Curriculum Guide - D155ww3.d155.org/cls/studentservices/Documents/CopyofCourseSelection...Curriculum Guide 2016-2017 Cary-Grove High School Crystal Lake Central High School Crystal Lake South High School Prairie Ridge High School

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_________________ Curriculum Guide 2016-2017 Cary-Grove High School Crystal Lake Central High School Crystal Lake South High School Prairie Ridge High School Haber Oaks Campus Community High School District 155 Mission Statement For each student, we will inspire a love for learning, empower the pursuit of personal aspirations, and nurture a desire to contribute to the world. back to index 1 _______________________ Index Graduation Requirements.. General Scheduling, Course and Grading Information.. High School Course Requirements for Illinois Public Universities.. Humanities Art. English. Music Industry and Careers... Business Education Child Development and the Family..... Culinary Arts Education for Employment Fashion and Design... Industrial Technology.... International Studies Social Science........ World Language. Non-Departmental Courses... back to index 2 STEM. Mathematics Science.... Wellness Driver Education. Health Education... Physical Education.... back to index 3 _______________________ GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS RECOMMENDED COURSE SELECTIONS FOR COLLEGE ENTRANCE Colleges, universities, and other post secondary institutions require students to have successfully completed certain coursework in high school. However, not all post secondary institutions have the same entrance requirements and some may exceed Community High School District 155s minimum graduation requirements. The resource titled, State Universities in Illinois At a Glance provides a comprehensive summary of minimum high school course requirements for admission of freshman to Illinois public universities. Another useful resource titled, the Career Pathway Plan of Study is available through the McHenry County Regional Office of Education. Students are always encouraged to research entrance requirements thoroughly. Additional support is available through the Student Services Department at your local high school. back to index 4 https://www.iacac.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/09/State-Universities-in-Illinois-At-a-Glance-2015-2016.pdfhttps://www.iacac.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/09/State-Universities-in-Illinois-At-a-Glance-2015-2016.pdfhttps://www.co.mchenry.il.us/county-government/regional-office-of-education/college-and-career-readinessStudent Service Coordinator School E-mail Telephone Dr. Hank Harvey Cary-Grove hharvey@d155.org (847) 639-3825 Mr. Steve Greiner Crystal Lake Central sgreiner@d155.org (815) 459-2505 Mr. Josh Nobilio Crystal Lake South jnobilio@d155.org (815) 455-3860 Mrs. Julia Nadler Prairie Ridge jnadler@d155.org (815) 479-0404 The following high school courses would meet the requirements of most colleges and universities: English 4 years Mathematics 3 years Science 3 years Social Science 3 years World Language/Fine Art 2 years CHSD 155 GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS Classroom Driver Education 1/4 credit Computer Education 1/2 credit Consumer Education 1/4 credit Elective Courses 6 credits One credit of the electives must be earned in Music, Art, World Language, or Vocational Education. English 4 credits Mathematics 3 credits One credit must be in Algebra I and one credit must be a course that includes geometry content. Physical Education & Health 2 1/4 credits back to index 5 Science 2 credits Social Science 2 credits At least one year must be United States History. Beginning with the High School Graduating Class of 2020, the ISBE mandated civics requirement must be met. More information regarding how this requirement may be met will be forthcoming. TOTAL FOR GRADUATION 20 1/4 CREDITS At least nine credits for graduation must be earned after the sophomore year. DAILY SCHEDULE The school day has nine-45 minute periods. Students have five minutes of passing time between classes. Classes meet five periods per week unless otherwise indicated in the course description. MINIMUM LOAD Students must enroll in a minimum of four academic subjects, plus physical education. Health will be taken in lieu of physical education one semester of the sophomore year. Music participation classes, consumer education, and the driver education classroom phase are taken in addition to this minimum load. SPECIAL CONSIDERATIONS In many instances, the availability of courses depends upon student demand. Normally a minimum of 15 students is required for a course to be taught; 12 students for an Advanced Placement course. If there is insufficient demand, the course will not be taught that semester or year, but it will remain in the curriculum for future consideration. Course offerings normally are consistent from year to year. There is the possibility, however, that courses may be added or dropped if students' needs call for such action. Course offerings may be subject to teacher availability, facilities at each building, and other related circumstances. Families are encouraged to communicate with their childs counselor regarding online course opportunities; specifically whether or not a college or university will accept credit earned through online coursework. For instance, the NCAA clearinghouse has historically denied credits earned through online programs such as PLATO. These back to index 6 decisions vary, so families are encouraged to research these matters and solicit the support of school personnel to ensure appropriate course(s) are selected. GRADING AND REPORTING The following common grading scale will be used throughout all courses. Letter Grade Hi Low A+ 100 97.50 A 97.49 92.50 A- 92.49 90.00 B+ 89.99 87.50 B 87.49 82.50 B- 82.49 80.00 C+ 79.99 77.50 C 77.49 72.50 C- 72.49 70.00 D+ 69.99 67.50 D 67.49 62.50 D- 62.49 60.00 F 59.99 00.00 Student grades are reported on a nine-week basis and by semesters. Semesters are made up of two nine-week periods plus a final exam. Throughout the school year, parents and students have online access to grades through Family Access in Skyward. The semester grade is determined by averaging the two nine-week grades and the final exam grade. Additional information regarding this process is available at http://ww3.d155.org/Pages/AcademicGrades.aspx. The official transcript is based on the final grade for the course each semester. back to index 7 http://ww3.d155.org/Pages/AcademicGrades.aspxhttp://ww3.d155.org/Pages/AcademicGrades.aspxThe district Response to Intervention (RtI) committee is in the process of piloting various grading practices based upon research. Grading practices may include, but are not limited to percentage grading, standards based grading, formative and summative assessments. The purpose of this initiative is to increase student achievement and update district-wide classroom grading parameters. Participating teachers will provide students with additional information related to these matters. Additional information is available at https://drive.google.com/file/d/0BzqwdkoUMYvld2NIb1FaWmpvVEk/view?usp=sharing The Graduating Class of 2014 and any graduating classes thereafter will be subject to a grade point average system that is separated into three categories: General (G), Honors (H), and Advanced Placement (AP). The final grade point average (GPA) is a cumulative average based upon 8 semesters of high school work. To determine GPA, use the following scale: General Honors Advanced Placement GPA GPA GPA A+ 4.33 A+ 4.83 A+ 5.33 A 4.00 A 4.50 A 5.00 A- 3.67 A- 4.17 A- 4.67 B+ 3.33 B+ 3.83 B+ 4.33 B 3.00 B 3.50 B 4.00 B- 2.67 B- 3.17 B- 3.67 C+ 2.33 C+ 2.83 C+ 3.33 C 2.00 C 2.50 C 3.00 C- 1.67 C- 2.17 C- 2.67 D+ 1.33 D+ 1.83 D+ 2.33 D 1.00 D 1.50 D 2.00 D- 0.67 D- 1.17 D- 1.67 back to index 8 https://drive.google.com/file/d/0BzqwdkoUMYvld2NIb1FaWmpvVEk/view?usp=sharingF 0.00 F 0.00 F 0.00 General (G) courses are for students who have attained fundamental school skills and who are working toward higher competencies. Students in the (G) level are expected to: 1. take responsibility for more independent learning as they progress toward their senior year with guided practice as a regular part of instruction. 2. review and study class material in addition to completing assigned homework. 3. strengthen and apply recall and comprehension skills as the foundation for learning higher-level thinking skills such as problem-solving, inference, synthesis, and evaluation. 4. in the event that research projects are assigned, be thorough in their research. The projects can take any of the following forms including written, spoken, performed, or crafted. 5. function at a pace that allows for frequent review and checks for understanding. Homework will typically be assigned a minimum of three times a week. It will require students to read, write, problem-solve, review, memorize, design or craft. Honors (H) courses are for students working at higher, challenging levels and demonstrating skills at an accelerated pace. Students in the (H) level are expected to: 1. take immediate responsibility for independent learning with guided practice when needed. 2. review and study class material consistently in addition to completing assigned homework. 3. use recall and comprehension skills. The Honors level emphasizes higher level thinking skills. Students work will demonstrate the use of higher learning skills such as problem-solving, inference, synthesis, and evaluation. The curriculum is more complex, challenging, and extensive than at the General level. 4. in the event that research projects are assigned, be self-directed and independent in their research. The projects can take any of the following forms including written, spoken, performed, or crafted. Students will be expected to complete these projects in addition to daily class work and homework. 5. adjust to an accelerated pace. Limited time is built into the curriculum for review. back to index 9 Homework will typically be assigned a minimum of four times a week. It will require students to read, write, problem-solve, review, memorize, design, or craft. Summer assignments may also be provided. Courses in this category are: Business: Virtual Enterprises International: Entrepreneurship (H) Business Incubator (H) English Freshman English 101-102 (H) Sophomore English 115-116 (H) Junior English 149-150 (H) Industrial Tech Introduction to Engineering (H) Principles of Engineering (H) Digital Electronics (H) Engineering Design and Development (H) Math Geometry (H) Algebra II with Trigonometry (H) Pre-Calculus (H) Science Biology (H) Chemistry (H) Survey of Human Anatomy and Physiology (H) Social Science World Studies I (H) World Studies II (H) Modern World History (H) World Language Chinese III (H) Chinese IV (H) French III (H) French IV (H) back to index 10 German III (H) German IV (H) Spanish III (H) Spanish IV (H) Advanced Placement (AP) courses are for students with exceptionally rapid learning abilities, advanced school skills, preparing for an Advanced Placement examination, and/or planning to attend a college/university after high school. Students in the AP level are expected to: 1. take full and immediate responsibility for independent learning with limited guided practice. 2. review and study class material extensively in addition to completing assigned homework. 3. have recall, comprehension, and problem-solving skills. The AP level emphasizes inference, synthesis, and evaluation. A difference between AP and Honors levels is the frequency and depth of activities reflecting these higher order skills. The curriculum is more complex, challenging, and extensive than at the Honors level. 4. in the event that research projects are assigned, be self-directed and independent in their research. The projects can take any of the following forms; written, spoken, performed, or crafted. Students will be expected to complete these projects in addition to daily class work and homework. 5. adjust to an accelerated pace that approximates college-level pacing. Homework will typically be assigned daily. It will be extensive, time-consuming, and require students to read, write, problem-solve, review, memorize, design, or craft. Summer assignments may also be provided. Courses in this category are: English AP Language & Composition AP Literature & Composition AP Research AP Seminar Fine Art AP Studio Art 2D AP Studio Art 3D AP Drawing back to index 11 AP Art History Industry and Careers AP Computer Science Principles Math AP Computer Science AP Calculus AB AP Calculus BC AP Statistics Music AP Music Theory Science AP Biology AP Chemistry AP Physics I AP Physics C AP Environmental Science Social Science AP U.S. History AP European History AP U.S. Government & Politics AP Psychology AP Micro Economics AP Macro Economics AP Human Geography World Language AP French Language & Culture AP German Language & Culture AP Spanish Language & Culture AP Spanish Literature & Culture Please visit https://apstudent.collegeboard.org/exploreap to learn more about Advanced Placement and to access student friendly resources. If you are interested in the Advanced Placement credit policy at a particular university, then please visit https://apstudent.collegeboard.org/creditandplacement/search-credit-policies back to index 12 https://apstudent.collegeboard.org/exploreaphttps://apstudent.collegeboard.org/exploreaphttps://apstudent.collegeboard.org/creditandplacement/search-credit-policieshttps://apstudent.collegeboard.org/creditandplacement/search-credit-policiesPASS/NO CREDIT GRADING OPTION The following parameters associated with the Pass/No Credit (P/NC) grading option are under review and subject to change. Updates will be reflected in this document as they become available. 1. P/NC is limited to students in grades 11-12 unless otherwise specified. 2. Students must fulfill the minimum graduation requirements in the core curricular areas prior to requesting a P/NC option in that area. 3. Students must fulfill four of the six minimum elective graduation requirements prior to requesting a P/NC option in that area. 4. Courses meeting specific graduation requirements such as Consumer Education, Health and the computer requirement may not be taken as P/NC. However, students enrolled in Driver Education (at any grade level) may apply for the P/NC option. 5. Courses in band or chorus, which are not considered to be major courses, may be taken P/NC (applicable to students in grades 9 through 12). 6. Students may enroll in only one course for P/NC per semester or per summer term. 7. Students requesting P/NC must do so in writing no later than 10 school days prior to the final exam in that course. Forms for requesting this option will be signed by the student, parent, teacher, and respective counselor, and be retained on file in the counselors office. 8. Students taking this option must earn a C- or better to be given credit in a course. The codes P (pass) or NC (no credit) will appear on the transcript. 9. Advanced Placement (AP), Dual Credit, and PLTW courses may not be taken on a P/NC basis or for audit purposes. 10. Students must be enrolled in at least five full-credit (.5 credits per semester) bearing courses, under regular grading procedures to be eligible. If a student drops the fourth credit-bearing course, then the P/NC option reverts to normal grading. 11. P/NC option is available in summer school only if students fulfilled the minimum graduation requirements in any curricular area prior to requesting the P/NC option. 12. P/NC courses will be counted toward graduation in the same way as any other course, but will not be included in the grade point average. If a student earns an A or B and requests, 10 school days prior to the final exam in that course, it be changed from P/NC to a grade, it will be included in the grade point average. 13. It is not recommended that students considering selective colleges or universities take college preparatory courses for P/NC. Students and parents are advised to back to index 13 contact college or university personnel and consult their counselors in these instances. 14. Exceptions to the P/NC request may occur with permission from the principal or designee. CLASS RANK Class rank will be eliminated beginning with the High School Graduating Class of 2019. NOTICE OF NONDISCRIMINATION Community High School District 155 does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, age, or handicap in admission or access to, or treatment or employment in, its programs and activities. Any person having inquiries concerning the Community High School District's compliance with the regulations implementing Title VI, Title IX, the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) or Section 504 is directed to contact the CHSD 155 Superintendent, Dr. Johnnie Thomas at One South Virginia Road, Crystal Lake, IL 60014. The phone number is 815-455-8500 ext. 1023. _______________________ back to index 14 HUMANITIES back to index 15 _______________________ Art Course Flowchart back to index 16 _______________________ Art VISUAL ART BASICS This beginning level art class allows a unique opportunity for students to experience a variety of media including: drawing, painting, clay, and sculpture. This course is targeted for students participating in the Functional Living Skills Program. Visual Art Basics can be taken one or both semesters as projects are not repeated throughout the school year. This class also provides students who participate in the Best Buddies program more individual time with their buddy. Semesters: 1 Prerequisite: Staff recommendation Level: 9, 10, 11, 12 Credit: 1/2 per semester Taxonomy: 651/652 VISUAL ART AND TECHNOLOGY Set yourself apart by becoming creative problem-solvers and explore current digital technology. Many new and existing professions combine studio art skills and digital media. Students will use a combination of digital technology and creative art making to explore their world, identity, possible careers, and future. No previous experience is necessary and everyone creates at their own level. This course serves as one of two prerequisite options for all students whether they are progressing through the four-year program or are interested in a creative experience. To learn more about this course and the art program sequence, please visit your schools art department website. Semesters: 1 Prerequisite: None back to index 17 Level: 09, 10, 11, 12 Credit: 1/2 Taxonomy: 655/656 Additional Information: This course or Visual Art Inventions serves as the prerequisite for the art program sequence. It also honors the computer credit requirement for graduation. VISUAL ART INVENTIONS (Formerly Introduction to 2-D Art and Introduction to 3-D Art) Got creativity? Creative challenges are a part of everyday life. This is your opportunity to strengthen your creative and problem solving skills through the use of various art media and concepts. Media may include: drawing, painting, ceramics, jewelry, and sculpture. Students will invent solutions through individual and collaborative activities, games, and projects that reflect personal interests, values, and a global perspective. No previous art experience is necessary and everyone creates at their own level. This course serves as one of two prerequisite options for all students whether they are progressing through the four-year program or are interested in a creative experience. To learn more about this course and the art program sequence, please visit your schools art department website. Semesters: 1 Prerequisite: None Level: 09, 10, 11, 12 Credit: 1/2 Taxonomy: 653/654 Additional Information: This course or Visual Art and Technology serves as the prerequisite for the art program sequence. ART AND MEDIA TECHNIQUES This course will provide students a solid foundation in visual media techniques and processes. Students will be provided with the skills to create a variety of two-dimensional and three-dimensional artistic products. There will be a focus on studio back to index 18 practice, craftsmanship, composition and effective design solutions using the elements and principles of art (topics and media may include painting, drawing, ceramics, sculpture and color theory, perspective). Semesters: 1 Prerequisite: Successful completion of Visual Art Inventions. Level: 09, 10, 11, 12 Credit: 1/2 Taxonomy: 657/658 Additional Information: Students interested in enrolling in AP Studio need to successfully complete this course. ART AND IDENTITY (Drawing, Painting, Mixed-Media) Who am I? In Art and Identity students will learn about themselves by exploring who they are, how they want others to see them, and who they want to become. Primarily using 2-D processes and individualized instruction, students will explore and develop their personal identity through the visual arts. This intermediate course emphasizes creative individual solutions, conceptual thinking, and the development of design aesthetics while providing hands-on experience in a variety of media. Please visit the schools art department website for additional information. Semesters: 1 Prerequisite: Successful completion of Visual Art Inventions. Levels: 09, 10, 11, 12 Credit: 1/2 Taxonomy: 659/660 ART AND COMMUNITY (Ceramics, Sculpture, Mixed Media) What is my place in the world? Students enrolled in Art and Community will explore this question by using 3-D processes in both individual and group projects. This course will help students understand the impact of the arts on society, and how the arts can be a community, whether locally, globally or online. This course emphasizes creative, individual and collaborative solutions through hands-on experience and opportunities. To learn more please visit your schools art department website for current information. Semesters: 1 Prerequisite: Successful completion of Visual Art Inventions. Levels: 09, 10, 11, 12 back to index 19 Credit: 1/2 Taxonomy: 661/662 ART AND IDEAS (Formerly Mixed Media Design) What is art for? In Art and Ideas advanced students will have the opportunity to create personal artworks based upon their own aesthetic interests, tastes, and values. Students will examine and interpret art movements, and the manner in which societies have judged visual art both past and present. This course will continue to develop art skills and refine creative techniques through the use of critical thinking and reflective practices. Students will use this course as an opportunity to begin building their portfolio. To learn more about this course and the art program sequence, please visit your schools art department website. Semesters: 1 Prerequisite: Successful completion of Visual Art Inventions from Level I, two courses from Level II (including Art and Media Techniques), and division leader approval. Level: 11, 12 Credit: 1/2 Taxonomy: 669/670 ART AND CURRENT TRENDS (Mixed Media, Ceramics, Sculpture) What kind of art will your generation be known for? This course gives students the opportunity to experience what is currently happening in the art world, including public art, new technologies, mass production, street art, online art communities and new artists that challenge boundaries. Students will explore and debate postmodernism, censorship, consumerism, and global issues. Art and Current Trends offers artists open ended problems, to solve as they wish in any media of their choosing. Students will work both individually and collaboratively on projects, critiques and group installations. To learn more about this course and the art program sequence, please visit your schools art department website. Semesters: 1 Semester Prerequisite: Successful completion of Visual Art Inventions from Level 1, two courses from Level 2 including Art and Media Techniques, and division leader approval. Levels: 11, 12 Credit: 1/2 Taxonomy: 671/672 Additional Information: Fees may not cover all expenses. back to index 20 PHOTOGRAPHIC IMAGING I (Formerly Photography I) If a picture is worth 1,000 words, then what do you want to say? In Photographic Imaging I, students will examine how artists compose and manipulate images and utilize a variety of technologies to communicate ideas. Students will use traditional, digital, and experimental photographic processes. This course emphasizes problem solving, conceptual thinking, and the interpretation of images. Students will explore such avenues as commercial photography, photojournalism, and fine art photography. Please visit the art department website at your childs school for additional information. Semesters: 1 Prerequisite: Successful completion of Visual Art and Technology. Level: 09, 10, 11, 12 Credit: l/2 Taxonomy: 665/666 PHOTOGRAPHIC IMAGING II (Formerly Photography II) Influence the world through your lens. Art and Imagery 2 allows the dedicated photographer to further their skills and experiences, whether the students interest is fine art photography, photo journalism and/or commercial photography. Students will examine the function of the image in history and today through a variety of photographic processes to strengthen their personal aesthetic and style. Open ended projects will ask the photographer to interpret and capture unique solutions. Students will use this course as an opportunity to begin building their portfolio. To learn more about this course and the art program sequence, please visit your schools art department website. Semesters: 1 Prerequisite: Successful completion of Photographic Imaging I. Level: 10, 11, 12 Credit: l/2 Taxonomy: 667/668 ART AND DESIGN I (Formerly Graphic Design I) This course meets the computer requirement for graduation. Art is everywhere! Posters, t-shirts, album art, logos, and websites are just a few examples of design that influences us. In this course, students will use current digital back to index 21 technology to transform artistic ideas into persuasive visual communication. Concepts covered will include multiple image layering, the relationships of words and pictures, design aesthetics, and idea development strategies used by the expanding media industry. Please visit the schools art department website for additional information. Semesters: 1 Prerequisite: Successful completion of Visual Art and Technology. Level: 09, 10, 11, 12 Credit: l/2 Taxonomy: 663/664 ART AND DESIGN II (Formerly Graphic Design II) This course meets the computer requirement for graduation. How does design affect the world around you? Design thinking and mastery of the media arts play an essential role in todays careers. This advanced course helps students learn to utilize design thinking as a real world problem-solving skill and help designers, illustrators, and digital media artists develop their individual style. Students will be given opportunities to produce work for someone other than themselves as they would for a client or art director. Projects may include t-shirt designs, animation, posters, web pages, video, logos or publicity for a variety of events, from school to local contests and even community jobs. Students will use this course as an opportunity to begin building their design portfolio. To learn more about this course and the art program sequence, please visit your schools art department website. Semesters: 1 Prerequisite: Successful completion of Art and Visual Communication (Graphic Design I) or division leader approval. Level: 10, 11, 12 Credit: l/2 Taxonomy: 673/674 PORTFOLIO: 2D AND 3D Portfolio provides experienced art students with continued opportunities to individually explore personal art interests and advance their learning experiences as productive artists. This course offers students involvement in a creative, collaborative atmosphere where they will develop their own direction resulting in the creation of a cohesive body of work for portfolio and exhibition purposes. Curriculum project concepts and media are self-directed with the teacher acting as a facilitator. back to index 22 Possible exhibitions may include solo shows or advanced group shows. Students will be encouraged to enter local and/or regional shows. Students may have possibilities to leave their mark within their school through permanent art. While much of class time is studio, students may be expected to participate in some guided individual and/or group activities meant to further their ability to plan and formulate ideas for work, verbally articulate their artistic concepts and reflect on their progress. Activities may include verbal and written critiques, the keeping of a sketchbook/journal, and periodic individual conferences with their instructor. Artwork options can be any two and/or three dimensional media which may be supported by the Art Department, though the student is encouraged to provide additional media if necessary. Efforts will be made to enroll students in sections of 2D and/or 3D Portfolio based upon preference, but some requests may not be honored due to course or instructor availability, as well as potential conflicts with the students schedule. Semesters: 1 Prerequisite: Successful completion of 5 or 6 art classes & division leader approval. Levels: 12 Credit: 1/2 Taxonomy: 6752D/6762D and 6753D/6763D Additional Information: Fees may not cover all expenses. SENIOR DESIGN AND PRODUCTION This course is intended to give the advanced graphic design and/or photography student the opportunity to have a real-world experience in their respective area. The majority of student work will be under the guidelines and wishes of various clients; be it staff or faculty in school, friends or relatives out of school or contests and opportunities found online. Advanced production techniques are stressed to develop graphic design (which may include t-shirts designs, logos, posters, etc) from idea to production-ready art for their client. Photography students may be asked to shoot in traditional or digital format. Work may include shoots for publications or events for school and creation of a production-ready file or a finished print for the client. Graphic Design and Photography students may work independently or together, depending on the job. The instructor will work as a facilitator and mentor as the student develops a body of work with the goal of professional portfolio and exhibition. Media and supplies may be supported by the Art Department, but fees may not cover all expenses. back to index 23 Semesters: 1 or 2 Semesters Successful completion of 5 or 6 art classes & division leader approval. Level(s): 12 Credit: 1/2 per semester Taxonomy: 675/676 Additional Information: Fees may not cover all expenses. ADVANCED PLACEMENT (AP) STUDIO ART 2D, 3D, and DRAWING AP Studio Art 2D, 3D and Drawing are three different year-long courses. Each of them is designed for students that are highly motivated to do college level work in studio art while still in high school. AP is also an opportunity for students to qualify for college credit in a high school environment. AP work is not based on a written exam; instead, students are required to submit portfolios for College Board evaluation at the end of the school year. As an AP student, you will build your portfolio based on three sections; quality, concentration and breadth. AP work does involve significantly more time and commitment than most high school courses. Semesters: 2 Prerequisite: Successful completion of 5 or 6 art classes (including Art and Media Techniques) & division leader approval. Level(s): 12 Credit: 1 Taxonomy: 681/682 2D, 683/684 3D, and 679/680 Drawing Additional Information: Fees may not cover all expenses including the cost of the AP exam. To learn more about this course from a CHSD 155 teacher, visit https://sites.google.com/a/d155.org/clsapcourses/humanities. To access a brief two-page course description developed by the College Board, visit http://media.collegeboard.com/digitalServices/pdf/ap/ap-course-overviews/ap-studio-art-course-overview.pdf. If interested in the Advanced Placement credit policy at a particular college or university, then please visit https://apstudent.collegeboard.org/creditandplacement/search-credit-policies. back to index 24 https://sites.google.com/a/d155.org/clsapcourses/humanitieshttp://media.collegeboard.com/digitalServices/pdf/ap/ap-course-overviews/ap-studio-art-course-overview.pdfhttp://media.collegeboard.com/digitalServices/pdf/ap/ap-course-overviews/ap-studio-art-course-overview.pdfhttps://apstudent.collegeboard.org/creditandplacement/search-credit-policies ADVANCED PLACEMENT (AP) ART HISTORY The (2012) College Board AP Course Description Guide states, The AP Art History course should engage students at the same level as an introductory college art history survey. Such a course involves critical thinking and should develop an understanding and knowledge of diverse historical and cultural contexts of architecture, sculpture, painting and other media. It also provides an opportunity for schools to strengthen an area neglected in most curricula. In this course, students examine and critically analyze major forms of artistic expression from the past and the present from a variety of cultures. While visual analysis is a fundamental tool of the art historian, art history emphasizes understanding how and why works of art function in context, considering such issues as patronage, gender, and the functions and effects of works of art. Many colleges and universities offer advanced placement and/or credit to students who perform successfully on the AP Art History Exam. This course is targeting students that are highly motivated, demonstrate critical thinking skills and strong literacy skills, as well as express an interest and passion for both history and the arts. As a result of participating in this course, students will prepare (and are expected to take) the AP Art History exam. Semesters: 2 Prerequisite: None Level(s): 10, 11, 12 Credit: 1 Taxonomy: 685/686 Additional Information: Fees may not cover all expenses including the cost of the AP exam. To access a brief two-page overview of this course developed by the College Board, please visit https://secure-media.collegeboard.org/digitalServices/pdf/ap/ap-course-overviews/ap-art-history-2015-2016-course-overview.pdf If interested in the Advanced Placement credit policy at a particular college or university, then please visit https://apstudent.collegeboard.org/creditandplacement/search-credit-policies. back to index 25 https://secure-media.collegeboard.org/digitalServices/pdf/ap/ap-course-overviews/ap-art-history-2015-2016-course-overview.pdfhttps://secure-media.collegeboard.org/digitalServices/pdf/ap/ap-course-overviews/ap-art-history-2015-2016-course-overview.pdfhttps://apstudent.collegeboard.org/creditandplacement/search-credit-policies_______________________ ENGLISH COURSE SEQUENCE back to index 26 _______________________ English back to index 27 Community High School District 155 offers students a variety of English courses. Each course except Intensive Reading Level 1 and Targeted Reading Level 1 yields credit per semester towards the four English credits required for graduation. Students who successfully complete the Intensive Reading Level 1 or Targeted Reading Level 1 course will earn elective credit per semester. All English courses emphasize the important language arts skills: reading, literature, writing, grammar and usage, word study and vocabulary, speaking and listening, critical and creative thinking, spelling and punctuation, and research. Basic Level FRESHMAN ENGLISH I This freshman level English course provides support for students who are developing skills in the areas of written communication, reading comprehension, speaking and listening, and grammar. Placement is only available through staff conference recommendation. Semesters: 2 Prerequisite: None Level: 9 Credit: 1/2 per semester Taxonomy: 011/012 INTENSIVE READING LEVEL 1 This two semester course is required for freshmen in need of improved reading skills. The content of the course focuses on developing fluency, vocabulary, and comprehension. In addition to reading, this course provides students with further practice in writing, including developing sentences, paragraphs, and essays. Semesters: 2 Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in English I. EXPLORE English and Reading scores of approximately 10 or below, as well as a recommendation through a staff conference. Level: 9 Credit: 1/2 elective credit per semester back to index 28 Taxonomy: 071/072 SOPHOMORE ENGLISH II This sophomore level English course places an emphasis on building students abilities to gain information and ideas from a variety of sources, recognize and respond to ideas expressed in various forms of literature, plan and effectively convey messages to a variety of audiences, utilize effective listening and speaking skills, and organize information for meaningful communication. Placement is only available through staff conference recommendation. Semesters: 2 Prerequisite: Successful completion of Freshman English I Level:10 Credit: 1/2 per semester Taxonomy: 013/014 JUNIOR ENGLISH III This junior level English course emphasizes the application of ideas, issues, and perspectives from literature to real world situations. Students will focus on evaluating information from a variety of sources and communicating effectively with others. Basic skills including grammar, vocabulary, reading, and writing are addressed as well. Placement is only available through staff recommendation. Semesters: 2 Prerequisite: Level: 11 Credit: 1/2 per semester Taxonomy: 015/016 SENIOR ENGLISH IV This senior level English course provides support for students who are continuing to develop basic skills in the areas of grammar, vocabulary, reading, and writing. Emphasis is placed on students abilities to evaluate information, apply knowledge toward real world circumstances, and effectively communicate with peers and others in the community. Placement is only available through staff conference recommendation. Semesters: 2 Prerequisite: Level: 12 back to index 29 Credit: 1/2 per semester Taxonomy: 017/018 General Level FRESHMAN CLIMB ENGLISH The purpose of CLIMB is to provide an environment for students which is designed to increase reading, writing, and thinking skills. The curriculum includes a special focus on developing reading and writing strategies for students who have a reading level at least one and a half years below grade level. In most instances, students enrolled in Freshman Climb English will also be enrolled in Targeted Reading Level 1. Semesters: 2 Prerequisite: Approval of the division leader. Level: 9 Credit: 1/2 per semester Taxonomy: 171/172 TARGETED READING LEVEL 1 This two semester course is required for freshmen in need of stronger reading skills. Students will become better at making predictions, connections, and questions to find deeper meaning. They will apply strategies when reading difficult text and engage in meaningful dialogue with classmates. They will actively monitor and track their development as readers through a variety of ways, including a journaling system. They will support their opinions with examples and be able to create conditions both in and out of school in which they can read successfully. In most instances, students enrolled in Targeted Reading Level 1 will also be enrolled in Freshman Climb English. Semesters: 2 Prerequisite: EXPLORE English scores of approximately 11 to 12 and Reading scores of approximately 11 to 13, as well as a recommendation by the division leader. Level: 9 Credit: 1/2 elective credit per semester Taxonomy: 157/158 FRESHMAN ENGLISH 101 and 102 This two semester course is required of freshmen. This course provides the skills and knowledge needed to be successful in all other high school English courses. As a result back to index 30 of taking this course, students will understand the elements of the writing process, develop fundamental writing skills, and apply grammar skills effectively. They will read with comprehension and fluency and acquire, assess, and communicate information through research. Semesters: 2 Prerequisite: Level: 9 Credit: l/2 per semester Taxonomy: 101/102 SOPHOMORE CLIMB ENGLISH The purpose of CLIMB is to provide an environment for students which is designed to increase reading, writing, and thinking skills. The curriculum includes a special focus on developing reading and writing strategies for students who have a reading level at least one and a half years below grade level. Semesters: 2 Prerequisite: Approval of division leader. Level: 10 Credit: 1/2 per semester Taxonomy: 173/174 SOPHOMORE ENGLISH This two semester sophomore course links reading, writing, speaking, and thinking in an integrated context. It includes a variety of texts including novels, non-fiction, poetry, short stories, and drama. The units are designed so that students may learn to be thoughtful and analytical readers, writers, and speakers. Semesters: 2 Prerequisite: English 101/102 Level: 10 Credit:1/2 per semester Taxonomy: 113/114 JUNIOR CLIMB ENGLISH back to index 31 The purpose of CLIMB is to provide an environment for students which is designed to increase reading, writing, and thinking skills. The curriculum includes a special focus on developing reading and writing strategies for students who have a reading level at least one and a half years below grade level. Semesters: 2 Prerequisite: Approval of the division leader. Level: 11 Credit: 1/2 per semester Taxonomy: 175/176 JUNIOR ENGLISH Students will continue to develop the reading, writing, listening, speaking and research skills that were explored and developed in freshman and sophomore English. Students will be challenged to explore style, tone, and syntax for varied purposes and audiences. Students will explore a variety of genres of literature and nonfiction during this year-long course. Semesters: 2 Prerequisite: English 113/114 Level: 11 Credit: 1/2 per semester Taxonomy: 121/122 SENIOR CLIMB ENGLISH The purpose of CLIMB is to provide an environment for students which is designed to increase reading, writing, and thinking skills. The curriculum includes a special focus on developing reading and writing strategies for students who have a reading level at least one and a half years below grade level. Semesters: 2 Prerequisite: Division Leader approval Level: 12 Credit:1/2 per semester Taxonomy: 177/178 BRITISH LITERATURE I back to index 32 British Literature I is a one semester course designed to introduce students to the literature and language of England. The chronological approach highlights the growth of a national literature from the Anglo-Saxon period through the Medieval, Elizabethan, Jacobean, and Puritan Times, ending with the 18th century Restoration period. Heavy emphasis is placed on Chaucer and Shakespeare. Semesters: 1 Prerequisite: Successful completion of Freshman, Sophomore and Junior English. Level: 12 Credit:1/2 Taxonomy: 123 BRITISH LITERATURE II This course is designed to introduce students to the literature and language of England from the Romantics to the present. By surveying representative writings from the age of scientific, social, economic and political revolutions (Frankenstein, Wordsworth, Blake, and others) we establish our focus on the theme of change and the device of satire and trace them through the Victorian Era to modern times. Semesters: 1 Prerequisite: Successful completion of Freshman, Sophomore, Junior English, as well as British Literature I. Level: 12 Credit: l/2 Taxonomy: 124 MYTH AND LEGEND This course examines Greek mythology, hero stories, and epic poems such as The Iliad and The Aeneid. A further unit of study concentrates on the hero's special attributes as they relate to the Arthur Legend and the changing role of heroes in societies. Semesters: 1 Prerequisite: Successful completion of Freshmen, Sophomore and Junior English. Level: 12 Credit: l/2 Taxonomy: 126 ADVANCED WRITING back to index 33 Students will refine their knowledge of writing modes and develop their effective writing skills and strategies. Special emphasis is devoted to the writing process. Semesters: 1 Prerequisite: Successful completion of Freshmen, Sophomore and Junior English. Level: 12 Credit: 1/2 Taxonomy: 129/130 HUMANITIES I Students study the ideas, feelings, accomplishments, and hopes of humanity as expressed in literature, art, photography, music, philosophy, history, and architecture. It is an experience in the arts through involvement in reading, class discussion, and frequent writing assignments. Additional Information: This course is not approved by the NCAA Clearinghouse. Student athletes that have aspirations to compete at the collegiate level should not enroll in this course because it may negatively impact their scholarship opportunities or possibly impact other college entrance related matters. Semesters: 1 Prerequisite: Successful completion of Freshmen, Sophomore and Junior English. Level: 12 Credit: 1/2 Taxonomy: 133 HUMANITIES II This course is independent of Humanities I. Students study the ideas, feelings, accomplishments, and hopes of humanity as expressed in literature, art, photography, music, philosophy, history, and architecture. It is an experience in the arts through involvement in reading, class discussion, and frequent writing assignments. Additional Information: This course is not approved by the NCAA Clearinghouse. Student athletes that have aspirations to compete at the collegiate level should not enroll in this course because it may negatively impact their scholarship opportunities or possibly impact other college entrance related matters. Semesters: 1 back to index 34 Prerequisite: Successful completion of Freshmen, Sophomore and Junior English, as well as Humanities I. Level: 12 Credit: 1/2 Taxonomy: 134 BEST SELLERS Best Sellers is a literature based course focusing on best selling literature from recent decades. Students will explore a variety of literary genres and themes and will read between five and seven books throughout the course of the semester. Class discussion, critical reading strategies, and independent reading projects are the primary forms of assessment. Semesters: 1 Prerequisite: Successful completion of Freshmen, Sophomore and Junior English. Level: 12 Credit: l/2 Taxonomy: 137/138 COMMUNICATIONS This course will develop students into competent communicators in a variety of contexts. They will become more effective senders and receivers of information through research, analysis, synthesis and presentation. They will also effectively understand, craft and utilize language. They will cover a broad approach to oral communication skills including intrapersonal, interpersonal, group communication, and public speaking. The skills students learn will enable them to become an effective communicator and study the influence of such factors as public speaking, listening, nonverbal communication, interviewing, persuasion, and argumentation and debate. Semesters: 1 Prerequisite: Successful completion of Freshmen, Sophomore and Junior English. Level: 12 Credit: l/2 Taxonomy: 135/136 CREATIVE WRITING This course provides opportunities for students to express themselves in the writing of various literary forms. A journal may be required. Creative writing is a writing lab aimed at personal development in creative expression. back to index 35 Semesters: 1 Prerequisite: Successful completion of Freshmen, Sophomore and Junior English. Level: 12 Credit: l/2 Taxonomy: 134 DRAMATIC LITERATURE Students are required to read and prepare written analyses of the works of the worlds major playwrights. This course also emphasizes all aspects of theatre: theatre history, technical theatre, and play production. Students are trained in skills of sense awareness, stage movement, stage speech, and the development of emotion and character. They select, rehearse, and present several memorized and carefully prepared scenes. Semesters: 1 Prerequisite: Successful completion of Freshmen, Sophomore and Junior English. Level: 12 Credit: 1/2 Taxonomy:141/142 RHETORICAL ANALYSIS OF MEDIA In order to become critical consumers, students must learn to evaluate how their opinions, attitudes, and actions are influenced by what they see, watch, and read. In this course students will recognize, evaluate, and create varying types of media, including but not limited to advertising, news, film, television, and the World Wide Web. A heavy emphasis will be placed on formal writing and creative projects, as well as honing critical thinking skills. This course is not approved by the NCAA Clearinghouse. Student athletes that have aspirations to compete at the collegiate level should not enroll in this course because it may negatively impact their scholarship opportunities or possibly impact other college entrance related matters. back to index 36 Semesters: 1 Prerequisite: Successful completion of Freshmen, Sophomore and Junior English. Level: 12 Credit:1/2 Taxonomy: 147/148 Honors Level FRESHMAN ENGLISH 101(H) and 102 (H) This two semester course is a freshman honors course. Students who have already mastered the grammar and mechanics of writing will pursue higher-level thinking skills and more sophisticated composition forms and techniques. To be enrolled in this course an incoming freshman must exhibit superior language arts abilities. Placement is determined by the EXPLORE test, a writing sample, and eighth grade teacher recommendation. Semesters: 2 Prerequisite: Stated in course description Level: 9 Credit: 1/2 per semester Taxonomy: 103/104 SOPHOMORE ENGLISH (H) This two semester sophomore honors course links reading, writing, speaking, and thinking in an integrated context. Students are expected to have outstanding communication skills and are expected to work competently both individually and in teams. Placement is determined by achieving a B- or better in English 101(H) and 102 (H) or freshman teacher recommendation, reading scores, and a writing sample. Semesters: 2 Prerequisite: English 101H, 102H or teacher recommendation Level: 10 Credit: 1/2 per semester Taxonomy: 115/116 JUNIOR ENGLISH (H) This two semester honors course is targeted for students in grade 11. Students will examine their role and responsibilities in a contemporary global society by engaging in back to index 37 diverse works. They will apply critical reading strategies for comprehension and write well with attention to usage, punctuation, and style. Students will also ethically acquire, evaluate, and employ diverse resources to communicate information and ideas for a variety of purposes. Throughout the course, students are expected to take immediate responsibility for independent learning; guided practice will be provided when needed. Students are expected to review and study class material consistently in addition to completing assigned homework. These characteristics are necessary because the course moves at an accelerated pace. Semesters: 2 Prerequisite: B- or better for students enrolled in Sophomore (H) is recommended. For students enrolled in Sophomore English 210, teacher recommendation is required. Level: 11 Credit:1/2 per semester Taxonomy: 149/150 Advanced Placement Level AP LANGUAGE & COMPOSITION Students will recognize and analyze rhetorical strategies and devices (e.g. diction, tone, syntax, voice) in written work and utilize these skills to produce their own written arguments. Heavy emphasis will be placed on critical thinking and reading which will be useful in college classes as well as real life situations. During the second semester, students will build upon and refine skills and strategies. A goal of the course is to prepare students for the AP Language and Composition exam. Semesters: 2 Prerequisite: A or B average in previous English coursework is recommended. Approval of the Division Leader is required. Level: 11 Credit: l/2 per semester Taxonomy: 131/132 Additional Information: Fees may not cover all expenses including the cost of the AP exam. To access a brief two-page overview of this course developed by the College Board, please visit back to index 38 http://media.collegeboard.com/digitalServices/pdf/ap/ap-course-overviews/ap-english-language-course-overview.pdf To learn more about these courses, visit https://sites.google.com/a/d155.org/clsapcourses/humanities. If interested in the Advanced Placement credit policy at a particular college or university, then please visit https://apstudent.collegeboard.org/creditandplacement/search-credit-policies. AP LITERATURE & COMPOSITION The College Board describes this course as a course that engages students in the careful reading and critical analysis of imaginative literature. Through the close reading of selected texts, students deepen their understanding of the ways writers use language to provide both meaning and pleasure for their readers. As they read, students consider a works structure, style and themes, as well as such smaller-scale elements as the use of figurative language, imagery, symbolism and tone. A goal of the course is to prepare students for the AP Literature and Composition exam. Semesters: 2 Prerequisites: A or B average in previous coursework is recommended. Approval of the Division Leader is required. Level: 11, 12 Credit: per semester Taxonomy: 151/152 Additional Information: Fees may not cover all expenses including the cost of the AP exam. To learn more about this course from a CHSD 155 teacher, visit https://sites.google.com/a/d155.org/clsapcourses/humanities. To access a brief two-page overview of this course developed by the College Board, please visit https://secure-media.collegeboard.org/digitalServices/pdf/ap/ap-course-overviews/ap-english-literature-course-overview.pdf. If interested in the Advanced Placement credit policy at a particular college or university, then please visit back to index 39 http://media.collegeboard.com/digitalServices/pdf/ap/ap-course-overviews/ap-english-language-course-overview.pdfhttp://media.collegeboard.com/digitalServices/pdf/ap/ap-course-overviews/ap-english-language-course-overview.pdfhttps://sites.google.com/a/d155.org/clsapcourses/humanitieshttps://apstudent.collegeboard.org/creditandplacement/search-credit-policieshttps://sites.google.com/a/d155.org/clsapcourses/humanitieshttps://secure-media.collegeboard.org/digitalServices/pdf/ap/ap-course-overviews/ap-english-literature-course-overview.pdfhttps://secure-media.collegeboard.org/digitalServices/pdf/ap/ap-course-overviews/ap-english-literature-course-overview.pdfhttps://apstudent.collegeboard.org/creditandplacement/search-credit-policies. ADVANCED PLACEMENT (AP) SEMINAR CHSD 155 is leading nation-wide efforts in offering special AP coursework like AP Seminar. This course is not currently a common course offering in most districts. CHSD 155 had to apply to the College Board and receive special permission to include it in the course catalog. The College Board describes AP Seminar as a foundational course that engages students in cross-curricular conversations that explore the complexities of academic and real-world topics and issues by analyzing divergent perspectives. Using an inquiry framework, students practice reading and analyzing articles, research studies, and foundational, literary, and philosophical texts; listening to and viewing speeches, broadcasts, and personal accounts; and experiencing artistic works and performances. Students learn to synthesize information from multiple sources, develop their own perspectives in written essay, and design and deliver oral and visual presentations, both individually and as part of a team. Ultimately, the course aims to equip students with the power to analyze and evaluate information with accuracy and precision in order to craft and communicated evidence-based arguments. AP Seminar is part of the College Board AP Capstone Program which also includes the course AP Research. Students that successfully complete these two courses by earning an honor score of 3 or higher, as well as receive honor scores on four additional AP exams may have an opportunity to receive the AP Capstone Diploma or AP Seminar and Research Certificate. To access a brief two-page overview of this course developed by the College Board, please visit http://media.collegeboard.com/digitalServices/pdf/ap/ap-capstone/ap-seminar-course-overview.pdf. For more comprehensive information, please visit http://media.collegeboard.com/digitalServices/pdf/ap/ap-course-exam-descriptions/ap-seminar-course-and-exam-description.pdf. Students may be subject to additional fees including the $139 AP assessment fee. Semesters: 2 Prerequisites: Approval of the Division Leader is required. back to index 40 https://apstudent.collegeboard.org/creditandplacement/search-credit-policieshttp://media.collegeboard.com/digitalServices/pdf/ap/ap-capstone/ap-seminar-course-overview.pdfhttp://media.collegeboard.com/digitalServices/pdf/ap/ap-capstone/ap-seminar-course-overview.pdfhttp://media.collegeboard.com/digitalServices/pdf/ap/ap-course-exam-descriptions/ap-seminar-course-and-exam-description.pdfhttp://media.collegeboard.com/digitalServices/pdf/ap/ap-course-exam-descriptions/ap-seminar-course-and-exam-description.pdfLevel: 10, 11, 12 Credit: per semester Taxonomy: 179/180 ADVANCED PLACEMENT (AP) RESEARCH CHSD 155 is leading nation-wide efforts in offering special AP coursework like AP Research. This course is not currently a common course offering in most districts. CHSD 155 had to apply to the College Board and receive special permission to include it in the course catalog. The College Board describes AP Seminar as a course that allows students to deeply explore an academic topic, problem, issue, or idea of individual interest. Students design,plan, and implement a yearlong investigation to address a research question. Through this inquiry, they further the skills they acquired in the AP Seminar course by learning research methodology, employing ethical research practices, and accessing, analyzing, and synthesizing information. Students reflect on their skill development, document their process and reflection portfolio. The course culminates in a an academic paper of approximately 4,000-5,000 words (accompanied by a performance, exhibit, or product where applicable) and a presentation with an oral defense. AP Research is part of the College Board AP Capstone Program which also includes the course AP Seminar. Students that successfully complete these two courses by earning an honor score of 3 or higher, as well as receive honor scores on four additional AP exams may have an opportunity to receive the AP Capstone Diploma or AP Seminar and Research Certificate. To access a brief two-page overview of this course developed by the College Board, please visit https://secure-media.collegeboard.org/digitalServices/pdf/ap/ap-capstone/ap-research-course-overview.pdf. For more comprhensive information, please visit https://secure-media.collegeboard.org/digitalServices/pdf/ap/ap-research-course-and-exam-decription.pdf. Students may be subject to additional fees including the $139 AP assessment fee. Semesters: 2 Prerequisites: Approval of the Division Leader is required. back to index 41 https://secure-media.collegeboard.org/digitalServices/pdf/ap/ap-capstone/ap-research-course-overview.pdfhttps://secure-media.collegeboard.org/digitalServices/pdf/ap/ap-capstone/ap-research-course-overview.pdfhttps://secure-media.collegeboard.org/digitalServices/pdf/ap/ap-research-course-and-exam-decription.pdfhttps://secure-media.collegeboard.org/digitalServices/pdf/ap/ap-research-course-and-exam-decription.pdfLevel: 11, 12 Credit: per semester Taxonomy: 181APR/182APR _______________________ Music MUSIC THEORY This course is designed for beginners in music theory. The materials covered provide a sound basis toward the understanding and application of the fundamentals of music. It is also designed to enhance the music students performance skills through the study of rhythmic, melodic, and harmonic concepts. This is an excellent preparatory course for first-semester college theory, but not a prerequisite for AP Music Theory. Semesters: 1 Prerequisite: Level: 10, 11, 12 Credit: 1/2 per semester Taxonomy: 781/782 back to index 42 AP MUSIC THEORY (H) AP Music Theory is a college-level course for serious music students. The course is equivalent to a first-semester music theory course for music majors, introducing the student to musicianship, theory, musical materials, and procedures. Musicianship skills such as dictation, sight-singing, and keyboard harmony are an important part of the course. The students ability to read and write musical notation is fundamental to the course. By the end of the course, the students will have mastery in the following areas: notation, scales, metric organization, intervals, analysis, chords, and form. Semesters: 2 Prerequisite: Approval of instructor Level: 10, 11, 12 Credit: 1/2 per semester Taxonomy: 783/784 Additional Information: To access a two-brief page course overview developed by the College Board, visit http://media.collegeboard.com/digitalServices/pdf/ap/ap-course-overviews/ap-music-theory-course-overview.pdf. MUSIC APPRECIATION This course is designed for students who want to learn more about the history of music and musicians. The course starts with the basics of music and continues with medieval music to American popular music and world music. The course will take a look at each period of music, its composers, type of music, and utilize many recorded examples. Semesters: 1 Level: 10, 11, 12 Credit: 1/2 per semester Taxonomy: 785/786 MUSIC APPRECIATION (DUAL CREDIT) This course is designed for students who want to learn more about the history of music and musicians. The course starts with the basics of music and continues with medieval music to American popular music and world music. The course will take a look at each period of music, its composers, type of music, and utilize many recorded examples. Students that complete a semester of Music Appreciation with a C or better will also earn 3 credits from McHenry County College (MCC) for the course titled MUS 151 back to index 43 http://media.collegeboard.com/digitalServices/pdf/ap/ap-course-overviews/ap-music-theory-course-overview.pdfhttp://media.collegeboard.com/digitalServices/pdf/ap/ap-course-overviews/ap-music-theory-course-overview.pdfMusic Appreciation. The course is offered at CHSD 155 schools and taught by CHSD 155 instructors that meet MCC instructor requirements. In some instances, students may be required to purchase an additional textbook, workbook or other related course material at MCC as a result of this partnership. Students in grade 12 will have the opportunity to travel to another school for this course in the event that dual credit is unavailable at his/her home high school. In these instances, students are required to provide their own transportation. Enrollment may be limited and therefore, students in grade 12 will be given priority. The MCC High School Plus Registration Form available at https://www.mchenry.edu/highschoolplus/hsplus_reg_form.pdf must be completed with the required signatures and submitted to the counselors office. CHSD 155 does not guarantee every post high school institution will accept the MCC credits, so parents and students are encouraged to communicate with the admissions officer at the college or university of interest regarding this matter. The grading scale at MCC is different than CHSD 155. MCC does not award letter grades with plusses or minuses which is different than the grading system in CHSD 155. For instance, a B+ earned in CHSD 155 is a B at MCC. As a result, grades reported on the MCC and CHSD 155 report cards and transcripts may vary. Students will receive an additional report card from MCC including grade(s) and course credit information. Semesters: 1 Prerequisite: Approval of department chairperson Level: 11, 12 CHSD 155 Credit: 1/2 per semester MCC Credit: 3 per semester Taxonomy: 785DC/786DC BAND I This class is designed for those students who have little or no previous instrumental experience yet have demonstrated a desire to learn. Emphasis is placed upon beginning instrumental methods with additional concentration in the understanding of instrumental technique, rhythmic accuracy, tone, intonation and general music terms and concepts. Although no audition is required, the student should consult with the instructor prior to the start of the semester. In some cases a school instrument will be provided for the first year. back to index 44 https://www.mchenry.edu/highschoolplus/hsplus_reg_form.pdfhttps://www.mchenry.edu/highschoolplus/hsplus_reg_form.pdf Semesters: 2 Prerequisite: No previous musical experience; approval of instructor Level: 9, 10, 11, 12 Credit: l/4 per semester Taxonomy: 753/754 BAND II This class will continue to develop instrumental techniques and methods through the performance of appropriate wind literature. This class furthers understanding and development of ensemble rehearsal techniques and studies. This organization may combine with the Advanced Bands in the fall for the marching band season and will perform at numerous school, community and district functions. This group serves as the preparatory ensemble to the Advanced Bands. Membership and seating is by audition only. Semesters: 2 Prerequisite: Previous instrumental experience and audition with director Level: 9, 10, 11, 12 Credit: l/4 per semester Taxonomy: 755/756 BAND III These classes offer music students opportunities to study and perform literature ranging in various difficulty and music styles. Emphasis is placed upon performance and continued understanding of musical skills and concepts. Members of these organizations may combine with the Intermediate Band for the fall marching band season. Membership for these organizations is determined by audition only. Semesters: 2 Prerequisite: Previous instrumental experience and audition with director Level: 9, 10, 11, 12 Credit: l/4 per semester Taxonomy: 757/758 BAND IV back to index 45 This is an ensemble for students with advanced skills. Students are placed by audition after demonstrating the highest proficiency on their instrument. Emphasis is placed on the teaching and performing of the most advanced literature with the subtleties and nuances of interpretation as a primary goal. Music history and theory are applied through the use of appropriate forms and styles of music. Semesters: 2 Prerequisite: Previous instrumental experience and audition with director Level: 9, 10, 11, 12 Credit: l/4 per semester Taxonomy: 759/760 PERCUSSION STUDIES This course is designed to address the specific needs of the student of the percussion section of the instrumental music program. Topics covered include an intense study of rhythm and rudimental techniques unique to the percussion section. Also covered is the marching drumline, drumset, keyboard mallet techniques, timpani, color and auxiliary percussion. Students will work as both an independent percussion ensemble and as members of the regular concert bands. All ability levels are placed in the class. Semesters: 2 Prerequisite: Previous instrumental experience & audition with the instructor. Level: 9, 10, 11, 12 Credit: 1/4 credit per semester Taxonomy: 763/764 BEGINNING TREBLE CHOIR This choir is made up predominantly of freshmen. This group concentrates on sight-reading, three-part harmony (SSA), ear-training, musical terms, etc. The group appears at several performances each school year. Semesters: 2 Prerequisite: Semester 1: None; Semester 2: Consent of instructor Level: 9, 10, 11 Credit: l/4 per semester Taxonomy: 765/766 ADVANCED TREBLE CHOIR back to index 46 This is a chorus of students ranging from sophomores through seniors who are advanced sight-readers and singers. This group concentrates on sight reading, ear training and score reading. The choir sings predominantly SSAA arrangements, and appears at several public performances each school year. Semesters: 2 Prerequisite: Previous vocal experience and audition with director Level: 10, 11, 12 Credit: l/4 per semester Taxonomy: 767/768 BASS CHOIR This is a chorus of students ranging from freshmen through seniors. This group concentrates on sight-reading, ear training, and development of the bass voice through a variety of literature (TTBB). This group appears at several performances each year and is available at participating schools. Semesters: 2 Prerequisites: Level: 9 Semester 1: None; Semester 2: Instructor consent Prerequisites: Level 10, 11, 12: Consent of instructor Credit: 1/4 per semester Taxonomy: 777/778 BEGINNING CHORUS This chorus is made up predominantly of freshmen. This group concentrates on sight-reading, four-part harmony, ear-training, musical terms, etc. The group appears at several public performances each school year. Semesters: 2 Prerequisite: Semester 1: None; Semester 2: Consent of instructor Level: 9, 10, 11, 12 Credit: l/4 per semester Taxonomy: 769/770 ADVANCED CHORUS Mixed voices (SATB) concentrate on repertoire and sight-reading, and is a continuation of skills from beginning chorus. This group also makes public appearances each school year. back to index 47 Semesters: 2 Prerequisite: Previous vocal experience and audition with director Level: 9, 10, 11, 12 Credit: l/4 per semester Taxonomy: 771/772 A CAPPELLA SINGERS This group is composed of students who have demonstrated an understanding and mastery of choral skills introduced in the beginning and advanced choirs. The curriculum includes music theory, vocal pedagogy and technique, and sight-reading. The literature includes a large variety of advanced material. This prestigious group often performs publicly. A tour may be included as part of the class, depending on the instructor. Semesters: 2 Prerequisite: Previous vocal experience and audition with director Level: 10, 11, 12 Credit: l/4 per semester Taxonomy: 773/774 back to index 48 _______________________ back to index 49 INDUSTRY & CAREERS back to index 50 _______________________ Business Education INTRODUCTION TO BUSINESS I This course meets the Consumer Education requirement for graduation. Do you know what it takes to make wise economic decisions to help you reach your financial goals? Do you have what it takes to create a business? Do you know how to make money work for you? This course is designed to give you an understanding of the American economy and your roles in an ever-changing marketplace. Personal finance units include: checking, money management, credit, saving and investing, insurance and comparison shopping. Other units include: economics, the United States market system, and entrepreneurship. Learn and apply what is needed to live in the real world! Semesters: 1 Prerequisite: None Level: 9, 10 Credit: 1/2 Taxonomy: 479/480 INTRODUCTION TO BUSINESS II The objectives of this course are to give the students a better understanding of the role of citizens and government in our economic system and to further examine the role of consumers in specialized areas. Topics that are covered include making career decisions, our private enterprise system, the effects of government and labor on our economy, saving and investing, and insurance. Semesters: 1 Prerequisite: None back to index 51 Level: 9, 10 Credit: 1/2 Taxonomy: 481/482 ACCOUNTING I-II Accounting is an essential aspect of every business organization. These courses will give you a basic understanding of accounting principles and procedures used for recording, classifying, and summarizing financial data. You will use the financial terms, forms, records and statements found in the business world. You will perform accounting tasks both on paper and also with the latest accounting software. Although Accounting I and II are designed to be taken during one academic year, Accounting I will give you a basic foundation for understanding this lucrative career. Students enrolled in this course may also qualify for articulated college credit as a result of the Districts partnership with McHenry County College (MCC). In order to qualify, a student must meet each of the requirements described on the form titled, Course Articulation Agreement. Qualifications include, but are not limited to successfully completion of both Accounting I and II by earning a C- or better, enrollment at MCC within 27 months upon graduation from high school, and completion of the Course Articulation Agreement. Students that meet these qualifications may receive 3 articulated credits for the MCC course titled, Basic Accounting Procedures (ACC 110). Semesters: 2 Prerequisite: None Level: 10, 11, 12 Credit: 1/2 per semester Taxonomy: 485 I and 486 II Course Articulation Agreement Form is available at https://drive.google.com/a/d155.org/?tab=wo#folders/0BzqwdkoUMYvlZGVBY1JSNjh6UkE OFFICE PROCEDURES AND TECHNOLOGY A course designed to promote success in office related careers. Areas covered for skill development include: Human relations, specialized office word processing, shorthand and speed-writing techniques, telephone and mail systems, business English, calculators, dictaphone and filing. back to index 52 https://drive.google.com/a/d155.org/?tab=wo#folders/0BzqwdkoUMYvlZGVBY1JSNjh6UkEhttps://drive.google.com/a/d155.org/?tab=wo#folders/0BzqwdkoUMYvlZGVBY1JSNjh6UkEhttps://drive.google.com/a/d155.org/?tab=wo#folders/0BzqwdkoUMYvlZGVBY1JSNjh6UkE Semesters: 1 Prerequisite: Keyboarding/Formatting II Level: 11, 12 Credit: l/2 Taxonomy: COMPUTER BUSINESS APPLICATIONS I (DUAL CREDIT) This course meets the Computer requirement for graduation. This course gives students an opportunity to learn how to apply computer skills used at school, home and a business environment. It builds upon computer literacy concepts taught earlier in general education classes. Instruction in this course focuses specifically on the use of software packages and hardware that form a core used by a person employed in business, marketing or management occupation. Microsoft Office software is used to create documents for word processing, spreadsheets, databases, presentations, web pages, desktop publishing and other related matters. Some students may be able to use this course as a starting point if they are interested in obtaining MOUS (Microsoft Office User Specialist) certification. Computer Business Applications I is offered at CHSD 155 schools and taught by CHSD 155 instructors that meet MCC instructor requirements. Students that successfully complete this course with a C- or better have an opportunity to earn 3 credits from McHenry County College (MCC). CHSD 155 does not guarantee every post high school institution will accept the MCC credits, so parents and students are encouraged to communicate with the admissions officer at the college or university of interest regarding this matter. The grading scale at MCC is different than CHSD 155. MCC does not award letter grades with pluses or minuses which is different than the grading system in CHSD 155. For instance, a B+ earned in CHSD 155 is a B at MCC. As a result, grades reported on the MCC and CHSD 155 report cards, as well as transcripts may vary. The MCC High School Plus Registration Form available at https://www.mchenry.edu/highschoolplus/hsplus_reg_form.pdf must be completed with the required signatures and submitted to the counselors office. back to index 53 https://www.mchenry.edu/highschoolplus/hsplus_reg_form.pdfhttps://www.mchenry.edu/highschoolplus/hsplus_reg_form.pdfStudents may be required to pay an MCC course materials fee at the time of registration. Please contact the Industry and Careers Division Leader at your school for additional information. Students will receive an additional report card from MCC including grade(s) and course credit information. Semesters: 1 Prerequisite: None Level: 9, 10, 11, 12 Credit: l/2 Taxonomy: 461DC/462DC TECHNOLOGY IN BUSINESS Multimedia and Web Page Design are the two main topics in this ever-changing class. Students will use scanners, digital cameras, and various software programs designed to create presentations, brochures, reports and other exciting projects. They will work with pictures, sound and video. They will also use all these elements as they design their own web page. This course is project-based with a business emphasis. Semesters: 1 Prerequisite: Computer Business Applications I or Computer Math or Tech. Ed. is recommended. Level: 10, 11, 12 Credit: l/2 Taxonomy: 463/464 MARKETING This course takes a hands-on approach to the study of marketing. Utilize the 4 Ps (product, place, price, promotion) of the marketing mix to actually plan and create a potential business for the local area. Learn what makes the consumer reach for one brand over another. Show your creativity in designing advertisements and sales promotions. Discover what so many professionals know marketing is an exciting, fun, and challenging career with great rewards. Students enrolled in this course may also qualify for articulated college credit as a result of the Districts partnership with McHenry County College (MCC). In order to qualify, a student must meet each of the requirements described on the form titled, Course Articulation Agreement. Qualifications include, but are not limited to successfully back to index 54 completion of the course by earning a C- or better, enrollment at MCC within 27 months upon graduation from high school, and completion of the Course Articulation Agreement. Students that meet these qualifications may receive 3 articulated credits for the MCC course titled, Principles of Retailing (MKT 140). Course Articulation Agreement Form is available at https://drive.google.com/a/d155.org/?tab=wo#folders/0BzqwdkoUMYvlZGVBY1JSNjh6UkE Cary-Grove High School and Crystal Lake Central students in grades 11 and 12 will participate in this course for dual credit in partnership with McHenry County College (MCC). This opportunity is possible based upon a variety of reasons, including but not limited to the Cary-Grove and Crystal Lake Central high school teachers meeting special instructor requirements mandated by MCC. Students are required to complete the MCC High School Plus Registration Form in order to participate in this course. They may access this online document by contacting Dr. Hank Harvey, Cary-Grove High School Student Services Coordinator and Mr. Steve Greiner, Crystal Lake Central High School Student Services Coordinator. In some instances, students may also be required to purchase an additional textbook, workbook or other related course material (required by MCC) as a result of this partnership. In the event that an 11th or 12th grader enrolled at another CHSD 155 high school would like to take this course for dual credit at Cary-Grove High School or Crystal Lake Central High School, then he/she may do so as long as they are in 11th or 12th grade and provide their own transportation. CHSD 155 does not guarantee every post high school institution will accept the MCC credits, so parents and students are encouraged to communicate with the admissions officer at the college or university of interest regarding this matter. The grading scale at MCC is different than CHSD 155. MCC does not award letter grades with pluses or minuses which is different than the grading system in CHSD 155. For instance, a B+ earned in CHSD 155 is a B at MCC. As a result, it is possible that the grades reported on the MCC and CHSD 155 report cards and transcripts vary. Students will receive an additional report card from MCC including grade(s) and course credit information. Semesters: 1 Prerequisite: None Level: 10, 11, 12 Credit: l/2 back to index 55 https://drive.google.com/a/d155.org/?tab=wo#folders/0BzqwdkoUMYvlZGVBY1JSNjh6UkEhttps://drive.google.com/a/d155.org/?tab=wo#folders/0BzqwdkoUMYvlZGVBY1JSNjh6UkEhttps://drive.google.com/a/d155.org/?tab=wo#folders/0BzqwdkoUMYvlZGVBY1JSNjh6UkEhttp://ww2.d155.org/cg/StudentServices2/default.aspxhttp://ww3.d155.org/clc/studentservices/Pages/CLC-Student-Services-Directory.aspxTaxonomy: 487/488 Dual Credit Taxonomy: 487DC/488DC INTERNSHIP IN MARKETING This is an individual study course designed for students who wish to do advanced study in marketing. Advanced lab experiences provide opportunities for students to gain additional skills necessary for entry level employment in the marketing industry or advanced study at the post-secondary level. A contract between the instructor and the student spelling out the goals and/or objectives of the course will be kept on file. Instructional units and student activities are directed toward distribution, selling, product-service planning, and promotion. Semesters: 1-2 Prerequisite: Marketing Level: 11, 12 Credit: 1/2 per semester Taxonomy: 489/490 KEYBOARDING/FORMATTING I This beginning course presents the correct method of operating the computer keyboard using the "touch" system. Problems include the word processing/formatting of term papers, themes, letters, tables and outlines. Students desiring to learn word processing for personal use will enroll in this course. The Pass/Fail option is available. Students enrolled in this course may also qualify for articulated college credit as a result of the Districts partnership with McHenry County College (MCC). In order to qualify, a student must meet each of the requirements described on the form titled, Course Articulation Agreement. Qualifications include, but are not limited to successfully completion of both Keyboarding/Formatting I and Keyboarding/Formatting II by earning a C- or better, enrollment at MCC within 27 months upon graduation from high school, and completion of the Course Articulation Agreement. Students that meet these qualifications may receive 3 articulated credits for the MCC course titled, Document Formatting (AOM 102). Semesters: l Prerequisite: None Level: 9, 10, 11, 12 Credit: l/2 Taxonomy: 467/468 back to index 56 https://drive.google.com/a/d155.org/?tab=wo#folders/0BzqwdkoUMYvlZGVBY1JSNjh6UkE Course Articulation Agreement Form is available at https://drive.google.com/a/d155.org/?tab=wo#folders/0BzqwdkoUMYvlZGVBY1JSNjh6UkE KEYBOARDING/FORMATTING II In addition to building speed and control, the student will receive additional skill in the production of letters, term papers, tables, and business forms. This course is recommended for personal use as well as for building technological skill. The Pass/Fail option is available. Students enrolled in this course may also qualify for articulated college credit as a result of the Districts partnership with McHenry County College (MCC). In order to qualify, a student must meet each of the requirements described on the form titled, Course Articulation Agreement. Qualifications include, but are not limited to successfully completion of both Keyboarding/Formatting I and Keyboarding/Formatting II by earning a C- or better, enrollment at MCC within 27 months upon graduation from high school, and completion of the Course Articulation Agreement. Students that meet these qualifications may receive 3 articulated credits for the MCC course titled, Document Formatting (AOM 102). Semesters: l Prerequisite: Keyboarding/Formatting I Level: 9, 10, 11, 12 Credit: l/2 Taxonomy: 469/470 Course Articulation Agreement Form is available at https://drive.google.com/a/d155.org/?tab=wo#folders/0BzqwdkoUMYvlZGVBY1JSNjh6UkE BUSINESS LAW This course gives an overview of the laws that affect business and society as a whole. What would you do if you were falsely accused of a crime? Is it legal for schools to censor student newspapers? Students have an opportunity to give their points of view and argue about the application of the law. Current topics regarding criminal law, civil law, contracts and ethics are discussed. At the conclusion of this course, there will be a mock trial where students perform the roles of lawyers, witnesses, judge and jury members. back to index 57 https://drive.google.com/a/d155.org/?tab=wo#folders/0BzqwdkoUMYvlZGVBY1JSNjh6UkEhttps://drive.google.com/a/d155.org/?tab=wo#folders/0BzqwdkoUMYvlZGVBY1JSNjh6UkEhttps://drive.google.com/a/d155.org/?tab=wo#folders/0BzqwdkoUMYvlZGVBY1JSNjh6UkEhttps://drive.google.com/a/d155.org/?tab=wo#folders/0BzqwdkoUMYvlZGVBY1JSNjh6UkEhttps://drive.google.com/a/d155.org/?tab=wo#folders/0BzqwdkoUMYvlZGVBY1JSNjh6UkEhttps://drive.google.com/a/d155.org/?tab=wo#folders/0BzqwdkoUMYvlZGVBY1JSNjh6UkE Semesters: 1 Prerequisite: None Level: 11, 12 and 10 with approval of division leader. Credit: l/2 Taxonomy: 475/476 CONSUMER EDUCATION This course meets the Consumer Education requirement for graduation. This course gives students an understanding of their role as consumers in our global economy. Students will learn how to make decisions, manage money, comparison shop, bank, budget, save and invest for their future needs and wants. Real world simulations are used in this project-based class. Duration: 9 weeks Prerequisite: None Level: 11, 12 Credit: 1/4 Taxonomy: 477/478 COMPUTER SKILLS This course meets the Computer requirement for graduation. This basic course introduces computers and demonstrates their usage in various settings such as school, home and business. Students learn how to use Microsoft Office 2007 software and create documents in word processing, spreadsheets, databases, presentations, web pages, and desktop publishing. The student will use simplified word processing software in order to produce simple records and letters, will demonstrate the general concepts of working with computers, and will learn to evaluate basic software and hardware. Semesters: 1 Prerequisite: None Level: 9, 10, 11, 12 Credit: 1/2 Taxonomy: 483/484 VIRTUAL ENTERPRISES INTERNATIONAL: ENTREPRENEURSHIP back to index 58 A capstone year long honors course developed by Virtual Enterprises International that offers an in-school entrepreneurship program and global business simulation that transforms students into business executives and classrooms into office settings. Open to students that have successfully completed at least two other business courses, VEI: Entrepreneurship empowers and motivates participants to develop a range of academic, business, technology and professional skills that prepares them for success in post-secondary education and employment (source: http://veinternational.org/about/). This course may be offered in limited capacity and therefore students in grade twelve may be given preference. Additional Information: Fees may not cover all expenses. Please contact the Career and Industry Division Leader at your school for details. Semesters: 2 Prerequisite: Students must have previously earned a minimum grade of C- or better in two different semester-long business education courses. Level: 11, 12 Credit: per semester Taxonomy: 473/474 BUSINESS INCUBATOR A capstone year-long honors course designed to get students excited about real-world entrepreneurship. Students will interact with business experts regularly as they research and develop their own products and companies. Students will learn about the lean business model, marketing, accounting, human resources and legal aspects associated with running a business. Similar to the popular television series, Shark Tank, students will present their business ideas to a panel of experts. This course is offered in limited capacity (currently at Prairie Ridge High School) and therefore students from other schools may need to travel to participate. In these instances, students are required to provide their own transportation. Semesters: 2 Prerequisite: Students must have previously earned a minimum grade of C- or better in one different semester-long business education courses or received the approval of the division leader. Level: 12 Credit: per semester Taxonomy: 471BI/472BI back to index 59 http://veinternational.org/about/http://veinternational.org/about/_______________________ CHILD DEVELOPMENT & THE FAMILY CHILD DEVELOPMENT back to index 60 This course emphasizes learning experience which help students gain knowledge and understanding of the intellectual, physical, social and emotional development of children from conception through three years. The course content centers around the following duty areas: managing and organizing child development by applying decision-making and goal-setting skills; promoting child development by applying physical, social, intellectual and emotional principles; practicing health and safety standards for children: providing experiences which encourage children to maximize resources; encouraging human relation skills in children; and evaluating family and career changes in relation to their impact on children. Information related to careers in child care is incorporated throughout the course. Students enrolled in this course may also qualify for articulated college credit as a result of the Districts partnership with McHenry County College (MCC). In order to qualify, a student must meet each of the requirements described on the form titled, Course Articulation Agreement. Qualifications include, but are not limited to successfully completion of courses Child Development and PreSchool Lab by earning a C- or better, enrollment at MCC within 27 months upon graduation from high school, and completion of the Course Articulation Agreement. Students that meet these qualifications may receive 3 articulated credits for the MCC course titled, Early Childhood (ECE 290). Semesters: l Prerequisite: None Level: 10, 11, 12 Credit: l/2 Taxonomy: 569 Course Articulation Agreement Form is available at https://drive.google.com/a/d155.org/?tab=wo#folders/0BzqwdkoUMYvlZGVBY1JSNjh6UkE back to index 61 https://drive.google.com/a/d155.org/?tab=wo#folders/0BzqwdkoUMYvlZGVBY1JSNjh6UkEhttps://drive.google.com/a/d155.org/?tab=wo#folders/0BzqwdkoUMYvlZGVBY1JSNjh6UkE PRESCHOOL LAB Students will have the opportunity to study and interact with children by conducting a preschool laboratory for three, four, and five year old children. They will apply their learning about children through participation in the preschool lab, observation of the children and the direction of planned activities which meet the needs of preschool children. Emphasis will be placed on learning about various types of child care programs along with the role of the child care provider. This course will be of value to the student desiring present or future employment in the field of child care as well as training in care and guidance of children in the home. Students enrolled in this course may also qualify for articulated college credit as a result of the Districts partnership with McHenry County College (MCC). In order to qualify, a student must meet each of the requirements described on the form titled, Course Articulation Agreement. Qualifications include, but are not limited to successfully completion of courses Child Development and PreSchool Lab by earning a C- or better, enrollment at MCC within 27 months upon graduation from high school, and completion of the Course Articulation Agreement. Students that meet these qualifications may receive 3 articulated credits for the MCC course titled, Early Childhood (ECE 290). back to index 62 Semesters: 1 Prerequisite: Child Development and instructor approval Level: 10, 11, 12 Credit: l/2 Periods: 7 per week Taxonomy: 572 Course Articulation Agreement Form is available at https://drive.google.com/a/d155.org/?tab=wo#folders/0BzqwdkoUMYvlZGVBY1JSNjh6UkE INTERNSHIP IN EDUCATION (formerly known as Seminar in Child Care) This individual advanced study course in child and day care services is designed to give students an opportunity to participate directly with professionals who work with children in settings such as preschools, day care centers, and elementary schools. Students will observe and experience first-hand the essential knowledge and skills required to be a successful educator. Examples of duties the students may perform include helping students in small groups, creating and teaching mini lessons, designing bulletin boards, and performing clerical work. The content includes: career education opportunities, planning for the future, job-seeking skills, personal development, human relationships, legal protection and responsibilities, economics and the job, and organizations. This course is highly recommended for students interested in careers involving children and education. Students must provide their own transportation. Semesters: 1 Prerequisite: Successful completion of Preschool Lab, Child Development and the approval of division leader. Level: 11, 12 Credit: 1/2 Taxonomy: 583/584 ADULT LIVING This course meets the Consumer Education requirement for graduation. The major goal of Adult Living is to help the student acquire a deeper understanding of his/her functioning role in society. Areas of emphasis will include: issues facing adolescents today; maturity, and character growth; personality development; stress and conflict management; decision-making and problem-solving; and cost comparison, budgeting, checking, and credit. In addition, this course encourages each student to back to index 63 https://drive.google.com/a/d155.org/?tab=wo#folders/0BzqwdkoUMYvlZGVBY1JSNjh6UkEhttps://drive.google.com/a/d155.org/?tab=wo#folders/0BzqwdkoUMYvlZGVBY1JSNjh6UkEdevelop a greater understanding of his/her relations with others and the realization of the value of effective communication in these relationships. The awareness of the factors involved in lasting male and female relationships and the positive aspects of human sexuality will be discussed. These issues will all be discussed within the context of the family. Semesters: 1 Prerequisite: None Level: 11, 12 Credit: l/2 Taxonomy: 575/576 ORIENTATION TO FAMILY AND CONSUMER SCIENCES This class will survey the areas of home economics related to foods, family, and self. It is designed so that the students will be introduced to concepts such as clothing and textiles, resource management, foods and nutrition, housing, furnishings, human development, interpersonal and family relationships, and the world of work. Students will be provided with information which can improve their quality of life and help them set realistic goals as a citizen, wage earner, individual, family member, and/or parent. This course serves the special needs population as an introduction to any of the classes in the family and consumer science sequence. Semesters: 1 Prerequisite: Instructor approval Level: 9, 10 Credit: 1/2 Taxonomy: 557/558 _______________________ back to index 64 CULINARY ARTS CULINARY ARTS I Have fun learning how to prepare and cook foods in a group setting. Lab and classroom experiences will be based on learning how to select, prepare, cook, and store various foods with guidance from a variety of quality resources including http://www.choosemyplate.gov/. Emphasis will be placed on meeting health, safety, and sanitation needs. Information pertaining to nutrition, dietary guidelines, and careers will also be included in the course. Students will learn the principles of baking and cooking with quick breads, grain products, fruits, vegetables, eggs, and dairy products. To wrap up the semester, the students will participate in a special project. Semesters: 1 Prerequisite: None Level: 9, 10, 11, 12 Credit: l/2 Periods: 5 per week Taxonomy: 559/560 CULINARY ARTS I COMMERCIAL This course takes place in a commercial kitchen and is a study of the principles of nutrition and food preparation including food service and meal management. Additional emphasis is placed on cooking principles, proper use and arrangement of equipment and measurements, which will be practiced by students in weekly cooking experiences. Students will earn the Food Handlers Certification upon completion of this course and passing of the state exam. This certification is required by law for all food handlers of any organization. Key areas of study include: basic food safety, personal hygiene, cross-contamination, time/temp, sanitation, etc. A $5 fee is associated with this course to cover the cost of the American Heart Association CPR/First-aid certification. An additional $10 fee is associated with this course to cover the state cost of the Food Handlers Exam and Certification. back to index 65 http://www.choosemyplate.gov/http://www.choosemyplate.gov/This course is offered in limited capacity (currently at Crystal Lake South High School) and therefore students from other schools may need to travel to participate. In these instances, students are required to provide their own transportation. Semesters: 1 Prerequisite: None Level: 9, 10, 11, 12 Credit: I/2 Periods: 5 per week Taxonomy: 559COM/560COM CULINARY ARTS II This course is designed to expand on the knowledge learned in Food and Nutrition I. Further emphasis will be placed on selecting, preparing, cooking, and preserving various foods. Lab and classroom experiences will emphasize healthy eating habits and emphasize information provided by http://www.choosemyplate.gov/. Principles associated with baking cookies, cakes, pastries, and yeast breads will be addressed. Students will also learn about cooking poultry, beef, pork, fish, shellfish, casseroles, soups, and prepare salads. Moreover, they will learn about herbs, spices, and garnishing techniques. The culminating activity will be a special project. Information related to careers in food and nutrition will be included in the course. Semesters: 1 Prerequisite: Culinary Arts I Level: 9, 10, 11, 12 Credit: l/2 Periods: 7 per week Taxonomy: 561/562 CULINARY ARTS II COMMERCIAL This course is takes place in a commercial kitchen and is designed to expand on the knowledge obtained from Culinary Arts I and II and/or Culinary Arts I Commercial. Students will earn the Illinois Department of Public Healths Food Service Sanitation Manager Certification upon completion of this course if they take and pass the state exam at the end of the semester. This course is designed to begin the professional culinary program that introduces high school students to careers in the restaurant and foodservice industry and teaches them the basic skills and knowledge they will need to achieve success. Higher level preparation techniques, skills, and terminology are covered and mastered with an emphasis on cutlery skills, meat preparation, and back to index 66 http://www.choosemyplate.gov/http://www.choosemyplate.gov/pastries. Students in this course will participate in creative preparation and presentation of a variety of food products. The program encourages high school students to experience all aspects of operating and managing a food service establishment, and helps students build good business and management skills. These skills are as vital to all other industries as they are to foodservice. Should students elect to take the Managers Certification exam, the cost of the exam is $75. This course is offered in limited capacity (currently at Crystal Lake South High School) and therefore students from other schools may need to travel to participate. In these instances, students are required to provide their own transportation. Semesters: 1 Prerequisite: Culinary Arts I and II OR Culinary Arts I Commercial Level: 9, 10, 11, 12 Credit: 1/2 Periods: 7 per week Taxonomy: 561COM/562COM ADVANCED CULINARY ARTS This course is designed to meet the needs of students interested in seeking a career in the food industry, including experiences associated with owning or operating a restaurant, catering business, or bakery. The students will gain insight into the responsibilities associated with being a chef at various levels. Lab experiences will include menu planning, meal preparation, and understanding the costs associated with the process. Semesters: 1 Prerequisite: Culinary Arts II Level: 10, 11, 12 Credit: 1/2 Periods: 7 per week Taxonomy: 565/566 ADVANCED CULINARY ARTS COMMERCIAL This course will offer students an in-depth cooking experience in a commercial kitchen. Cooking experiences will include, but are not limited to, regional and ethnic dishes, gourmet desserts, catering, and mock-restaurant experience. The program blends the latest FDA Food Code, food safety research and years of food sanitation training experience. Managers learn to implement essential food safety practices and create a back to index 67 culture of food safety. All content and materials are based on actual job tasks identified by foodservice industry experts. This course is offered in limited capacity (currently at Crystal Lake South High School) and therefore students from other schools may need to travel to participate. In these instances, students are required to provide their own transportation. Semesters: 1 Prerequisite: Successful completion of Culinary II Commercial with a C- or higher and a Food Handlers Certification Level: 10, 11, 12 Periods: 7 per week Taxonomy: 565COM/566COM INTERNSHIP IN FOOD SERVICES This course is designed to meet the individual needs of students interested in increasing their skills and knowledge in areas such as the restaurant hospitality industry, entrepreneurship opportunities and capabilities, catering, bakery, and fast food operations. Content includes: career education opportunities, planning for the future, jobseeking skills, personal development, human relationships, legal protection and responsibilities, economics and the job, organizations, and job termination. For junior and senior students in Foods and Nutrition, here is the opportunity to pursue a career in food service management. Semesters: 1 Prerequisites: Culinary Arts I & II, Advanced Culinary Arts and instructor approval. Credit: 1/2 per semester (may be repeated for additional credit) Level: 11, 12 Taxonomy: 567/568 NUTRITION AND WELLNESS This course studies the impact nutrition, ingredients and the manner in which foods are produced and prepared have on overall wellness. There will be an exploration of how health concerns have changed as a result of dietary trends, as students examine national and global issues including the patterns, causes and effects of disease in defined populations. Students will analyze a variety of nonfiction text including but not limited to both popular and scientific literature in a deep and critical manner. This course merges culinary, scientific, and sociological components in an effort to better back to index 68 understanding causes of compromised health and possible approaches in preventing and controlling health problems in order to improve overall wellness. Topics may include organics, gluten free, genetically engineered foods, food and waterborne disease, the effects of pesticides and toxins in our food supply, soil and water, as well as factors affecting good food choices, eating for sports performance, nutrition across the lifespan, and environmental health and policies. Semesters: 1 Prerequisite: none Credit: 1/2 Level: 10, 11, 12 Taxonomy: 565WEL/566WEL back to index 69 _______________________ EDUCATION FOR EMPLOYMENT All Education for Employment courses are open to both college and non-college bound students. Placement of students is based on academic background, student needs, and the recommendation of the coordinator. INTERRELATED OCCUPATIONS Students enrolled in this course during the second semester will meet the Consumer Education requirement for graduation. This cooperative education program is designed to provide students the skills needed to be successful in our rapidly changing global economy and workforce. Classroom topics include: job search skills (resumes, networking, interviewing techniques), career exploration, occupational survival skills (decision making, problem solving, goal setting, interpersonal) as well as money management skills. Students are released from school and receive credit for their on-the-job cooperative work experiences enabling them to apply the skills learned in class. They will work a minimum of fifteen hours per week. Semesters: 1-4 Prerequisite: Age 16; Related class meets 5 periods/week Level: 11, 12 Credit: Class and Job Taxonomy: 859/860 (REL) and 861/862 (JOB) ACHIEVE This education for employment course is designed to provide freshmen and sophomores an opportunity to achieve personally, academically and professionally. Classroom instruction focuses on skills such as: study skills, time management, back to index 70 interpersonal skills, and career exploration. By developing these skills and exploring careers it is hoped to spark the interest in students to stay in school and work toward meaningful goals. Semesters: 2 Prerequisite: Department Chair Level: 9, 10, 11, 12 Credit: 1/2 per Semester Taxonomy: 851/852 (REL) and 853/854 (JOB) S.E.C.V.E. (Special Education Cooperative Vocational Education) Students enrolled in this course during the third quarter will meet the Consumer Education requirement for graduation. This course is open only to Special Education students. It couples paid occupational experience on-the-job with an in-school related class designed to meet the special needs of students. Classroom instruction focuses on providing students with job success and career exploration skills related to the job and improving the abilities of the students to interact positively with others. Semesters: 1-4 Prerequisites: Age 16; Related class meets 5 periods/week Level: 11, 12 Credit: 1 per semester CAREER INTERNSHIP A semester course that provides students an opportunity to explore career interests. Students will develop desirable workplace skills, habits, and attitudes. This course consists of nine weeks of classroom instruction and nine weeks of on-site internship duties. Placements are contingent upon approved partnerships with local businesses and organizations and may include, but not be limited to automotives, business and finance, cosmetology, culinary arts, government and public relations, engineering, health and human services, information and computer technology, law, manufacturing, physical therapy, and veterinary medicine. Students are required to complete an application and successfully complete an interview. Some partnerships may not occur due to limited or unavailable placements. Students must provide their own transportation to and from the internship site. This course meets only during second semester. back to index 71 Semesters: 1 Prerequisite: Approval of the division leader and successful completion of other required steps indicated in the description. Level: 12 Credit: per semester Taxonomy: 491/492 back to index 72 _______________________ FASHION & DESIGN FASHION OPPORTUNITIES I Designed to introduce the student to the fashion world, this course provides students opportunities to develop knowledge and understanding of textiles, fashions and fabrics and to assist them in meeting the clothing and fabric product needs of themselves, families and/or general public. Information and experiences providing students with an understanding of the psychological aspects of fabric products as related to the needs of people, and the jobs and careers using competencies related to textiles and fabrics are included throughout the course. Development of skills necessary for decisions related to personal image and clothing, and textiles will be stressed. Students will study trends in fashions and career opportunities. Ready-to-wear clothes, as well as clothing constructed by the student, will be used as a basis for learning about clothing, fabric care, and sewing skills. The student will be introduced to the elements of fashion, principles of design, and visual display. Semesters: 1 Prerequisite: None Level: 9, 10, 11, 12 Credit: 1/2 Taxonomy: 551/552 FASHION OPPORTUNITIES II This course expands on skills and content learned in Fashion Opportunities I. It is devoted to increasing the level of knowledge and skills of students as they construct, purchase, care for, and work with clothing, textiles, and accessories. Additionally, the back to index 73 ways in which personal and fashion aspects interact with the market will be explored. Broad areas of emphasis for this course include color, line and design in fashion, fibers and fabrics, clothing selection based on needs, sewing and other construction skills, clothing maintenance and care, merchandising clothing, career opportunities in clothing, accessories, and textile product fields, and occupational emphasis in the fashion industry. Semesters: 1 Prerequisite: Fashion Opportunities I Level 9, 10, 11, 12 Credit: 1/2 Taxonomy: 553/5554 FASHION MERCHANDISING This course offers a planned sequence of learning experiences which provide the student with the opportunities to develop the competencies needed for employment in a variety of fashion and apparel-related occupations. The emphasis is on performing sales related activities, preparing displays, performing merchandising activities, buying in the retail market and garment construction. Semesters: 1 Prerequisites: Fashion Opportunities I and II and instructor approval Level: 10, 11, 12 Credit: 1/2 (may be repeated once for additional credit) Taxonomy: 555/556 HOUSING AND INTERIOR DESIGN This one semester course is designed to provide the student with a variety of hands-on experiences in planning and design of residential interiors. This course explores the current trends in the design profession and provides learning experiences that include an introduction to housing styles, floor plan design, color theory, and elements and principles of design. Additional units of study include the selection of background materials, kitchen and bath planning, furniture styles and arrangement, and choosing lighting and accessories. Each student will create and present a culminating design project based on the design principles learned throughout the semester. Semesters: 1 Prerequisite: None Level: 9, 10, 11, 12 back to index 74 Credit: l/2 Taxonomy: 573/574 INTERNSHIP IN HOUSING AND INTERIOR DESIGN An individual study course, this course is designed to meet the individual needs of students interested in increasing their skills and knowledge in the following areas: housing styles and architecture, designing functional interior environments, floor plan drawing, design presentation and implementation, career opportunities, job-seeking skills, personal development, human relationships, economics and the job, organizations, and job termination. Hands-on lab experiences provide opportunities for students to gain additional skills necessary for entry level employment in the housing and interior design field or possibly further study at the post-secondary level. A contract between the instructor and student spelling out objectives of the course will be kept on file. Semesters: 1 Prerequisite: Housing and Interior Design and instructor approval Credit: (may be repeated for additional credit) Level: 10, 11, 12 Taxonomy: 587/588 INTERNSHIP IN FASHION MERCHANDISING AND APPAREL An individual advanced study course, this course is designed to meet the individual needs of students interested in increasing their skills and knowledge in the following areas: fashion merchandising, retailing or interior design, career opportunities, jobseeking skills, personal development, human relationships, legal protection and responsibilities, economics and the job, organizations, and job termination. Advanced, hands-on lab experiences provide opportunities for students to gain additional skills necessary for entry level employment in the fashion merchandising field or advanced study at the postsecondary level. A contract between the instructor and student spelling out objectives of the course will be kept on file. Semesters: 1-4 Prerequisite: Fashion or Interior Design and instructor approval Credit: 1/2 (may be repeated for additional credit) Level: 11,12 Taxonomy: 577/578 back to index 75 _______________________ INDUSTRIAL TECHNOLOGY ORIENTATION TO INDUSTRIAL TECHNOLOGY This course is designed to introduce students to the various areas in industrial technology. The course includes, but is not limited to the concepts from small engines, woods, metals, drafting/design, and electronics. Exposure to the technologies associated with these courses will provide orientation, background and experience needed to pursue skilllevel industrial technology programs. Semesters: 2, but a 1 semester option is available at some sites. Prerequisite: None Level: 9, 10 Credit: 1/2 per semester Taxonomy: 501/502 INTRODUCTION TO TECHNICAL DESIGN AND DRAFTING (Drafting I) This introductory course in technical drawing is designed primarily for the student with no previous drafting experience. A beginning course in mechanical and architectural drafting utilizing primarily computer aided drafting software in which the student will study the need and use of drafting in industry. Students will learn to make simple sketches and drawings involving the use of shape description, size description, back to index 76 geometric construction, orthographic projection, pictorial drawing, and simple auxiliaries. Career opportunities in the drafting industry will be explored. Students enrolled in this course may also qualify for articulated college credit as a result of the Districts partnership with McHenry County College (MCC). In order to qualify, a student must meet each of the requirements described on the form titled, Course Articulation Agreement. Qualifications include, but are not limited to successfully completion of Introduction to Technical Design and Drafting (Drafting I) and Technical Design and Drafting (Drafting II) by earning a C- or better, enrollment at MCC within 27 months upon graduation from high school, and completion of the Course Articulation Agreement. Students that meet these qualifications may receive 3 articulated credits for the MCC course titled, 2D Computer Aided Design Graphics I (AET 151). Semesters: 1 Prerequisite: None Level: 9, 10, 11, 12 Credit: 1/2 Taxonomy: 503 Course Articulation Agreement Form is available at https://drive.google.com/a/d155.org/?tab=wo#folders/0BzqwdkoUMYvlZGVBY1JSNjh6UkE TECHNICAL DESIGN AND DRAFTING (Drafting II) This course is a continuation of Introduction to Technical Design and Drafting. Students will continue their work on sketches and drawings involving the use of shape description, size description, geometric construction, pictorial drawing, and simple auxiliaries. In addition, students will be exposed to simple reverse engineering concepts and assignments. Students enrolled in this course may also qualify for articulated college credit as a result of the Districts partnership with McHenry County College (MCC). In order to qualify, a student must meet each of the requirements described on the form titled, Course Articulation Agreement. Qualifications include, but are not limited to successfully back to index 77 https://drive.google.com/a/d155.org/?tab=wo#folders/0BzqwdkoUMYvlZGVBY1JSNjh6UkEhttps://drive.google.com/a/d155.org/?tab=wo#folders/0BzqwdkoUMYvlZGVBY1JSNjh6UkEhttps://drive.google.com/a/d155.org/?tab=wo#folders/0BzqwdkoUMYvlZGVBY1JSNjh6UkEcompletion of Introduction to Technical Design and Drafting (Drafting I) and Technical Design and Drafting (Drafting II) by earning a C- or better, enrollment at MCC within 27 months upon graduation from high school, and completion of the Course Articulation Agreement. Students that meet these qualifications may receive 3 articulated credits for the MCC course titled, 2D Computer Aided Design Graphics I (AET 151). Semesters: 1 Prerequisite: Introduction to Technical Design and Drafting Level: 9, 10, 11, 12 Credit: 1/2 Taxonomy: 504 Course Articulation Agreement Form is available at https://drive.google.com/a/d155.org/?tab=wo#folders/0BzqwdkoUMYvlZGVBY1JSNjh6UkE MECHANICAL ENGINEERING AND DESIGN (Drafting Occupations I) This course is designed to give the student a broader knowledge of the field of mechanical drafting. It will cover orthographic projection, schematic drawing, blueprinting, working drawings, and assembly drawings. This course provides learning experiences related to the principles, tools, materials, techniques, equipment, and processes utilized in the production and reproduction of drawings, layouts, plans and blueprints. Emphasis will be placed on threedimensional representation using the computer as a drafting tool. Instruction is provided in freehand sketching, theory of projection, relationship of coordinate planes, object position in relation to planes, projection of straight and curved lines and surfaces, standards and requirements of dimensioning and tolerancing, isometrics of planes and solids, cavalier, cabinet, and general oblique drawing, diametric drawing, picture planes, points of sight, visual rays, and vanishing points in perspective drawing. Semesters: 2 Prerequisite: Successful completion of Introduction to Technical Design and Drafting, as well as Technical Design and Drafting Level: 10, 11, 12 Credit: 1/2 per semester Taxonomy: 505/506 ADVANCED MECHANICAL ENGINEERING AND DESIGN (Drafting Occupations II) back to index 78 https://drive.google.com/a/d155.org/?tab=wo#folders/0BzqwdkoUMYvlZGVBY1JSNjh6UkEhttps://drive.google.com/a/d155.org/?tab=wo#folders/0BzqwdkoUMYvlZGVBY1JSNjh6UkEhttps://drive.google.com/a/d155.org/?tab=wo#folders/0BzqwdkoUMYvlZGVBY1JSNjh6UkEThis course shall offer to the students an opportunity to learn the techniques, principles, and related knowledge of industrial machine drafting. The students who undertake to solve these problems and learn these techniques will have a more realistic outlook into either the drafting or engineering field as a vocation. Occupational opportunities include engineers, designers, layout patternmakers, draftspersons, etc. This course is designed for the serious student. It provides the background for entry into engineering or architectural drawing on the college level. The course content includes floor plans, sectional view, elevation views, and kitchen layout. Also emphasized are engineering drawing concepts. The following topics will be included: advanced multi-view, sectional and pictorial drawings, inking (both lettering and line drawings), developments, production dimensioning, welding symbols, metric drawings, and others. Many of these drawings will be completed with our CAD (Computer Aided Drafting) System. Semesters: 2 Prerequisite: Successful completion of Mechanical Engineering and Design. Periods: 10 periods per week Level: 11, 12 Credit: 1/2 per semester Taxonomy: 507/508 ARCHITECTURAL ENGINEERING AND DESIGN (Architectural Drafting I-II) This course is designed to help the student gain an understanding of how architectural plans are developed and drawn. Emphasis is placed on the development of the plans. Each student shall develop a complete set of architectural plans and blueprints. The student will be involved in the following areas of architecture: different types of design, history, drawing a floor plan, elevations, wall sections, electrical, and foundation plans. Semesters: 2 Prerequisite: none Level: 10, 11, 12 Credit: 1/2 per semester Taxonomy: 509/510 WOODS I A semester course devoted to learning the fundamental skills and knowledge in the use of hand and power woodworking tools, to use common materials employed in woodworking, and to learn safe and efficient work habits while constructing student projects. back to index 79 Semesters: l Prerequisite: None Level: 9, 10, 11, 12 Credit: l/2 Taxonomy: 513/514 WOODS II A course to provide the student with an opportunity to develop more skill in the use of tools, materials and processes in constructing projects involving planning, use of hand and power tools, and to introduce the basic operations on machines. Semesters: l Prerequisite: Woods I Level: 9, 10, 11, 12 Credit: l/2 Taxonomy: 515/516 WOODS III This course is designed for students who want to study advanced Woodworking that could lead to gainful employment. The important and more common operations of power tools such as the circular saw, saber saw, jig saw, jointer, planer, drill press, sander, wood lathe, router and router attachments are thoroughly dealt with, stressing safety for their uses. Semesters: 1 Prerequisite: Woods I & II or approval of staff Level: 11, 12 Credit: l/2 per semester Taxonomy: 517/518 METALS I An introductory course in metal work for the student who is interested in bench metal, sheet metal, ornamental metal, forging, heat treating, foundry, cutting, finishing, beginning welding and lathe. Where appropriate, students will be introduced to power machinery such as the milling machine and lathe. Safe and proper use of all equipment will be stressed and reinforced during related project work and lab exercises. Semesters: 1 back to index 80 Prerequisite: None Level: 9, 10, 11, 12 Credit: l/2 Taxonomy: 520/521 METALS II This is the second course in metal work. It is designed to expose the student to additional metalworking processes introduced in the beginning class, but major emphasis will be placed on learning to use machine tools. These include the lathe, milling machine, vertical and horizontal band saws and grinders. The welding of metal may also be introduced. The skill and knowledge one must have to work safely in these areas are highly stressed. Projects will be made to implement this technical material. Semesters: 1 Prerequisite: Metals I Level: 9, 10, 11, 12 Credit: l/2 Taxonomy: 521/522 METALS III (Manufacturing Occupations I) This is a trade preparatory program for students who plan to enter the machine or allied trades. Course content will emphasize applying safety practices, selecting materials, performing bench work operations, performing precision measurement, performing layouts, performing housekeeping and record keeping activities and operating a variety of tools used for separating, forming and combining material. After completing the program, students should be qualified to enter industry with an understanding of fundamental machine shop operations and procedures. The program does not attempt to make journeymen machinists, but to teach the students fundamental skills necessary to enter the trade, and to give them a background in related and technical information pertinent to the machinist trade. Two periods each day will be devoted to practical work on a useful and productive basis; also, time is devoted to instruction in the necessary and related subjects. The course consists of the following basic areas of machine shop work. (l) Bench and drill press work; (2) lathe work; (3) shaper work; (4) milling machine work; (5) grinding work; (6) power saw work; (7) heat treating and forging; (8) arc and gas welding; (9) sheet metal; (10) tool sharpening; (11) blueprint reading. back to index 81 Semesters: 1 Prerequisite: Metals I & II or approval of instructor Level: 11, 12 5 periods per week Credit: l/2 per semester Taxonomy: 523/524 ROBOTICS & DRONE TECHNOLOGY Students will develop skills in mechanical design, digital electronics, coding, and fabrication as they work in teams to build simple and complex robotics and drone devices. Students will explore usage of robotics and drone technologies in modern business and industry, examine how these devices are affecting our lives and shaping our culture, and the career possibilities of those with knowledge of robotics and drone technology. This course is offered in limited capacity (currently at Crystal Lake Central and Prairie Ridge) and therefore students from other schools may need to travel to participate. In these instances, students are required to provide their own transportation. Semesters: 1 Prerequisite: None Level: 9, 10, 11, 12 Periods: 5 per week Credit: 1/2 Taxonomy: 525RD/526RD ELECTRONICS I (Electricity/Electronics I) This is a course designed for those interested in basic introduction to the field of electricity and electronics. The scope of the course will include use of meters, direct current circuits, application of Ohms law, magnetism, safety and introduction to alternating current theory. Experiments will be performed using the principles learned in the course. Semesters: 1 Prerequisite: None Level: 9, 10, 11, 12 Credit l/2 Taxonomy: 525/526 back to index 82 ELECTRONICS II (Electricity/Electronics II) This course is designed to give a further exposure to the field of electronics and will cover the following areas: the use of test equipment; oscilloscopes, operation and application of active devices such as diodes, transistors, and integrated circuits; alternating current theory; inductors and capacitors as applied to alternating current circuits; radio circuits and occupational information. Experiments will be performed using principles learned in the course. Semesters: 1 Prerequisite: Electronics I or approval of staff Level: 9, 10, 11, 12 Credit: l/2 Taxonomy: 527/528 SMALL ENGINES (Power Mech. I) This is designed as a beginning course for the study of internal combustion engines as major sources of power. Laboratory experiences will be provided on the proper disassembly techniques used on two and four cycle engines, basic vocabulary, concepts, attitudes and mechanical skills. Cooperative work habits, safety and proper usage of common hand tools will be stressed in the laboratory. Semesters: 1 Prerequisite: None Level: 9, 10, 11, 12 Credit: l/2 Taxonomy: 533/534 AUTO I (Auto Mechanics) Designed as a more comprehensive study of the internal combustion engine and its related parts. Emphasis will be placed on learning the basic principle function of the automotive engine, electrical and fuel systems. Students will develop problem solving abilities and are required to disassemble and assemble assigned units of study. Students enrolled in this course may also qualify for articulated college credit as a result of the Districts partnership with McHenry County College (MCC). In order to qualify, a student must meet each of the requirements described on the form titled, Course Articulation Agreement. Qualifications include, but are not limited to successfully completion of Auto I and Auto II by earning a C- or better, enrollment at MCC within 27 months upon graduation from high school, and completion of the Course Articulation back to index 83 Agreement. Students that meet these qualifications may receive 4 articulated credits for the MCC course titled, Principles of Automotive Technology (AMT 100). Semesters: 1 Prerequisite: Small Engines Level: 10, 11, 12 7 periods per week Credit: l/2 Taxonomy: 535/536 Course Articulation Agreement Form is available at https://drive.google.com/a/d155.org/?tab=wo#folders/0BzqwdkoUMYvlZGVBY1JSNjh6UkE AUTO II (Auto Service Occupations I) This is a vocational trade preparatory in-school course designed for students who are planning to enter the auto mechanics or allied fields for gainful employment. The students will learn the tools of the trade, personal benefits, problems of the trade, power transmission systems, and basic diagnostic skills necessary for this occupational field. Two periods each day will be devoted to practical work on cars in our auto mechanics shop doing operations that include tune-ups, engine replacements, fuel systems, electrical systems, engine testing, cooling systems, brakes, steering, etc. Students enrolled in this course may also qualify for articulated college credit as a result of the Districts partnership with McHenry County College (MCC). In order to qualify, a student must meet each of the requirements described on the form titled, Course Articulation Agreement. Qualifications include, but are not limited to successfully completion of Auto I and Auto II by earning a C- or better, enrollment at MCC within 27 months upon graduation from high school, and completion of the Course Articulation Agreement. Students that meet these qualifications may receive 4 articulated credits for the MCC course titled, Principles of Automotive Technology (AMT 100). This course is offered in limited capacity and therefore students may need to travel to another school to participate. In these instances, students are required to provide their own transportation. Course Articulation Agreement Form is available at https://drive.google.com/a/d155.org/?tab=wo#folders/0BzqwdkoUMYvlZGVBY1JSNjh6UkE back to index 84 https://drive.google.com/a/d155.org/?tab=wo#folders/0BzqwdkoUMYvlZGVBY1JSNjh6UkEhttps://drive.google.com/a/d155.org/?tab=wo#folders/0BzqwdkoUMYvlZGVBY1JSNjh6UkEhttps://drive.google.com/a/d155.org/?tab=wo#folders/0BzqwdkoUMYvlZGVBY1JSNjh6UkEhttps://drive.google.com/a/d155.org/?tab=wo#folders/0BzqwdkoUMYvlZGVBY1JSNjh6UkEhttps://drive.google.com/a/d155.org/?tab=wo#folders/0BzqwdkoUMYvlZGVBY1JSNjh6UkEhttps://drive.google.com/a/d155.org/?tab=wo#folders/0BzqwdkoUMYvlZGVBY1JSNjh6UkECary-Grove High School students in grades 11 and 12 will participate in this course for dual credit in partnership with McHenry County College (MCC). This opportunity is possible based upon a variety of reasons, including but not limited to the Cary-Grove high school teacher meeting special instructor requirements mandated by MCC. Students are required to complete the MCC High School Plus Registration Form in order to participate in this course. They may access this online document by contacting Dr. Hank Harvey, Cary-Grove High School Student Services Coordinator. In some instances, students may also be required to purchase an additional textbook, workbook or other related course material (required by MCC) as a result of this partnership. In the event that an 11th or 12th grader enrolled at another CHSD 155 high school would like to take this course for dual credit at Cary-Grove High School, then he/she may do so as long as they provide their own transportation. CHSD 155 does not guarantee every post high school institution will accept the MCC credits, so parents and students are encouraged to communicate with the admissions officer at the college or university of interest regarding this matter. The grading scale at MCC is different than CHSD 155. MCC does not award letter grades with pluses or minuses which is different than the grading system in CHSD 155. For instance, a B+ earned in CHSD 155 is a B at MCC. As a result, it is possible that the grades reported on the MCC and CHSD 155 report cards and transcripts vary. Students will receive an additional report card from MCC including grade(s) and course credit information. Semesters: 2 Prerequisite: Small Engines, Auto I or approval of staff Level: 11, 12 10 periods per week Credit: l/2 per semester Taxonomy: 537/538 Dual Credit Taxonomy: 537DC/538DC SEMINAR IN INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION This is an individual study course designed for students who wish to do advanced study in auto, drafting, metals, or woods. Advanced lab experiences provide opportunities for students to gain additional skills necessary for entry level employment in the Automotive Industry or advanced study at the postsecondary level. A contract between the instructor and student spelling out objectives of the course will be kept on file. Course back to index 85 http://ww2.d155.org/cg/StudentServices2/default.aspxcontent will provide opportunities for students to gain additional skills necessary for entry level employment or advanced study at the postsecondary level. Semesters: 1-2 Prerequisite: Approval of division leader Level: 11, 12 10 Periods per week Credit: 1/2 per semester Taxonomy: 503/504 TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION I (Orientation to Ind. Occ. I-II) This course meets the Computer requirement for graduation. This course is designed to give students a broad based knowledge of the world of technology. The curriculum is outcome based, self-directed, and includes hands-on experience. The student will interact with some of the following technologies: computer graphics, robotics, fiber/laser optics, aerodynamics, computer-aided design and manufacturing, plastics. Communications include: design, drafting, and graphic arts. Semesters: 1 Prerequisite: None Level: 10, 11, 12 Credit: 1/2 Taxonomy: 541/542 TECHNOLOGY II (Orientation to Ind. Occ. I-II) This course offers advanced work in the technologies of Technology I with an emphasis on problem solving. Semesters: 1 Prerequisite: B or above in Tech I Level: 10, 11, 12 Credit: 1/2 Taxonomy: 543/544 back to index 86 STUDENT TECHNICAL CENTER Student Technical Center (STC) is a computer technical support program. The purpose of the program is to create a student-run help desk that equips students to provide first-line technical support to students and staff. Students in the program will also participate in an independent study curriculum and have the opportunity to gain valuable industry certifications. Students will develop soft skills necessary for computer careers. While not a traditional class, students will be supervised by our staff and receive academic credit. The course is offered pass/fail; letter grades are not awarded. Semesters: 1 Prerequisite: None Level: 9, 10, 11, 12 Credit: 1/4 Taxonomy: 484STC INTRODUCTION TO ENGINEERING DESIGN (IED) - HONORS This course meets the computer requirement for graduation. A year long honors course, developed by Project Lead the Way, that teaches problem-solving skills using a design development process as it relates to the engineering field. Models of product solutions are created, analyzed and communicated using parametric solid modeling design software. Students that successfully complete this course and meet the score criteria on the PLTW exam may be eligible to earn college credit. Additional fees may be required as part of this process. Please see your PLTW teacher and department chairperson for details. Please visit http://www.pltwiowa.org/index.php?College-Credit-Assessment-Information-about-PLTW-College-Credit-82 to learn more about acquiring college credit from the University of Iowa based upon successful completion of this course, as well as earning a stanine score of 6-9 on the PLTW End of Course Assessment exam. Semesters: 2 Prerequisite: Department approval (for all grade levels). Students in grade 9 must have also successfully completed 8th grade Algebra and earned a minimum of a 17 on the EXPLORE math test. Level: 9, 10, 11, 12 Credit: 1/2 per semester Taxonomy: 493H/494H back to index 87 http://www.pltwiowa.org/index.php?College-Credit-Assessment-Information-about-PLTW-College-Credit-82http://www.pltwiowa.org/index.php?College-Credit-Assessment-Information-about-PLTW-College-Credit-82 PRINCIPLES OF ENGINEERING (POE) - HONORS A year long honors course, developed by Project Lead the Way that allows students an opportunity to explore technology systems and manufacturing processes. Students will also address the social and political consequences of technological change. Students that successfully complete this course and meet the score criteria on the PLTW exam may be eligible to earn college credit. Additional fees may be required as part of this process. Please see your PLTW teacher and department chairperson for details. Please visit http://www.pltwiowa.org/index.php?College-Credit-Assessment-Information-about-PLTW-College-Credit-82 to learn more about acquiring college credit from the University of Iowa based upon successful completion of this course, as well as earning a stanine score of 6-9 on the PLTW End of Course Assessment exam. Semesters: 2 Prerequisites: Students in grade 10 must have successfully completed Introduction to Engineering (IED). Students in grades 11 and 12 that have not participated in PLTW coursework before must seek department approval. Level: 10, 11, 12 Credit: 1/2 per semester Taxonomy: 495H/496H DIGITAL ELECTRONICS (DE) - HONORS A year long honors course developed by Project Lead the Way that allows students an opportunity to learn electronic circuitry. Students will be provided opportunities to construct and test for functionality. Students that successfully complete this course and meet the score criteria on the PLTW exam may be eligible to earn college credit. Additional fees may be required as part of this process. Please see your PLTW teacher and department chairperson for details. Please visit http://www.pltwiowa.org/index.php?College-Credit-Assessment-Information-about-PLTW-College-Credit-82 to learn more about acquiring college credit from the University of Iowa based upon successful completion of this course, as well as earning a stanine score of 6-9 on the PLTW End of Course Assessment exam. Semesters: 2 back to index 88 http://www.pltwiowa.org/index.php?College-Credit-Assessment-Information-about-PLTW-College-Credit-82http://www.pltwiowa.org/index.php?College-Credit-Assessment-Information-about-PLTW-College-Credit-82http://www.pltwiowa.org/index.php?College-Credit-Assessment-Information-about-PLTW-College-Credit-82http://www.pltwiowa.org/index.php?College-Credit-Assessment-Information-about-PLTW-College-Credit-82http://www.pltwiowa.org/index.php?College-Credit-Assessment-Information-about-PLTW-College-Credit-82http://www.pltwiowa.org/index.php?College-Credit-Assessment-Information-about-PLTW-College-Credit-82Prerequisites: Students in grade 10 must have successfully completed IED or POE. Students in grades 11 and 12 that have not participated in PLTW coursework before must seek department approval. Level: 10, 11, 12 Credit: 1/2 per semester Taxonomy: 497H/498H ENGINEERING DESIGN AND DEVELOPMENT (EDD) - HONORS A capstone year long honors course developed by Project Lead the Way, in which students work in teams to research, design, test and construct a solution to an open-ended engineering problem. The product development life cycle and a design process are used to guide and help the team to reach a solution to the problem. The team presents and defends their solution to a panel of outside reviewers at the conclusion of the course. The EDD course allows students to apply all the skills and knowledge learned in previous Project Lead the Way courses. Students that successfully complete this course and meet the score criteria on the PLTW exam may be eligible to earn college credit. Additional fees may be required as part of this process. Please see your PLTW teacher and department chairperson for details. This course is offered in limited capacity and therefore students may need to travel to another school to participate. In these instances, students are required to provide their own transportation. Semesters: 2 Prerequisites: Successful completion of two foundation PLTW courses including IED, POE, or DE. Level: 12 Credit: 1/2 per semester Taxonomy: 499H/500H FAA PRIVATE PILOT GROUND SCHOOL For those that dream to fly, the first step in bringing that dream to reality is learning foundational aviation knowledge. This can be obtained by attending the Private Pilot Ground School program where students will learn the fundamentals of airmanship that will provide a head start in the flight training required for a private pilot's license. The main goal of this course is to provide students with the information necessary to pass the Private Pilot Written Knowledge Test. This is accomplished by sharing the experiences and knowledge that the instructor and invited speakers have acquired over decades of flying experience. This course is designed so students can take part in and work towards flight training in the most fun and efficient way possible. back to index 89 Semesters: 1 Prerequisites: None Level: 9, 10, 11, 12 Credit: 1/2 Pass/Fail Taxonomy: 599/600 Additional Information: The course is offered as an evening class that meets for 3 hours, once a week at Crystal Lake South High School. Students are responsible for their own transportation to and from the school. There are costs associated with this course. AP COMPUTER SCIENCE PRINCIPLES This course meets the Computer requirement for graduation. AP Computer Science Principles is a new course offered by the College Board that will be made available to school districts for implementation during the 2016-17 school year. The College Board website describes the course as introducing students to the foundational concepts of computer science and challenges them to explore how computing and technology can impact the world. With a unique focus on creative problem solving and real-world applications, AP Computer Science Principles prepares students for college and career. Moreover, Rather than teaching a particular programming language or tool, the course focuses on using technology and programming as a means to solve computational problems and create exciting and personally relevant artifacts. This year long course focuses on seven big ideas; creativity, abstraction, data and information, algorithms, programming, the internet, and global impact. Students that are motivated, collaborative, creative, interested in solving problems, enjoy computers and demonstrate critical thinking skills are encouraged to participate. Students will prepare for the AP Computer Science Principles exam which will be a multiple-choice, paper and pencil exam, as well as the two AP through-course performance based assessments which require students to explore the impacts of computing and create computational artifacts through programming. Students enrolled in this course are encouraged to take the AP exam; however, the fees associated with this course do not include the cost of the AP exam. Please visit https://apstudent.collegeboard.org/exploreap to learn more about Advanced Placement and to access student friendly resources. If you are interested in the Advanced Placement credit policy at a particular university, then please visit https://apstudent.collegeboard.org/creditandplacement/search-credit-policies Semesters: 2 back to index 90 https://apstudent.collegeboard.org/exploreaphttps://apstudent.collegeboard.org/exploreaphttps://apstudent.collegeboard.org/creditandplacement/search-credit-policieshttps://apstudent.collegeboard.org/creditandplacement/search-credit-policiesPrerequisite: Approval of Industry and Careers division leader. Due to the rigorous nature of the course, emphasis on math and analytical skills, students should have successfully completed at least one year of Algebra I. Level: 9, 10, 11, 12 Taxonomy: 387CSP/388CSP Additional Information: This is an elective course. However, successful completion of this course may count towards the mathematics graduation requirement if the student has earned 2.0 credits in other math coursework; of which a 1.0 must be Algebra II. The credit earned in AP Computer Science Principles may not count as both an elective and math credit. back to index 91 _______________________ INTERNATIONAL STUDIES back to index 92 _______________________ SOCIAL SCIENCE COURSE SEQUENCE All students are required to successfully complete two semesters (1 credit) of coursework during the freshmen/sophomore block and two semesters (1 credit) of American History in the junior/senior block. back to index 93 Basic Level SOCIAL SCIENCE I As a result of taking this course students will understand the concepts of human and physical geography including the topics of regions, cultures, and the impact technology has had in shaping our world. Placement is only available through staff conference recommendation. Semesters: 2 Prerequisite: Teacher recommendation is required. Level: 9, 10 Credit: l/2 per semester Taxonomy: 029/030 SOCIAL SCIENCE II This course continues studies addressed in Social Science I and it is designed to present a basic understanding of government, geography, psychology or social concerns. It allows students to explore these areas through lecture, discussion, and individual projects. Placement is only available through staff conference recommendation. Semesters: 2 Prerequisite: Successful completion of Social Science I and teacher recommendation. Level: 9, 10 Credit: 1/2 per semester Taxonomy: 031/032 AMERICAN HISTORY This course meets the American History graduation requirement. This course is designed as a survey of our nations history. It begins with the early explorations and continues into the present time. The state requirement for passing the Illinois and United States Constitution tests is accomplished in this course. A passing grade in both semesters of this course is required for graduation. Placement is only available through staff conference recommendation. Semesters: 2 Prerequisite: Teacher recommendation is required. back to index 94 Level: 11, 12 Credit: l/2 per semester Taxonomy: 041/042 General Level WORLD STUDIES I & II This course meets the state civics requirement World Studies I & II are designed to prepare students in 9th and 10th grades to be critical consumers of information related to diverse global cultures and issues. Students will develop historical and social science critical reading and thinking skills through the use of primary and secondary source documents in order to develop and defend logical and informed interpretations about enduring thematic understandings. Course experiences will also prepare students to become more knowledgeable and active citizens. Finally, these courses will challenge students to develop skills reflective of a variety of college and career readiness standards, as well as prepare them to successfully complete more advanced social science coursework later in high school. The honors level sequence will accomplish this at a more accelerated rate because it introduces skill sets associated with Advanced Placement Coursework. Semesters: 2 Prerequisite: Successful completion of level I of World Studies before enrolling in level II unless special permission is granted due to scheduling conflicts and/or a need to repeat the course. Students not originally placed at the honors level, may transition from general to honors by (1) following the districts course transfer guidelines and procedures, (2) experiencing academic success in the current coursework, (3) receiving recommendation from the instructor and (4) approval of the division leader. Level: 9, 10 Credit: per semester Taxonomy: 237/238 UNITED STATES HISTORY This course meets the American History graduation requirement. This course is a survey of our nation's history. Semester one begins with Colonial America and will include the Civil War. Semester two begins with Imperialism and continues into the 20th century, including the Cold War. Throughout the course back to index 95 emphasis is placed on relating what is learned with the present. Primary goals include an appreciation of our nation's heritage, an understanding of our system of government, and a knowledge of our country's changing role in a changing world. Emphasis is also placed on developing a sense of historical perspective. In the first semester of this course the State requirement for passing the Illinois and United States constitution tests is met. Semesters: 2 Prerequisite: Level: 11, 12 Credit: l/2 per semester Taxonomy: 213/214 CURRENT ISSUES IN DEMOCRACY The objective of this course is to stimulate the students' interest and understanding of the American way of life. It is intended that students realize not only the advantages of a democratic society, but also become aware of the difficulties and dangers of this form of government. Emphasis is given to the view that intelligent people in a democracy differ on the solutions to problems, but it is the obligation of citizens to get the facts and make up their own mind. Lastly, students will recognize that decisions made in our society are made from knowledge of our past history. Some of the units covered are: elections, comparative governments, poverty and current economic problems. Semesters: 1 Prerequisite: Level: 11, 12 Credit: 1/2 Taxonomy: 215/216 LAW IN AMERICAN SOCIETY Street Law concentrates on providing students with both theoretical and practical applications of law in American society. It is designed to alert students of potential legal problems and liability and when possible provide a basis for self help. Units will include but not be limited to such topics as: court organization, criminal law, and civil law. Semesters: 1 Prerequisite: Level: 11, 12 Credit: 1/2 back to index 96 Taxonomy: 217/218 SOCIOLOGY Sociology offers a way of looking at social life. It is devoted to giving students a set of concepts which will help to better understand their own behavior and that of others. The course examines the influence of the geographical, biological, and social factors upon human behavior. The nature of the culture is analyzed and emphasis is placed upon the great part played by the cultural factor in shaping both personal life and forms of social relations. Other topics include groups, deviance, and the family. Semesters: 1 Prerequisite: Level: 11, 12 Credit: 1/2 Taxonomy: 221/222 ANTHROPOLOGY Anthropology is the study of humans. It examines humans both as a creature of the environment and as a creature of culture. This course studies scientific generalizations concerning why humans act as they do. The science of archaeology is studied with practical application where feasible. Emphasis is placed on comparing cultures throughout the world, and how they resolve their unique problems of survival. Semesters: 1 Prerequisite: Level: 11, 12 Credit: 1/2 Taxonomy: 227/228 PSYCHOLOGY This course is designed to familiarize students with the nature of psychology, its basic structure and its broad purposes in contemporary life. Students are introduced to human physiology, abnormal behavior, learning, memory, human growth and development, and are encouraged to apply the principles of psychology to their own lives. Particular attention is paid to essential social studies skills in reading, analysis, and application of data that relate to the patterns of human behavior. The goal of the course is for students to appreciate the commonality of all human behavior, while accepting the uniqueness of each individual. back to index 97 Semesters: 1 Prerequisite: None Levels: 11, 12 Credit: 1/2 Taxonomy: 223/224 Honors Level WORLD STUDIES I & II (H) This course meets the state civics requirement World Studies I & II are designed to prepare students in 9th and 10th grades to be critical consumers of information related to diverse global cultures and issues. Students will develop historical and social science critical reading and thinking skills through the use of primary and secondary source documents in order to develop and defend logical and informed interpretations about enduring thematic understandings. Course experiences will also prepare students to become more knowledgeable and active citizens. Finally, these courses will challenge students to develop skills reflective of a variety of college and career readiness standards, as well as prepare them to successfully complete more advanced social science coursework later in high school. The honors level sequence will accomplish this at a more accelerated rate because it introduces skill sets associated with Advanced Placement Coursework. Semesters: 2 Prerequisite: Successful completion of level I of World Studies before enrolling in level II unless special permission is granted due to scheduling conflicts and/or a need to repeat the course. Students not originally placed at the honors level, may transition from general to honors by (1) following the districts course transfer guidelines and procedures, (2) experiencing academic success in the current coursework, (3) receiving recommendation from the instructor and (4) approval of the division leader. Level: 9, 10 Credit: per semester Taxonomy:239/240 MODERN WORLD HISTORY (H) back to index 98 This course begins with historical events at the end of World War II. The creation of the United Nations will be a focal point. The rise of the United States and the U.S.S.R. as superpowers will be examined. The nationalist movements in Africa, India, and the Middle East will be studied. The role of Latin America in international relations will be studied. The influence of Communist China in Asia and modern world history will be examined. Another area of study will be the collapse of the Soviet Union and its effect on global politics. Semesters: 1 Level: 11, 12 Credit: 1/2 Taxonomy: 231/232 Advanced Placement Level ADVANCED PLACEMENT EUROPEAN HISTORY This course meets the state civics requirement The 2010 College Board AP Course Description Guide states, The study of European history since 1450 introduces students to cultural, economic, political, and social developments that played a fundamental role in shaping the world in which they live. The goals of AP European History are for students to develop (a) an understanding of some of the principal themes in modern European history, (b) an ability to analyze historical evidence and historical interpretation, and (c) an ability to express historical understanding in writing. This course is targeted for students that are highly motivated, passionate about history, and demonstrate strong reading and writing skills. Students will prepare for the AP European History exam. Semesters: 2 Prerequisites: Approval of division leader. Level: 9 (with approval of division leader), 10, 11, 12 Credit: per semester Taxonomy: 235/236 Additional Information: Fees may not cover all expenses including the cost of the AP exam. back to index 99 To learn more about this course from a CHSD 155 teacher, visit https://sites.google.com/a/d155.org/clsapcourses/international-studies. To access a brief two-page course overview developed by the College Board, visit https://secure-media.collegeboard.org/digitalServices/pdf/ap/ap-course-overviews/ap-european-history-course-overview.pdf. If interested in the Advanced Placement credit policy at a particular college or university, then please visit https://apstudent.collegeboard.org/creditandplacement/search-credit-policies. ADVANCED PLACEMENT U.S. GOVERNMENT & POLITICS This course meets the state civics requirement AP U.S. Government and Politics will give students an analytical perspective on government and politics in the United States. This course includes both the study of general concepts used to interpret U.S. government and politics and the analysis of specific examples. It also requires familiarity with the various institutions, groups, beliefs, and ideas that constitute U.S. government and politics. Topics covered include, but are not limited to, constitutional underpinnings of the U.S. government, political beliefs and behaviors, political parties, interest groups and mass media, institutions of national government, public policy, civil rights and civil liberties. Semesters: 2 Prerequisites: Approval of division leader. Level: 10, 11, 12 Credit: 1 Taxonomy: 257/258 Additional Information: Fees may not cover all expenses including the cost of the AP exam. To access a course overview developed by College Board, visit https://secure-media.collegeboard.org/digitalServices/pdf/ap/ap-us-government-and-politics-course-description.pdf If interested in the Advanced Placement credit policy at a particular college or university, then please visit https://apstudent.collegeboard.org/creditandplacement/search-credit-policies. back to index 100 https://sites.google.com/a/d155.org/clsapcourses/international-studieshttps://secure-media.collegeboard.org/digitalServices/pdf/ap/ap-course-overviews/ap-european-history-course-overview.pdfhttps://secure-media.collegeboard.org/digitalServices/pdf/ap/ap-course-overviews/ap-european-history-course-overview.pdfhttps://apstudent.collegeboard.org/creditandplacement/search-credit-policieshttps://secure-media.collegeboard.org/digitalServices/pdf/ap/ap-us-government-and-politics-course-description.pdfhttps://secure-media.collegeboard.org/digitalServices/pdf/ap/ap-us-government-and-politics-course-description.pdfhttps://apstudent.collegeboard.org/creditandplacement/search-credit-policiesADVANCED PLACEMENT U.S. HISTORY This course meets the United States History graduation requirement This course is limited to a select group of juniors who have demonstrated a high proficiency in reading, writing, and historical skills. Students will spend time interpreting and analyzing primary sources, writing papers, completing projects, and doing outside reading to prepare for the AP United States History exam which is required for all students in the class. Semesters: 2 Prerequisites: Approval of division leader. Level: 10, 11, 12 Credit: 1 Taxonomy: 229/230 Additional Information: Fees may not cover all expenses including the cost of the AP exam. To learn more about these courses, visit https://sites.google.com/a/d155.org/clsapcourses/international-studies. If interested in the Advanced Placement credit policy at a particular college or university, then please visit https://apstudent.collegeboard.org/creditandplacement/search-credit-policies. ADVANCED PLACEMENT PSYCHOLOGY The College Board AP Course Description Guide states, The AP Psychology course is designed to introduce students to the systematic and scientific study of the behavior and mental processes of human beings and other animals. Students are exposed to the psychological facts, principles, and phenomena associated with each of the major subfields within psychology. This year-long course also addresses the ethics and methods psychologists use in their science and practice and goes into more depth than the regular psychology course. Students will prepare for the AP Psychology exam. Semesters: 2 Prerequisites: Approval of the division leader. Level: 10, 11, 12 Credit: per semester Taxonomy: 233/234 Additional Information: Fees may not cover all expenses including the cost of the AP exam. back to index 101 https://sites.google.com/a/d155.org/clsapcourses/international-studieshttps://apstudent.collegeboard.org/creditandplacement/search-credit-policiesTo learn more about this course from a CHSD 155 teacher, visit https://sites.google.com/a/d155.org/clsapcourses/international-studies. To access a brief two-page course overview developed by the College Board, visit http://media.collegeboard.com/digitalServices/pdf/ap/ap-course-overviews/ap-psychology-course-overview.pdf. If interested in the Advanced Placement credit policy at a particular college or university, then please visit https://apstudent.collegeboard.org/creditandplacement/search-credit-policies. ADVANCED PLACEMENT MICROECONOMICS The 2014 College Board AP Course Description Guide states, AP Microeconomics is an introductory college-level course that focuses on the principles of economics that apply to the functions of individual economic decision-makers. The course also develops students familiarity with the operation of product and factor markets, distributions of income, market failure, and the role of government in promoting greater efficiency and equity in the economy. Students learn to use graphs, charts, and data to analyze, describe and explain economic concepts. This course is targeting students that are highly motivated, demonstrate critical thinking skills, math skills, and an interest in business related matters. Students will prepare for the AP Microeconomics exam. Students taking this course are required to also enroll in AP Macroeconomics during the same school year. Due to a variety of matters including, but not limited to the sequence and pacing of the curriculum, students will not meet the consumer education graduation requirement unless they successfully complete both AP Microeconomics and AP Macroeconomics. Semesters: 1 Prerequisites: Approval of the division leader. Students must demonstrate strong competencies in mathematics. Level: 10, 11, 12 Credit: per semester Taxonomy: 251/252 Additional Information: Fees may not cover all expenses including the cost of the AP exam. back to index 102 https://sites.google.com/a/d155.org/clsapcourses/international-studieshttp://media.collegeboard.com/digitalServices/pdf/ap/ap-course-overviews/ap-psychology-course-overview.pdfhttp://media.collegeboard.com/digitalServices/pdf/ap/ap-course-overviews/ap-psychology-course-overview.pdfhttps://apstudent.collegeboard.org/creditandplacement/search-credit-policies To learn more about this course from a CHSD 155 teacher, visit https://sites.google.com/a/d155.org/clsapcourses/international-studies. To access a brief two-page course overview developed by the College Board, visit http://media.collegeboard.com/digitalServices/pdf/ap/ap-course-overviews/ap-microeconomics-course-overview.pdf. If interested in the Advanced Placement credit policy at a particular college or university, then please visit https://apstudent.collegeboard.org/creditandplacement/search-credit-policies. ADVANCED PLACEMENT MACROECONOMICS The 2014 College Board AP Course Description Guide states, AP Macroeconomics is an introductory college-level course that focuses on the principles of economics that apply to an economic system as a whole. The course places particular emphasis on the study of national income and price-level determination; it also develops students familiarity with economic performance measures, the financial sector, stabilization policies, economic growth, and the international economics. Students learn to use graphs, charts, and data to analyze, describe, and explain economic concepts. This course is targeting students that are highly motivated, demonstrate critical thinking skills, math skills, and an interest in business related matters. Students will prepare for the AP Macroeconomics exam. Students taking this course are required to also enroll in AP Microeconomics during the same school year. Due to a variety of matters including, but not limited to the sequence and pacing of the curriculum, students will not meet the consumer education requirement unless they successfully complete both AP Microeconomics and AP Macroeconomics. Additional Information: Fees may not cover all expenses including the cost of the AP exam. To learn more about this course from a CHSD 155 teacher, visit https://sites.google.com/a/d155.org/clsapcourses/international-studies. To access a brief two-page course overview developed by the College Board, visit back to index 103 https://sites.google.com/a/d155.org/clsapcourses/international-studieshttp://media.collegeboard.com/digitalServices/pdf/ap/ap-course-overviews/ap-microeconomics-course-overview.pdfhttp://media.collegeboard.com/digitalServices/pdf/ap/ap-course-overviews/ap-microeconomics-course-overview.pdfhttps://apstudent.collegeboard.org/creditandplacement/search-credit-policieshttps://sites.google.com/a/d155.org/clsapcourses/international-studieshttp://media.collegeboard.com/digitalServices/pdf/ap/ap-course-overviews/ap-macroeconomics-course-overview.pdf. If interested in the Advanced Placement credit policy at a particular college or university, then please visit https://apstudent.collegeboard.org/creditandplacement/search-credit-policies. Semesters: 1 Prerequisites: Approval of the division leader. Students must demonstrate strong competencies in mathematics. Level: 10, 11, 12 Credit: per semester Taxonomy: 253/254 ADVANCED PLACEMENT HUMAN GEOGRAPHY This course meets the state civics requirement The 2013 College Board AP Course Description Guide states, The purpose of the AP Human Geography course is to introduce students to the systematic study of patterns and processes that have shaped human understanding, use, and alteration of Earths surface. Students learn to employ spatial concepts and landscape analysis to examine human socioeconomic organization and its environmental consequences. They also learn about the methods and tools geographers use in their research and applications. This year-long course targets students that are highly motivated, demonstrate critical thinking, analysis, and interpretive skills, as well as possess an interest in maps and geospatial data (e.g., natural or constructed features). Students will prepare for the AP Human Geography exam. Semesters: 2 Prerequisites: Approval of the division leader. Level: 9, 10, 11, 12 Credit: per semester Taxonomy: 255/256 Additional Information: Fees may not cover all expenses including the cost of the AP exam. To learn more about this course from a CHSD 155 teacher, visit https://sites.google.com/a/d155.org/clsapcourses/international-studies. back to index 104 http://media.collegeboard.com/digitalServices/pdf/ap/ap-course-overviews/ap-macroeconomics-course-overview.pdfhttp://media.collegeboard.com/digitalServices/pdf/ap/ap-course-overviews/ap-macroeconomics-course-overview.pdfhttps://apstudent.collegeboard.org/creditandplacement/search-credit-policieshttps://sites.google.com/a/d155.org/clsapcourses/international-studies To access a brief two-page course overview developed by the College Board, visit http://media.collegeboard.com/digitalServices/pdf/ap/ap-course-overviews/ap-human-geography-course-overview.pdf. If interested in the Advanced Placement credit policy at a particular college or university, then please visit https://apstudent.collegeboard.org/creditandplacement/search-credit-policies. back to index 105 http://media.collegeboard.com/digitalServices/pdf/ap/ap-course-overviews/ap-human-geography-course-overview.pdfhttp://media.collegeboard.com/digitalServices/pdf/ap/ap-course-overviews/ap-human-geography-course-overview.pdfhttps://apstudent.collegeboard.org/creditandplacement/search-credit-policies_______________________ WORLD LANGUAGE The student wishing to develop proficiency in a world language should plan a four year program. For college admissions purposes, two to four years of a language are recommended. Due to the nature of these courses, the pass/fail or audit options are not available. FRENCH I This course focuses on development of language proficiency so that students can communicate effectively and with confidence. Throughout the program, listening, speaking, reading, writing, and cultural information are interwoven. A strong grammar foundation furthers the goal of communicative competence. Students begin developing practical, functional use of French while gaining insights into the culture, history, and geography of the francophone world. Semesters: 2 Prerequisite: None Level: 9, 10, 11, 12 Credit: l/2 per semester Taxonomy: 401/402 FRENCH II This course continues the French I program, with increased emphasis on language proficiency. The four language skills as well as a study of the culture are further developed using a functional approach of instruction. Reading selections are more sophisticated, and the grammar base is broadened. back to index 106 Semesters: 2 Prerequisite: French I or permission of teacher Level: 10, 11, 12 Credit: l/2 per semester Taxonomy: 403/404 FRENCH III - HONORS This course introduces more advanced aspects of the French language while maintaining a curriculum model and instructional style familiar to students. They are challenged to further develop skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing. The study of literature and culture is expanded. Appropriate expression is fostered in many and varied communication situations. Students will prepare for the Advanced Placement exam and other French college placement tests. Semesters: 2 Prerequisite: French II or permission of teacher Level: 11, 12 Credit: l/2 per semester Taxonomy: 405/406 FRENCH IV - HONORS This course emphasizes the functional or task-based approach used in the first levels of the program. All four skills are advanced; grammar is dealt with contextually, and cultural awareness is promoted. Students learn to handle a variety of communication tasks with greater confidence. These include: telling stories, describing temperament and character, stating and supporting opinions, hypothesizing. Students read and analyze literary passages, as well as excerpts from newspapers, magazines, and advertisements. Creative and original expression is encouraged. Students will prepare for college placement tests in French. Semesters: 2 Prerequisite: French III or permission of teacher Level: 11, 12 Credit: l/2 per semester Taxonomy: 407/408 ADVANCED PLACEMENT FRENCH back to index 107 Advanced Placement French is an intense course conducted in French intended to cover the equivalent of a third-year college course in advanced French composition and conversation. Emphasizing the use of French for active communication, it encompasses aural/oral skills, reading comprehension, grammar, and composition. The course objectives are to help students comprehend formal and informal spoken French, acquire vocabulary to allow the accurate reading of authentic literature, compose expository passages, and express ideas orally with accuracy and fluency. Semesters: 2 Prerequisite: Approval of division leader. Level: 11, 12 Credits: 1/2 per semester Taxonomy: 411/412 Additional Information: Fees may not cover all expenses including the cost of the AP exam. To access a brief two-page course overview developed by the College Board, visit http://media.collegeboard.com/digitalServices/pdf/ap/ap-course-overviews/ap-french-language-and-culture-course-overview.pdf. To learn more about these courses, visit https://sites.google.com/a/d155.org/clsapcourses/international-studies. If interested in the Advanced Placement credit policy at a particular college or university, then please visit https://apstudent.collegeboard.org/creditandplacement/search-credit-policies. GERMAN I The functionally driven scope and sequence of German I gives students reasons to communicate. As a result, they develop proficiency in the four language skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing) and build their critical thinking skills. Grammar is presented in context to enhance the students ability to communicate with accuracy and confidence. Authentic dialogues, interviews, photos, and videos develop the students appreciation and understanding of the German-speaking world. Semesters: 2 Prerequisite: None Level: 9, 10, 11, 12 back to index 108 http://media.collegeboard.com/digitalServices/pdf/ap/ap-course-overviews/ap-french-language-and-culture-course-overview.pdfhttp://media.collegeboard.com/digitalServices/pdf/ap/ap-course-overviews/ap-french-language-and-culture-course-overview.pdfhttps://sites.google.com/a/d155.org/clsapcourses/international-studieshttps://apstudent.collegeboard.org/creditandplacement/search-credit-policiesCredit: 1/2 per semester Taxonomy: 413/414 GERMAN II This course continues the German I program and enhances the development of students linguistic proficiency. The four language skills, along with situational grammar, continue to progress and develop students competency as an effective communicator. In addition to this is the continued exposure to German culture within the context of the chapters. Semesters: 2 Prerequisite: German I or permission of teacher Level: 10, 11, 12 Credit: 1/2 per semester Taxonomy: 415/416 GERMAN III - HONORS This course introduces more advanced aspects of the German language, while continuing to use the curriculum model and familiar instructional style to the students first two years. The four language skills of reading, writing, listening and speaking are further developed. The study of authentic literature increases along with the expectations of students communicative ability in all of the four areas of linguistic proficiency. Students will prepare for college placement tests in German. Semesters: 2 Prerequisite: German II or permission of teacher Level: 11, 12 Credit: l/2 per semester Taxonomy: 417/418 GERMAN IV - HONORS This honors level course in conducted in German. Students continue to develop their skills in the four areas. Authentic literature pieces are used to challenge students in their skills as critical readers and writers. Their grammar base is expanded along with their active vocabulary. Conversation between classmates continues to develop their ability to effectively communicate in German. Students will prepare for the Advanced Placement exam and other German college placement tests. Semesters: 2 back to index 109 Prerequisite: German III or permission of teacher Level: 11, 12 Credit: l/2 per semester Taxonomy: 419/420 ADVANCED PLACEMENT GERMAN AP German is an intense course conducted in German intended to cover the equivalent of a third-year college course in advanced German composition and conversation as well as prepare for the AP German Language Exam. Emphasizing the use of German for active communication, it encompasses aural/oral skills, reading, comprehension, grammar, and composition. The course objectives are to help students comprehend formal and informal spoken German, acquire vocabulary to allow the accurate reading of authentic literature, compose expository passages, and express ideas orally with accuracy and fluency. Semesters: 2 Prerequisite: Approval of division leader. Level: 11, 12 Credits: 1/2 per semester Taxonomy: 423/424 Additional Information: Fees may not cover all expenses including the cost of the AP exam. To learn more about this course from a CHSD 155 teacher, visit https://sites.google.com/a/d155.org/clsapcourses/international-studies. To access a brief two-page course description developed by the College Board, visit http://media.collegeboard.com/digitalServices/pdf/ap/ap-course-overviews/ap-german-language-and-culture-course-overview.pdf. If interested in the Advanced Placement credit policy at a particular college or university, then please visit https://apstudent.collegeboard.org/creditandplacement/search-credit-policies. SPANISH I Students learn the skills to survive in the Spanish-speaking world through development grammar and real-life applications that encourage communication, divergent thinking, and cooperative learning. Communication in Spanish flows as naturally and back to index 110 https://sites.google.com/a/d155.org/clsapcourses/international-studieshttp://media.collegeboard.com/digitalServices/pdf/ap/ap-course-overviews/ap-german-language-and-culture-course-overview.pdfhttp://media.collegeboard.com/digitalServices/pdf/ap/ap-course-overviews/ap-german-language-and-culture-course-overview.pdfhttps://apstudent.collegeboard.org/creditandplacement/search-credit-policiesspontaneously as possible through all phases of learning. The student is expected to master language functions in manageable amounts with ample opportunity to exchange information and express themselves meaningfully -- both in spoken and written formats. The cultural awareness skills emphasize the human, dynamic aspect of Spanish and guide students to think more critically by comparing culturally determined behaviors and beliefs with their own. Semesters: 2 Prerequisite: None Level: 9, 10, 11, 12 Credit: l/2 per semester Taxonomy: 425/426 SPANISH II Students continue learning language functions by engaging in the process of communicating in Spanish. Students are actively involved in comprehending and responding appropriately to oral and written messages. Communication in Spanish continues to flow as naturally and spontaneously as possible through all phases of learning. Throughout the year, students are encouraged to speak within purposeful real-life contexts. The cultural topics guide students in how they should express themselves within authentic cultural context. Students will see and hear native Spanish speakers within culturally authentic contexts. Students gain greater understanding and acceptance of cultural differences by focusing as much on what people share as human beings as on the cultural differences that separate them. Semesters: 2 Prerequisite: Spanish I or permission of teacher Level: 9, 10, 11, 12 Credit: l/2 per semester Taxonomy: 427/428 ACCELERATED SPANISH II This Spanish course is designed to prepare students to use Spanish to communicate for a variety of purposes and to appreciate the diverse cultures of the Spanish speaking world. Students will review key concepts from Spanish I and will learn to tell a story in the past and give advice and recommendations. Students will develop and refine their formal and informal speaking and writing skills as well as interpretive skills of reading and listening. This course moves at an accelerated pace and explores concepts to a greater depth than the regular Spanish II course. Students will also gain an awareness back to index 111 of the advances communication and synthesis skills assessed on the AP Spanish Language test. Semesters: 2 Prerequisite: Teacher recommendation Level: Credit: l/2 per semester Taxonomy: 435/436 SPANISH III - HONORS Spanish III continues the integrated development of language and learning skills begun in Spanish I and II in order to build successful communication strategies for real life situations. The student is encouraged to personalize language skills presented in a contextual, natural format through expanded communication, both spoken and written. Students interact using the language in contemporary, high-interest contexts, including tasks and projects that reflect natural language use. The skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing are reality-based and purposeful. Semesters: 2 Prerequisite: Spanish II or permission of teacher Level: 9, 10, 11, 12 Credit: 1/2 per semester Taxonomy: 429/430 ACCELERATED SPANISH III HONORS This Spanish course is designed to prepare students to use Spanish to communicate for a variety of purposes and to appreciate the diverse cultures of the Spanish speaking world. Students will review key concepts from Spanish II and will learn to express opinions and reactions and describe future events. Students will develop and refine their formal and informal speaking and writing skills as well as interpretive skills of reading and listening. This course moves at an accelerated pace and explores concepts to a greater depth than the regular Spanish III course. It also challenges students to develop advanced communication and synthesis skills assessed on the AP Spanish Language test. Semesters: 2 Prerequisite: Teacher Recommendation; Accelerated Spanish II highly recommended. Level: 9, 10, 11, 12 Credit: l/2 per semester back to index 112 Taxonomy: 439/440 SPANISH IV - HONORS Spanish IV (H) Students will develop and refine speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills in Spanish in addition to an understanding of the diverse Hispanic culture. They will develop the ability to comprehend, analyze and discuss a variety of texts along with independent reading skills. Students will prepare for college placement tests in Spanish. Semesters: 2 Prerequisite: Spanish III or permission of teacher Level: 10, 11, 12 Credits: 1/2 per semester Taxonomy: 431/432 SPANISH IV HONORS (DUAL CREDIT) Students that meet the prerequisites below have an opportunity to enroll in Spanish IV Honors for dual credit (both high school and college credit). Those that complete this year-long course with a C or better will earn 8 credits from McHenry County College (MCC). The course is offered at CHSD 155 schools and taught by CHSD 155 instructors that meet MCC instructor requirements. Spanish IV Honors (Dual Credit) explores many of the areas addressed in the non-dual credit course of the same title including the history and culture of the Spanish speaking world, reviews of grammar structures previously learned, and the refinement of communication and comprehension skills. The use of interactive technology will also reinforce skill development and cultural awareness. The MCC High School Plus Registration Form available at https://www.mchenry.edu/highschoolplus/hsplus_reg_form.pdf must be completed with the required signatures and submitted to the counselors office. In some instances, students may also be required to purchase an additional textbook, workbook or other related course material at MCC as a result of this partnership. Please contact the International Studies Division Leader at your school for information related to purchasing these materials. back to index 113 https://www.mchenry.edu/highschoolplus/hsplus_reg_form.pdfhttps://www.mchenry.edu/highschoolplus/hsplus_reg_form.pdfCHSD 155 does not guarantee every post high school institution will accept the MCC credits, so parents and students are encouraged to communicate with the admissions officer at the college or university of interest regarding this matter. The grading scale at MCC is different than CHSD 155. MCC does not award letter grades with plusses or minuses which is different than the grading system in CHSD 155. For instance, a B+ earned in CHSD 155 is a B at MCC. As a result, it is possible that the grades reported on the MCC and CHSD 155 report cards and transcripts vary. Students will receive an additional report card from MCC including grade(s) and course credit information. Semesters: 2 Prerequisites: Meet or exceed the required score on the MCC Spanish Placement Exam and approval of Division Leader. Students must also earn a C or better 1st semester in Spanish IV Honors (Dual Credit) to continue participating in this course 2nd semester. Level: 11, 12 CHSD 155 Credit: 1/2 per semester MCC Credits: 4 per semester Taxonomy: 431DC/432DC ADVANCED PLACEMENT SPANISH LANGUAGE & CULTURE Advanced Placement Spanish Language & Culture is an intense course conducted in Spanish intended to cover the equivalent of a third-year college course in advanced Spanish composition and conversation. Emphasizing the use of Spanish for active communication, it encompasses aural/oral skills, reading comprehension, grammar, and composition. The course objectives are to help students comprehend formal and informal spoken Spanish, acquire vocabulary to allow the accurate reading of authentic literature, compose expository passages, and express ideas orally with accuracy and fluency. Students will prepare for the AP Spanish Language exam. Semesters: 2 Prerequisite: Approval of the division leader Level: 10, 11, 12 Credits: 1/2 per semester Taxonomy: 433/434 To access a brief two-page course description developed by the College Board, visit https://secure-media.collegeboard.org/digitalServices/pdf/ap/ap-course-overviews/ap-spanish-language-and-culture-course-overview.pdf. back to index 114 https://secure-media.collegeboard.org/digitalServices/pdf/ap/ap-course-overviews/ap-spanish-language-and-culture-course-overview.pdfhttps://secure-media.collegeboard.org/digitalServices/pdf/ap/ap-course-overviews/ap-spanish-language-and-culture-course-overview.pdf ADVANCED PLACEMENT SPANISH LITERATURE & CULTURE Advanced Placement Spanish Literature & Culture uses a thematic approach to introduce students to representative texts (short stories, novels, poetry and essays) from Peninsular Spanish, Latin American, and United States Hispanic literature. Students develop proficiencies across the full range of communication modes (interpersonal, presentational, and interpretive), thereby honing their critical reading and analytical writing skills. Literature is examined within the context of its time and place, as students reflect on the many voices and cultures present in the required readings. The course also includes a strong focus on cultural connections and comparisons, including exploration of various media (e.g., art, film, articles, literary criticism). Students will prepare for the AP Spanish Literature exam. Semesters: 2 Prerequisite: Successful completion of AP Spanish Language & Culture and the approval of division leader Level: 11, 12 Credits: 1/2 per semester Taxonomy: 433LIT/434LIT To access a brief two-page course overview developed by the College Board, visit https://secure-media.collegeboard.org/digitalServices/pdf/ap/ap-course-overviews/ap-spanish-literature-culture.pdf. CHINESE I Chinese I is an introduction to the Chinese language and culture. The four language skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing are developed with an emphasis on the first two. Grammar concepts and vocabulary are introduced and practiced in the classroom and reinforced through frequent homework assignments. Students will be expected to participate actively and cooperatively in all classroom activities, i.e. engaging in guided conversations, making individual and group presentations, and writing paragraphs utilizing familiar vocabulary and structures. Cultural information about daily life and social customs is integrated into the curriculum. Students will be evaluated primarily on their knowledge of the Chinese language and culture and on their ability to understand and communicate in Chinese. This course is not recommended for heritage (native) speakers. Semesters: 2 Prerequisite: Approval of the division leader back to index 115 https://secure-media.collegeboard.org/digitalServices/pdf/ap/ap-course-overviews/ap-spanish-literature-culture.pdfhttps://secure-media.collegeboard.org/digitalServices/pdf/ap/ap-course-overviews/ap-spanish-literature-culture.pdfLevel: 9, 10, 11, 12 Credit: 1/2 per semester Taxonomy: 449/450 CHINESE II This course continues the Chinese I program. Students will progress and develop the four language skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing. Cultural information will also continue to be integrated into the curriculum. Semesters: 2 Prerequisite: Chinese I or permission of teacher Levels: 9, 10, 11, 12 Credit: 1/2 per semester Taxonomy: 451/452 CHINESE III HONORS Chinese III continues to develop students abilities in listening, speaking, reading, and writing for daily communication, including the use of more advanced grammar and vocabulary. The study of Chinese literature, in the form of Chinese idiom stories, will be used as an interesting way to introduce Chinese history and traditions as well as to expose students to important formal and written expressions. The writing assignments and class discussions are guided and structured. Projects and oral presentations are also an integral part of the course. Semesters: 2 Prerequisite: Chinese II or permission of teacher Levels: 11, 12 Credit: 1/2 per semester Taxonomy: 453/454 CHINESE IV - HONORS Chinese IV (H) interweaves language and contemporary culture learning with ample exposure to authentic materials of the target language to further develop student proficiencies across the full range of language skills. These include studying of history, art and music, films, cultural readings, and newspapers. Students will develop an ability to describe, discuss, summarize, and defend their opinions on various topics both orally and in writing. Semesters: 2 back to index 116 Prerequisite: Chinese III (H) or permission of the teacher Level: 12 Credit: 1/2 per semester Taxonomy: 455/456 _______________________ NON-DEPARTMENTAL COURSES AVID (Freshmen through Senior Years) back to index 117 The overall goal for students enrolled in Advancement Via Individual Determination (AVID) is to develop/strengthen fundamental academic skills, to prepare students for four-year college eligibility and readiness. This elective course provides tutorial support, writing instruction, reinforcement of study skills, time management techniques, and motivational activities. There is an emphasis on analytical writing, preparation for college entrance and placement exams, study and test-taking skills, note taking and research. Semesters: 2 Levels: 9-12 Credit: elective credit per semester Taxonomy: 871/872 Freshmen AVID, 873/874 Sophomore AVID, 875/876 Junior AVID, 877/878 Senior AVID SEMINAR (Freshmen through Senior Years) Life is about having a plan so that you can take the proper steps to achieve your goals. This four-year seminar series is where you will identify your goals, create your plan and learn the skills necessary to help your high school and post-secondary plans become a reality. During seminar, you will explore your current skills, connect those skills to careers and learn what academic options are available post high school to help you reach those career goals. You will establish a planning portfolio and revise this portfolio each year of high school so that you are prepared to make informed decisions during senior year. Seminar is led by counselors and serves as the venue where the primary counseling curriculum is delivered. The counseling curriculum addresses academic, post-secondary and social emotional issues that students face at the various stages of high school. Grades and credit are not awarded in these courses. Duration: 9 weeks Levels: 9-12 Taxonomy: 863/864 Freshmen Seminar, 865/866 Sophomore Seminar, 867/868 Junior Seminar, and 869/870 Senior Seminar back to index 118 _______________________ back to index 119 STEM _______________________ MATHEMATICS COURSE SEQUENCE back to index 120 back to index 121 _______________________ MATHEMATICS Basic Level MATH I Emphasis is on the understanding of fundamental mathematical operations. The main areas of concentration are addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division. Additional focus is given to fractions, decimals, and percents. Placement is only available through staff conference recommendation. Semesters: 2 Prerequisite: Approval of Special Education division leader is required. Level: 9 Credit: 1/2 per semester Taxonomy: 019/020 MATH II PRE-ALGEBRA This course builds students skills in the areas of order of operations, variables and expressions, mathematical properties, and equations in preparation for the curriculum in an algebra class. Placement is only available through staff conference recommendation. Semesters: 2 Prerequisite: Successful completion of Math I and approval of Special Education division leader. Level: 9, 10 Credit: 1/2 per semester Taxonomy: 021/022 MATH III ALGEBRA Algebra skills are developed through attention to the following topics: order of operations, variables & expressions, solving equations and inequalities, manipulating polynomials, simplifying rational expressions and solving rational equations, and solving back to index 122 quadratic equations. Placement is only available through staff conference recommendation. Semesters: 2 Prerequisite: Successful completion of Math II and approval of Special Education division leader. Level: 9, 10, 11 Credit: 1/2 per semester Taxonomy: 023/024 MATH IV GEOMETRY This course exposes students to the fundamental concepts of geometry. Topics including solving and writing proofs, identifying and applying properties and classifications of polygons, and the measurement of area and volume will be emphasized. Placement is only available through staff conference recommendation. Semesters: 2 Prerequisite: Successful completion of Math II and approval of Special Education division leader. Level: 10, 11, 12 Credit: 1/2 per semester Taxonomy: 025/026 MATH V This course is designed to provide continued work with algebraic concepts. The content includes formulas, equations, graphing, and factoring. Students should have previously mastered basic math operations such as fractions, decimals, and percents. Placement is only available through staff conference recommendation. Semesters: 2 Prerequisite: Successful completion of Math IV and approval of Special Education division leader. Level: 11, 12 Credit: 1/2 per semester Prerequisite: Teacher recommendation Taxonomy: 027/028 ALGEBRA back to index 123 This course represents a basic approach towards Algebra. It mirrors the general Algebra course, but not all topics are studied at the same depth. Topics include, but are not limited to order of operations, variables & expressions, solving one and two variable equations and inequalities, operations with linear equations, performing operations on polynomials including multiplying binomials, factoring trinomials and solving quadratic equations. Semesters: 2 Prerequisite: Teacher recommendation Credit: l/2 per semester Taxonomy: 355/356 GEOMETRY This course represents a basic approach towards Geometry. It mirrors the general Geometry course, but not all topics are studied at the same depth. Topics include, but are not limited to the properties of plane figures. It also contains some three dimensional concepts. Algebra is used extensively throughout the course. Geometry teaches the students to think accurately, logically, critically, and to set forth their thoughts in a well-organized, orderly fashion. Semesters: 2 Prerequisite: Algebra Credit: l/2 per semester Taxonomy: 357/358 General Level ALGEBRA This is a foundation course for further high school mathematics. An understanding of algebra is developed through study of the following topics: order of operations, variables & expressions, solving one and two variable equations and inequalities, operations with linear equations, performing operations on polynomials including multiplying binomials, factoring trinomials and solving quadratic equations. Semesters: 2 Prerequisite: Teacher recommendation Level: 9 Credit: l/2 per semester Taxonomy: 361/362 back to index 124 INTERMEDIATE ALGEBRA Algebraic topics such as the real number system, equations, inequalities, graphing, functions, exponents, factoring, manipulating expressions, radicals, quadratics, are reviewed and expanded on in this course. Semesters: 2 Prerequisite: Algebra and/or Geometry Level: 10, 11, 12 Credit: 1/2 per semester Taxonomy: 381/382 GEOMETRY Geometry acquaints the students with the properties of plane figures. It also contains some three dimensional concepts. Algebra is used extensively throughout the course. Geometry teaches the students to think accurately, logically, critically, and to set forth their thoughts in a well-organized, orderly fashion. Semesters: 2 Prerequisite: Algebra Level: 9, 10, 11 Credit: l/2 per semester Taxonomy: 363/364 ALGEBRA II WITH TRIGONOMETRY (formerly known as ADVANCED ALGEBRA WITH TRIGONOMETRY) Traditional topics of algebra such as exponents, radicals, functions and relations, quadratic equations, graphs and word problems are studied in this course. Logarithms are also studied. Traditional topics of trigonometry such as the study of the six trigonometric functions, solutions of right and general triangles, logarithms, radians, graphs, identities and equations are studied in this course. *A graphing calculator is required for this course. Semesters: 2 Prerequisite: Geometry Level: 10, 11, 12 Credit: l/2 per semester Taxonomy: 365/366 back to index 125 COLLEGE ALGEBRA This course is designed for students who need additional review of advanced algebraic topics before attending college and/or taking pre-calculus. Algebraic topics such as algebraic expressions, equations, inequalities, relations, functions (polynomial, rational, exponential, and logarithmic), analytic geometry, and sequences and series will be taken to a higher level. CHSD 155 has partnered with McHenry County College (MCC) to offer a year-long articulated math course titled, College Algebra. Students interested in attending MCC are required to take the COMPASS placement exam if their ACT or SAT scores are below a certain criteria. Students not scoring well enough as a result of deficient math skills or poor test performance are required to take remedial math coursework during their first year at MCC. CHSD 155 students now have an opportunity to avoid this additional expense by successfully completing College Algebra at their high school. CHSD 155 uses a curriculum and set of resources that are consistent with MCC courses titled, MAT 095 Elementary Algebra and MAT 099 Intermediate Algebra. In short, these remedial MCC math courses are the equivalent to the year-long College Algebra course provided in CHSD 155. The MCC course guide describes MAT 095 Elementary Algebra as Covering operations and applications dealing with integers, linear equations, ratios and proportions, exponents, polynomials, factoring, graphing linear equations and inequalities, and solving linear systems. The same document describes MAT 099 Intermediate Algebra as Students will study problem-solving, factoring, rational expressions, graphing, rational exponents, radicals, logarithms and quadratic equations. There is also no MCC registration fee. Students may be required to purchase course related materials such as a textbook, workbook, and/or online resources. The grading scale at MCC is different than CHSD 155. MCC does not award letter grades with pluses or minuses which is different than the grading system in CHSD 155. For instance, a B+ earned in CHSD 155 is a B at MCC. As a result, grades reported on the MCC and CHSD 155 report cards and transcripts may vary. Semesters: 2 Prerequisite: Successful completion of two semesters of a high school Geometry course; earning a C- or better in both semesters. Students in grades 11 and 12 may enroll in College Algebra, but per MCC restrictions, only students in grade 12 may qualify for articulated credit. Level: 12 Periods: 5 back to index 126 http://www.mchenry.edu/admissions/firsttime.aspCredit: Students will receive credit at the high school for each semester they successfully complete. They will also earn 4 articulated credits at MCC for each semester successfully completed; the MCC credit will not count towards a college degree. However, it will guarantee that remedial math coursework will not be necessary upon enrolling at MCC. Taxonomy: 391/392 *A graphing calculator is required for this course. PROBABILITY AND STATISTICS Attention will be given to strengthening algebraic techniques needed to consider the following topics: laws of chance, mean, median, mode, percentile, and standard deviation. This course will be good for students interested in taking more mathematics without going into more difficult abstract mathematics. A course similar to this is often required by colleges and universities for programs less math intensive such as business, education, and technical fields. *A graphing calculator is required for this course. Semesters: 2 Prerequisite: Algebra II with Trigonometry Level: 12 Credit: l/2 Taxonomy: 369/370 PRE-CALCULUS This course is designed to aid the student in preparing to do college study in the field of mathematics. It includes the traditional material on quadratic theory, systems of equations, etc., plus a thorough development in inequalities, absolute values, and solving data driven problems. Trigonometry will be reviewed and expanded using radians, identities, equations, and graphs and their transformations. This course will also contain traditional material on lines, circles, conics, and limits and differentiation. This course is specifically designed for students planning to take calculus. *A graphing calculator is required for this course. Semesters: 2 Prerequisite: Algebra II with Trigonometry Level: 11, 12 back to index 127 Credit: l/2 per semester Taxonomy: 367/368 CALCULUS Topics of differential and integral calculus are presented at the college level. Preparation for the advanced placement exam is not included. *A graphing calculator is required for this course. Semesters: 2 Prerequisite: Pre-Calculus and teacher recommendation Level: 11, 12 Credit: 1/2 per semester Taxonomy: 389/390 INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTER SCIENCE / MOBILE APP DEVELOPMENT This course meets the Computer requirement for graduation, but not the math requirement. The students will learn basic elements of coding and Android-based mobile application design and apply these concepts to problems in mathematics and related areas. Additionally, students will design algorithms to assist in solving these problems. Students will find this course designed to establish a foundation for further study in computer science and to prepare college-bound students who will need computer knowledge to carry out study and application in a variety of subject areas. *A graphing calculator is required for this course. Semesters: l Prerequisite: Algebra Level: 9, 10, 11, 12 Credit: l/2 Taxonomy: 379/380 Honors Level GEOMETRY (H) Students study deductive reasoning and proofs, many of which are original exercises. Important topics of traditional geometry are included. Modern topics are notation, logic, and coordinate geometry. Algebra is used as a tool to solve many problems. back to index 128 *A graphing calculator is required for this course. Semesters: 2 Prerequisite: Algebra and teacher recommendation Level: 9, 10 Credit: l/2 per semester Taxonomy: 371/372 ALGEBRA II WITH TRIGONOMETRY (H) (formerly known as ADVANCED ALGEBRA WITH TRIGONOMETRY (H)) Traditional topics of algebra such as exponents, radicals, functions and relations, quadratic equations, graphs and word problems are studied in this course. Factor theorem, quadratic functions-parabola-minimum and maximum points, determinants for second and third order, and solving systems of first degree equations in two and three variables using determinants are also studied. Logarithms are studied. Traditional topics of trigonometry include the study of the six trigonometric functions, solutions of right triangles, solutions of oblique triangles using laws of Sines, Cosines and Tangents (if time permits), logarithms, radians, graphs, identities and equations. Graphing curves by composition of y-coordinates and inverse functions is also studied. *A graphing calculator is required for this course. Semesters: 2 Prerequisite: Geometry (H) or teacher recommendation Level: 9, 10, 11 Credit: l/2 per semester Taxonomy: 373/374 PRE-CALCULUS (H) This course is designed to aid the student in preparing for a college study in the field of mathematics. It includes traditional material on quadratic theory, systems of equations, progressions, etc., plus a thorough development of inequalities, absolute values in one and two dimensions, nature of number systems, rectangular and polar forms and complex numbers. Also covered is traditional material on lines, circles, conics, parametric equations, and limits and differentiation. Trigonometry will be reviewed and expanded using radians, identities, equations, and graphs and their transformations. In addition, some work with permutations, combinations, and probability will be covered if back to index 129 time permits. This course is specifically designed for students planning to take advanced placement calculus. *A graphing calculator is required for this course. Semesters: 2 Prerequisite: Algebra II with Trigonometry (H) or teacher recommendation Level: 9, 10, 11, 12 Credit: l/2 per semester Taxonomy: 375/376 CALCULUS 3 DUAL CREDIT This course builds on concepts in calculus and analytic geometry including: vector analysis, Euclidean space, partial differentiation, multiple integrals, line and surface integrals, and the integral theorems of vector calculus. Students that successfully complete this course, including passing the mandatory exams, will receive 1 credit from the high school and 4 credits from the University of Illinois. For a copy of the official syllabus from the University of Illinois, please click on the link. Aspects of the syllabus are subject to change; students will be required to utilize their teachers syllabus as a primary resource as well. Students may be responsible for costs associated with the required online tool which is estimated at $90, as well as any potential costs associated with acquiring a transcript from the University of Illinois. CHSD 155 does not guarantee every post high school institution will accept the U of I credits, so parents and students are encouraged to communicate with the admissions officer at the college/university of interest regarding this matter. The grading scale at U of I may be different than CHSD 155. Many colleges/universities do not award letter grades with pluses or minuses which is different than the grading system in CHSD 155. For instance, a B+ earned in CHSD 155 may be a B at a college/university. As a result, grades reported on the U of I and CHSD 155 report cards and transcripts may vary. This course will be offered in limited capacity. During the 2017-18 school year, it is anticipated to be offered at Cary-Grove High School and Prairie Ridge High School. Students attending other CHSD 155 high schools interested in enrolling may do so, but must provide their own transportation. Prerequisite: Successful completion of AP Calculus BC or a 4 or 5 on the AP Calculus BC exam. The approval of the STEM division leader is also required. Level: 11, 12 back to index 130 https://netmath.illinois.edu/sites/default/files/syllabi/Math%20241%20syllabus.pdfPeriods: 5 Credit: Students that successfully complete both semesters will receive 1 high school credit and 4 college credits issued by the University of Illinois. Taxonomy: 389C3/390C3 Additional Information: University of Illinois will not issue credit for more than one of the following courses: MATH 241 and MATH 242, MATH 243, MATH 244, or MATH 380. Advanced Placement Level ADVANCED PLACEMENT COMPUTER SCIENCE This course meets the Computer requirement for graduation. Computer science encompasses the collection of technical skills and scientific methodologies used in the creation of high quality computer based solutions to real problems. This is more than a programming course. Topics include modular program design, control structures, recursion, data structures, algorithms, searching, sorting, and modeling. A goal of the course is to prepare students for the Advanced Placement computer science exam. *A graphing calculator is required for this course. Semesters: 2 Prerequisite: Geometry or teacher recommendation Level: 9, 10, 11, 12 Credit: 1/2 per semester Taxonomy: 383/384 Additional Information: Fees may not cover all expenses including the cost of the AP exam. To learn more about these courses from a CHSD 155 teacher, visit https://sites.google.com/a/d155.org/clsapcourses/stem. To view a brief two-page course overview developed by the College Board, please visit https://secure-media.collegeboard.org/digitalServices/pdf/ap/ap-course-overviews/ap-computer-science-a-course-overview.pdf back to index 131 https://sites.google.com/a/d155.org/clsapcourses/stemhttps://secure-media.collegeboard.org/digitalServices/pdf/ap/ap-course-overviews/ap-computer-science-a-course-overview.pdfhttps://secure-media.collegeboard.org/digitalServices/pdf/ap/ap-course-overviews/ap-computer-science-a-course-overview.pdfIf interested in the Advanced Placement credit policy at a particular college or university, then please visit https://apstudent.collegeboard.org/creditandplacement/search-credit-policies. Successful completion of this course may count towards the mathematics graduation requirement if the student has earned 2.0 credits in other math coursework; of which a 1.0 must be Algebra II. ADVANCED PLACEMENT CALCULUS AB Topics of differential and integral calculus are presented at the college level, with special emphasis on understanding and deriving the usual general formulas. Preparation for the Advanced Placement AB examination is included. *A graphing calculator is required for this course. Semesters: 2 Prerequisite: Pre-Calculus or teacher recommendations Level: 11, 12 Credit: l/2 per semester Taxonomy: 377/378 Additional Information: Fees may not cover all expenses including the cost of the AP exam. To learn more about these courses from a CHSD 155 teacher, visit https://sites.google.com/a/d155.org/clsapcourses/stem. To view a brief two-page course description developed by the College Board, visit http://media.collegeboard.com/digitalServices/pdf/ap/ap-course-overviews/ap-calculus-ab-course-overview.pdf. If interested in the Advanced Placement credit policy at a particular college or university, then please visit https://apstudent.collegeboard.org/creditandplacement/search-credit-policies. ADVANCED PLACEMENT CALCULUS BC Topics of differential and integral calculus are presented at the college level, with special emphasis on understanding and deriving the usual general formulas. Preparation for the Advanced Placement BC examination is included. back to index 132 https://apstudent.collegeboard.org/creditandplacement/search-credit-policieshttps://sites.google.com/a/d155.org/clsapcourses/stemhttp://media.collegeboard.com/digitalServices/pdf/ap/ap-course-overviews/ap-calculus-ab-course-overview.pdfhttp://media.collegeboard.com/digitalServices/pdf/ap/ap-course-overviews/ap-calculus-ab-course-overview.pdfhttps://apstudent.collegeboard.org/creditandplacement/search-credit-policies*A graphing calculator is required for this course. Semesters: 2 Prerequisite: Pre-Calculus (H) or teacher recommendation Level: 11, 12 Credit: l/2 per semester Taxonomy: 385/386 Additional Information: Fees may not cover all expenses including the cost of the AP exam. To learn more about this course from a CHSD 155 teacher, visit https://sites.google.com/a/d155.org/clsapcourses/stem. Two access a brief two-page course overview developed by the College Board, visit http://media.collegeboard.com/digitalServices/pdf/ap/ap-course-overviews/ap-calculus-bc-course-overview.pdf. If interested in the Advanced Placement credit policy at a particular college or university, then please visit https://apstudent.collegeboard.org/creditandplacement/search-credit-policies. ADVANCED PLACEMENT STATISTICS The purpose of the AP course in statistics is to introduce students to the major concepts and tools for collecting, analyzing, and drawing conclusions from data. Preparation for the Advanced Placement Statistics examination is included. Students are exposed to four broad conceptual themes including: Exploring Data: Observing patterns and departures from patterns Planning a Study: Deciding what and how to measure Anticipating Patterns: Producing models using probability theory and simulation Statistical Inference: Confirming models *A graphing calculator is required for this course. Semesters: 2 Prerequisite: Pre-Calculus or teacher recommendation Level: 10, 11, 12 back to index 133 https://sites.google.com/a/d155.org/clsapcourses/stemhttp://media.collegeboard.com/digitalServices/pdf/ap/ap-course-overviews/ap-calculus-bc-course-overview.pdfhttp://media.collegeboard.com/digitalServices/pdf/ap/ap-course-overviews/ap-calculus-bc-course-overview.pdfhttps://apstudent.collegeboard.org/creditandplacement/search-credit-policiesCredit: 1/2 per semester Taxonomy: 397/398 Additional Information: Fees may not cover all expenses including the cost of the AP exam. To learn more about this course from a CHSD 155, visit https://sites.google.com/a/d155.org/clsapcourses/stem. To access a brief two-page course overview developed by the College Board, please visit http://media.collegeboard.com/digitalServices/pdf/ap/ap-course-overviews/ap-statistics-course-overview.pdf. If interested in the Advanced Placement credit policy at a particular college or university, then please visit https://apstudent.collegeboard.org/creditandplacement/search-credit-policies. _______________________ SCIENCE COURSE SEQUENCE back to index 134 https://sites.google.com/a/d155.org/clsapcourses/stemhttp://media.collegeboard.com/digitalServices/pdf/ap/ap-course-overviews/ap-statistics-course-overview.pdfhttp://media.collegeboard.com/digitalServices/pdf/ap/ap-course-overviews/ap-statistics-course-overview.pdfhttps://apstudent.collegeboard.org/creditandplacement/search-credit-policies_______________________ back to index 135 SCIENCE This science curriculum consists of a variety of laboratory courses for students of all abilities. Students are encouraged to participate in four years of science. The most typical sequence begins in 9th grade with Biology, continues with Chemistry in 10th grade, and Physics in 11th grade. Students high school experience concludes in 12th grade with an assortment of engaging and challenging senior electives; details regarding these options are included in this section of the course selection guide. Students entering grade 9 are placed in science courses based upon criteria including their performance on the EXPLORE test, classroom performance in 8th grade and recommendations of teachers and division leaders. Depending on subsequent interest and achievement, students can proceed through various combinations of other science courses. Honors level courses are available at all levels for students with exceptional motivation, ability and interest. Advanced Placement (AP) courses are also available to students in grades 11 and 12. Students that successfully complete AP courses and perform well on the AP exams, may earn credits and/or course exemptions at many colleges and universities. Basic Level BIOLOGY This course covers high school biology concepts in a format that is easy to understand and comprehend. This course is designed to develop an interest in biology, develop basic skills in biology including laboratory skills, and to improve critical thinking. An emphasis is made to apply the study of biology to students everyday world, making it back to index 136 real, relevant, and interesting. Current issues and careers in biology will be discussed. The reading level is lower than for Biology 309-310. Semesters: 2 Prerequisite: Teacher recommendation Level: 10, 11, 12 Periods: 5 per week Credit: 1/2 per semester Taxonomy: 303/304 BASIC EARTH AND SPACE SCIENCE This is a course designed for students that desire a science course but are not yet ready to take physics or chemistry. Basic Earth and Space Science will study the processes and forces behind plate tectonics, volcanism, earthquakes, weathering, erosion, and how these impact humans and society This course will also study geological time, the cosmos, stars, constellations, our solar system, and the relationship between the sun, earth, and moon. PHYSICAL SCIENCE This is a course designed for upperclassmen that desire a science course but are not yet ready to take physics or chemistry. Scientific knowledge is acquired through student experimentation. Emphasis is on applications of science to everyday life. The reading level for this course is lower than for Chemistry 311-312 and Physics 313-314. Semesters: 2 Prerequisite: Teacher recommendation Level: 11, (12 with teacher recommendation) Periods: 5 per week Credit: l/2 per semester Taxonomy: 305/306 General Level BIOLOGY back to index 137 This science class studies the properties of living things and the role organisms play in science and technology. Students investigate societal questions in a combination of teacher directed presentations, and laboratory investigations. The lab uses the methods of science to help students better understand the concepts being taught. Semesters: 2 Prerequisite: Teacher recommendation Level: 9 (with teacher recommendation or placement test), 10, 11, 12 Periods: 7 per week Credit: l/2 per semester Taxonomy: 309/310 CHEMISTRY This is a course which involves the student with materials and methods of chemistry. The classroom activities are centered around laboratory investigations, lectures, and demonstrations. The course provides a solid foundation in the fundamentals of chemistry which could lead to further study in the sciences. Semesters: 2 Prerequisite: Algebra Level: 10 (with teacher recommendation), 11, 12 Periods: 7 per week Credit: l/2 per semester Taxonomy: 311/312 PHYSICS Laboratory work and other course work in Physics investigates physical phenomena in the universe around us. Areas of investigation are: measurement, motion, force, gravitation, energy, heat, light, electricity, magnetism and the atom. The approach is somewhat less math oriented than AP Physics I. The emphasis is one which will provide the necessary background for success at the college level, but not too advanced for the non-science major. Semesters: 2 back to index 138 Prerequisite: Algebra Level: 11 or 12 Periods: 7 per week Credit: l/2 per semester Taxonomy: 313/314 SCIENCE AND SOCIETY The rapid growth in scientific knowledge has led to many new technologies that are at the center of many current issues we face as a society. Our political and social leaders in various public forums are addressing many of these issues. This course may explore some of these current topics: Breakthroughs in medical technology Environmental controversies Robotic applications in medicine and law enforcement Changes or threats to national energy supply Military and security issues Since Science and Society is a semester-long course, students enrolled in it typically participate in Forensics during the other portion of the school year. Semesters: 1 Prerequisite: Teacher recommendation Level: 12 Periods: 5 per week Credit: 1/2 per semester Taxonomy: 317/318 FORENSICS Forensics is an elective course offered to seniors who have completed Chemistry or Physical Science. Using field-based techniques, students will collect, process, and analyze evidence from multiple scientific domains to solve crime scene scenarios. Students will present their findings and defend conclusions drawn from their investigations. Students will work together as a team to solve problems. Since Forensics is a semester-long course, students enrolled in it typically participate in Science and Society during the other portion of the school year. Students enrolled in this course may be subject to graphic material that is associated with realistic or common crime scene scenarios. This information will not be shared with back to index 139 the students for sensational purposes; rather as an opportunity for students to apply newly learned skills and knowledge, gain a realistic understanding of what a career in forensic science could entail, as well as utilize resources associated with the forensics profession in an authentic manner. The teacher will present information professionally and with an academic focus. Similarly, students are expected to engage in the coursework in a mature and studious manner. Activities that require private information such as fingerprinting will be completed in a confidential manner and any and all private student information will be returned to the student (i.e., teachers will not keep this type of information on file after the assignment has been graded and returned). If the student or parent has any questions about the curriculum or activities associated with this course, they are encouraged to contact the instructor or STEM divisional leader to seek clarification and understanding. If you suspect your child may be sensitive to this type of material despite the teachers efforts to present it respectfully, then he/she is encouraged to discuss matters with the instructor more fully and if necessary, reconsider taking the course. Semesters: 1 Prerequisite: Successful completion of Chemistry or Physical Science. Level: 12 Periods: 5 per week Credit: 1/2 per semester Taxonomy: 339/340 EARTH & SPACE SCIENCE Earth and Space Science will study the processes and forces behind the plate tectonic theory, volcanism, earthquakes, mountain building, weathering, erosion, and how these impact humans. This course will also study the cosmos, stars, constellations, solar system, and the sun-earth-moon relationships. Semesters: 2 Prerequisite: Level: 12 Periods: 5 per week Credit: 1/2 per semester Taxonomy: 337/338 back to index 140 Honors Level HONORS BIOLOGY This course is designed for students with high interest and ability in science, covering certain fundamental areas of biology in greater depth than covered in Biology 309-310 course while leading toward the Advanced Placement Program. During the year strong emphasis is given to laboratory activity. As the course proceeds, the student becomes more and more aware of the methods of science as well as the principles that govern life. Semesters: 2 Prerequisite: Placement tests or teacher recommendation. Level: 9 (10 with teacher recommendation) Periods: 7 per week Credit: 1/2 per semester Level: 9 (10 with teacher recommendation) Taxonomy: 319/320 HONORS CHEMISTRY This is a course in the study of the composition of matter and the changes that occur. The course concepts are based upon qualitative and quantitative laboratory investigations. Enhancement of critical thinking and problem solving skills is also an important phase of the course work. The subject material is directed toward students who expect to continue study in a science related field. Semesters: 2 Prerequisite: Algebra and teacher recommendation. Level: 10, 11, 12 Periods: 7 per week Credit: l/2 per semester Taxonomy: 321/322 HONORS SURVEY OF HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY This year-long course presents a systemic approach to the study of the human body. Essential principles of human anatomy and physiology are presented. This includes basic chemistry, cell and tissue studies, and an overview of all the body systems. Labs will include, but not be limited to, the use of anatomical models, microscopes, and the dissection of animals and their organs. back to index 141 Semesters: 2 Prerequisite: C or better in Bio 309, Bio 319, or teacher recommendation. Level: 12 Periods: 5 per week Credit: 1/2 per semester Taxonomy: 341/342 Advanced Placement Level ADVANCED PLACEMENT PHYSICS I In this course, Physics is presented as a process by which we seek to better understand the orderliness and predictability of the universe around us. The topics of mechanics (study of motion), optics (study of light and waves), and electricity/magnetism are the core curriculum of the course. Throughout the course there is a heavy emphasis on lab work, critical thinking, and problem solving. This course is designed for students with high abilities in science and mathematics. Semesters: 2 Prerequisite: Completion of Biology, Chemistry and Algebra II with Trigonometry (H) or Algebra II with Trig with a C or higher or teacher recommendation. Level: 11, 12 Periods: 7 per week Credit: l/2 per semester Taxonomy: 333/334 Additional Information: Fees may not cover all expenses including the cost of the AP exam. To view a brief two-page course description developed by the College Board, please visit https://secure-media.collegeboard.org/digitalServices/pdf/ap/ap_physics1_2page_course_overview.pdf To learn more about this course from a CHSD 155 teacher, visit https://sites.google.com/a/d155.org/clsapcourses/stem. back to index 142 https://secure-media.collegeboard.org/digitalServices/pdf/ap/ap_physics1_2page_course_overview.pdfhttps://secure-media.collegeboard.org/digitalServices/pdf/ap/ap_physics1_2page_course_overview.pdfhttps://sites.google.com/a/d155.org/clsapcourses/stemIf interested in the Advanced Placement credit policy at a particular college or university, then please visit https://apstudent.collegeboard.org/creditandplacement/search-credit-policies. ADVANCED PLACEMENT BIOLOGY This is a college level accelerated science course offered to those students who have successfully completed a year of biology, chemistry, and physics. In special cases co-enrollment in physics is permitted. The course emphasizes the biochemical and evolutionary similarities and differences among living organisms and methods of their continuance. Text and laboratory materials are freshman college level. Lab work is extensive and may require the student to participate in lab beyond the scheduled lab periods. The students may receive college credit and/or placement in biology upon successfully completing this course and taking a placement exam. Semesters: 2 Prerequisite: Biology, Chemistry or Division Leader recommendation. Level: 11, 12 Periods: 10 per week Credit: 1/2 per semester Taxonomy: 325/326 Additional Information: Fees may not cover all expenses including the cost of the AP exam. To view a brief two-page course overview developed by the College Board, please visit http://media.collegeboard.com/digitalServices/pdf/ap/13b-7589-AP-Biology-ADA-v0.1.pdf To learn more about this course from a CHSD 155 teacher, visit https://sites.google.com/a/d155.org/clsapcourses/stem. If interested in the Advanced Placement credit policy at a particular college or university, then please visit https://apstudent.collegeboard.org/creditandplacement/search-credit-policies. ADVANCED PLACEMENT CHEMISTRY back to index 143 https://apstudent.collegeboard.org/creditandplacement/search-credit-policieshttp://media.collegeboard.com/digitalServices/pdf/ap/13b-7589-AP-Biology-ADA-v0.1.pdfhttp://media.collegeboard.com/digitalServices/pdf/ap/13b-7589-AP-Biology-ADA-v0.1.pdfhttps://sites.google.com/a/d155.org/clsapcourses/stemhttps://apstudent.collegeboard.org/creditandplacement/search-credit-policiesThis is a college level accelerated science course offered to those students who have successfully completed a year of biology, chemistry, and physics. In special cases co-enrollment in physics is permitted. The course is designed to be a survey of chemistry comparable to a typical college freshman course in scope and depth. Emphasis is placed on problem solving and quantitative skills in both laboratory and classroom phases. The students may receive college credit and/or advanced placement in chemistry upon successfully completing this course and taking a placement exam. Semesters: 2 Prerequisite: Biology, Chemistry or Division Leader recommendation. Level: 11, 12 Periods: 10 per week Credit: 1/2 per semester Taxonomy: 327/328 Additional Information: Fees may not cover all expenses including the cost of the AP exam. To view a brief two-page course overview developed by the College Board, please visit http://media.collegeboard.com/digitalServices/pdf/ap/ap-course-overviews/ap-chemistry-course-overview.pdf To learn more about these courses from a CHSD 155 teacher, visit https://sites.google.com/a/d155.org/clsapcourses/stem. If interested in the Advanced Placement credit policy at a particular college or university, then please visit https://apstudent.collegeboard.org/creditandplacement/search-credit-policies. ADVANCED PLACEMENT PHYSICS C This is a college level calculus based science course for those who have successfully completed chemistry and are considering a major in an engineering field. The course covers topics including, but not limited to linear and circular mechanics and dynamics during one semester, and topics of electricity and magnetism during the other. Emphasis is placed on lab work, critical thinking and problem solving through high level mathematics. Each semester prepares students for a separate AP exam, each worth a potential semester of college credit. Semesters: 2 back to index 144 http://media.collegeboard.com/digitalServices/pdf/ap/ap-course-overviews/ap-chemistry-course-overview.pdfhttp://media.collegeboard.com/digitalServices/pdf/ap/ap-course-overviews/ap-chemistry-course-overview.pdfhttps://sites.google.com/a/d155.org/clsapcourses/stemhttps://apstudent.collegeboard.org/creditandplacement/search-credit-policiesPrerequisite: Juniors must complete Biology and Chemistry and have concurrent enrollment in AP Calculus BC. Seniors must complete Biology, Chemistry and Physics or an AP-level science course and have concurrent enrollment or completion of Calculus. Level: 11, 12 Periods: 10 per week Credit: 1/2 per semester Taxonomy: 335/336 Additional Information: Fees may not cover all expenses including the cost of the AP exam. To learn more about this course from a CHSD 155 teacher, visit https://sites.google.com/a/d155.org/clsapcourses/stem. To access a brief two-page course description developed by the College Board, please visit http://media.collegeboard.com/digitalServices/pdf/ap/ap-course-overviews/ap-physics-c-mechanics-course-overview.pdf If interested in the Advanced Placement credit policy at a particular college or university, then please visit https://apstudent.collegeboard.org/creditandplacement/search-credit-policies. ADVANCED PLACEMENT ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE The College Board explains, The goal of the AP Environmental Science course is to provide students with the scientific principles, concepts, and methodologies required to understand the interrelationships of the natural world, to identify and analyze environmental problems both natural and human-made, to evaluate the relative risks associated with these problems, and to examine alternative solutions for resolving or preventing them. An additional goal of the course is to prepare students for the AP Environmental Science exam. Semesters: 2 Prerequisite: Approval from the STEM division leader. Level: 12 Periods: 7 per week Credit: 1/2 per semester Taxonomy: 343/344 back to index 145 https://sites.google.com/a/d155.org/clsapcourses/stemhttp://media.collegeboard.com/digitalServices/pdf/ap/ap-course-overviews/ap-physics-c-mechanics-course-overview.pdfhttp://media.collegeboard.com/digitalServices/pdf/ap/ap-course-overviews/ap-physics-c-mechanics-course-overview.pdfhttps://apstudent.collegeboard.org/creditandplacement/search-credit-policies Additional Information: Fees may not cover all expenses including the cost of the AP exam. To access a brief two-page course overview developed by the College Board, please visit https://secure-media.collegeboard.org/digitalServices/pdf/ap/ap-course-overviews/ap-environmental-science-course-overview.pdf. If interested in the Advanced Placement credit policy at a particular college or university, then please visit https://apstudent.collegeboard.org/creditandplacement/search-credit-policies. back to index 146 https://secure-media.collegeboard.org/digitalServices/pdf/ap/ap-course-overviews/ap-environmental-science-course-overview.pdfhttps://secure-media.collegeboard.org/digitalServices/pdf/ap/ap-course-overviews/ap-environmental-science-course-overview.pdfhttps://apstudent.collegeboard.org/creditandplacement/search-credit-policies_______________________ WELLNESS back to index 147 _______________________ DRIVER EDUCATION The goal of Driver Education in the high school is the development of traffic citizens who will be competent and responsible users of the highway transportation system. Driver Education is a two-phase program: classroom (which is required for graduation) and behind the wheel. The behind the wheel phase is not required, but is offered to any student who desires to take this phase of the program. The classroom work stresses safety and attitudes for safe driving. A student must have a minimum of 30 clock hours to receive credit. The behind the wheel phase teaches safety and competent driving practices in actual on the street situations. A student must have 6 clock hours in order to receive credit. Students who take the classroom phase previous to the behind the wheel phase should plan to finish both parts within one year. Note: Students must be 15 years of age to obtain a drivers permit. Where there is a limitation created by a lack of facilities or staff, enrollment priority is established based on the age of the student. A student may have to wait until the semester they turn 16 in order to enroll for the course. Driver education is also offered in the summer session. Classroom Semesters: 3 periods per week Prerequisite: 15 years of age; pass 8 classes in the previous two semesters Credit: 1/4 Taxonomy: 601/602 Behind the Wheel Semesters: 1-2 periods per week Prerequisite: 15 years of age; pass 8 classes in the previous two semesters back to index 148 Credit: None State of IL requirements to obtain permit Taxonomy: 603/604 back to index 149 _______________________ HEALTH EDUCATION HEALTH Curriculum content is intended to provide the principles and guidelines of mental health, human growth and development, drug use and abuse, human sexuality, personal health habits and dental hygiene, nutrition, diet and exercise, consumer health and health careers, prevention and control of diseases, human ecology and environmental health, first aid and disaster survival. This course is required for graduation. Semesters: 1 Level: 10 Credit: 1/2 Taxonomy: 709/710 back to index 150 _______________________ PHYSICAL EDUCATION Physical Education offer students a unique opportunity to develop physically, emotionally, mentally, and socially. Physical Education is required of all students for four years. Students will be assessed each year on fitness related concepts including the pacer test, push ups, planks, and the sit and reach. Curriculum will focus on the health related fitness components of muscular strength, muscular endurance, flexibility, and cardiovascular fitness. FRESHMAN BLOCK FRESHMAN COED This course introduces the cognitive and mechanical concepts of team, individual, and fitness activities. The concepts of fitness testing and weights are also introduced. Semesters: 2 Level: 9 Credit: 1/4 Taxonomy: 713/714 back to index 151 SOPHOMORE/JUNIOR/SENIOR BLOCK The following courses apply the concepts learned in Freshman CoEd. Students select one course each semester and they may participate in the same course more than once (excluding Health Education). All students are required to take one semester of Health during their sophomore year. SOPHOMORE/JUNIOR/SENIOR COED This coed course will offer a variety of individual and team sports. The students will engage in sports such as basketball, volleyball, tennis, softball, badminton, pickleball, team handball, soccer and other fitness related activities. Students will also be assessed each semester on their physical fitness level be participating in tests related to muscular strength, muscular endurance, flexibility and cardiovascular endurance. Semesters: 1 Level: 10, 11, 12 Credit: 1/4 Taxonomy: 725/726 STRENGTH AND CONDITIONING (formerly known as Weights and Conditioning) This coed course offers a combination of weight lifting and varied conditioning activities. Students will be able to design and implement a personalized resistance training program. Semesters: 1 Level: 10, 11, 12 Credit: 1/4 Taxonomy: 729/730 ADVANCED STRENGTH AND CONDITIONING This coed course offers students an opportunity to build upon their successful experiences with the Strength and Conditioning course and apply their knowledge and skills towards individualized fitness goals. Class topics include performance of a variety of exercises in the weight room and individualized programming based upon fitness goals. Students will also be tested on various movements throughout the semester. Throughout this course, students will use a combination of weight lifting and varied conditioning activities. back to index 152 Semesters: 1 Prerequisites: B or better in Strength and Conditioning and approval from the division leader. Level: 10, 11, 12 Credit: 1/4 Taxonomy: 745/746 TOTAL BODY FITNESS This course offers a personal fitness approach to physical education. Students will be exposed to variety of activities and topics including: circuit training, aerobics, strength training & toning, yoga, pilates, stress management, and nutrition. Students will be taught and encouraged to include mindful wellness practices to their daily lives to help improve their health and wellness. Semesters: 1 Level: 11, 12 Credit: 1/4 Taxonomy: 735/736 ORCHESIS This course is a dance fitness class that anyone can take with no skill required. The course provides the opportunity to learn, create, and utilize dance as a form of fitness. You will learn a variety of dances and at the end of the semester you will perform in a themed evening dance show. Fitness is also a focus, so there will be various opportunities to instill new ideas for workouts. This course creates great memories, new friends, and meaningful fitness. Semesters: 1 Level: 10, 11, 12 Credit: 1/4 Taxonomy: 737/738 LEADERSHIP IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION This course focuses on developing students leadership skills through opportunities presented in physical education class. Students enrolled will learn to assist the instructor in leading games, explaining rules, officiating, and teaching strategies associated with a variety of athletic and sport activities. back to index 153 Semesters: 1 Prerequisites: Must be junior status and have a recommendation from a physical education teacher. Level: 11 Credit: 1/4 unit Taxonomy: 741/742 OFF CAMPUS PHYSICAL EDUCATION This coed course offers opportunities not available on campus. Representative activities include: swimming, boating, golf, bowling, and ice skating. Fees are required. The class meets five periods per week: double periods two days a week and a single period one day a week. Semesters: 1 Prerequisites: C average in other PE classes and approval of the division leader. Level: 11, 12 Credit: 1/4 Taxonomy: 721/722 WALKING FOR FITNESS This coed course is designed to teach and apply the principles of lifetime physical fitness, utilizing components such as cardio-respiratory endurance, muscular strength, muscular endurance, flexibility and body composition. A variety of health and wellness issues will be addressed. The components of fitness will be met through structured individually paced fitness walking techniques and strength conditioning exercises. Semesters: 1 Prerequisites: Approval of the division leader. Level: 10, 11, 12 Credit: 1/4 Taxonomy: 743/744 ADAPTIVE PHYSICAL EDUCATION This coed course is designed to meet the individualized needs of participants. Semesters: 1 Prerequisite: Physician referral and the recommendation/approval of the division leader is required. Level: 9, 10, 11, and 12 back to index 154 Credit: 1/4 Taxonomy: 711/712 back to index 155

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