity from disease-the subject whichis perhaps, more than any other, engaging the attention ofexperimental pathologists to-day. The new discoveries inthe direction of "serum therapeutics," and, in particular,the work that has been done upon the toxine and anti-toxineof tetanus, were shown to be promising of good results,not merely in the treatment of that grave malady, but inthat of others which are caused by analogous agencies.

FOREIGN UNIVERSITY INTELLIGENCE.

&Aring;1/isterda-m.-Dr. Graanboom has been recognised as

vrircct-docent in Children’s Diseases.Bonn -Professor Karl Finkelnburg has obtained leave of

prolonged absence on account of his health.Oracorv.-Dr. T. Skroczynski has been recognised asprivat-

docent in Ophthalmology.Kazan.-Dr. O. A. Rustitski of Kieff has been appointed

Extraordinary Professor of Surgery..<M’f.&mdash;Dr. LeonhardHirschmann, Professor of Ophthal-

mology, has become Emeritus Professor. Dr. Open Khovski,Extraordinary Professor, has been appointed to the Professor-ship of Clinical Therapeutics. Dr. N. Kulchitski has been

promoted to the Chair of Histology and Embryology.Kieff.-Dr. L. Malinovski of Kazan has been appointed to

the Chair of Clinical Surgery.Naples.-Dr. E. De Renzi has been appointed to succeed

the late Professor Cantani as Director of the First Medical

Clinic, and Dr. Antonio Cardarelli has been appointed to

succeed Dr. De Renzi in the chair of Medical Pathology.St. Petersbzc.rg (MilitaryMedicalAcademy ).-Dr. F. Paster-

natski has been promoted to be Ordinary Professor of ClinicalTherapeutics.

-

DEATHS OF EMINENT FOREIGN MEDICAL MEN.

THE deaths of the following distinguished members of

the medical profession abroad have been announced :-Dr.Etienne Michele van Kempen, one of the oldest of Belgian

physiologists, his researches dating from before 1812. Amongthe most important of his published papers may be mentioned,’Exp6riences Physiologiques sur la Transmission de la

Sensibilite et du Mouvement dans la Mo&euml;l1e Spinale " (1858)and I Nouvelles Recherches sur la Nature Fonctionnelle des

Racines du Nerf Pneumogastrique et du Nerf Spinal" (1862).-Dr. L6on Lefort, Professor of Clinical Surgery in Paris.-Dr.W. B. Towles, formerly Professor of Anatomy at the Univer-