Critical Thinking - We Critical Thinking Skills Critical thinking can be divided up into three main

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Text of Critical Thinking - We Critical Thinking Skills Critical thinking can be divided up into three main

  • Critical Thinking

  • What Is Critical Thinking? • Critical thinking means making

    reasoned judgements that are logical and well thought out.

    • It is a way of thinking in which you don’t simply accept all arguments and conclusions you are presented with, but rather question them.

  • What Is Critical Thinking? • A critical thinker will ask:

    • Is that really true?

    • How do you know?

    • Show me the evidence.

    • Is that evidence reliable?

  • Things You Didn’t Know You Didn’t Know https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3GU2kPl57JQ

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3GU2kPl57JQ

  • Critical Thinking Skills Critical thinking can be divided up into three main skills:

    1. Curiosity – the desire to learn more information, seek evidence, and be open to new ideas.

    2. Skepticism – having a healthy questioning attitude about new information and not blindly believing everything everyone tells you.

    3. Humility – the ability to admit that your ideas are wrong when faces with new convincing evidence that states otherwise.

  • Using Critical Thinking Skills Many people make decisions in their daily lives based on anecdotes, or stories from one person’s experience.

  • Using Critical Thinking Skills Example:

    • Your aunt told you that she takes vitamin C supplements every day. One morning she was running late for work and forgot to take them. That afternoon, she developed a cold. She now insists that you take vitamin C every day or you will get sick, just like she did in her story.

  • Using Critical Thinking Skills Many people hearing this story would just accept this and think, “To avoid getting sick, I should take vitamin C.”

    Although this logic is common, it lacks critical thinking skills. • Where does the idea of vitamin C stopping illness come from?

    • Why did your aunt take vitamin C instead of vitamin D or any other vitamin?

    • Maybe your aunt was already developing a cold and it just happened to get manifest itself that day.

    • Maybe she shook hands with someone who had a cold.

  • Why Is Critical Thinking Important? • Helps with intellectual self

    improvement

    • Allows you to become a better team player

    • Improves creativity

    • Helps you stay calm and rational under stress

    • Improves ability to make decisions

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1IDF-8khS3w

  • Critical Thinking Review Video https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HnJ1bqXUnIM

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HnJ1bqXUnIM

  • Critical Thinking: Cause and Effect • The concept of cause and effect (consequence) addresses who or

    what influenced events to occur and what the repercussions of those events were.

    Think about this:

    • What was the grade of your last big assignment or project in one of your classes?

    • What were the causes of this grade?

    • Which cause was immediate and which one was underlying?

  • • Think beyond these simple factors: • How much time did you have to study? • Did you leave the essay until the last minute?

    • Consider other factors: • Health issues, social environment, physical environment, etc. *Think outside the box for determining factors

    • Underlying causes are usually more important or serious than immediate causes.

    Critical Thinking: Cause and Effect

  • Critical Thinking: Cause and Effect • The concept of cause and effect (consequence) addresses who or

    what influenced events to occur and what the repercussions of those events were.

    Think about this:

    • What were the effects or consequences of this grade?

    • How big were the consequences?

    • How long will you feel the impact of this consequence?

  • The Importance of Causes When faced with an issue or problem, why is it important to look for the causes? Causes help provide evidence to support a claim:

    • Evidence of causal connection: ➢ Is the cause clearly connected with the event or is it coincidence? If this factor

    (people or beliefs) were removed, would this event still take place?

    • Degree of influence: ➢To what degree did the cause contribute to the event?

    • Absence of alternative explanation: ➢Could some other factor explain what happened?

  • The Importance of Consequence • Depth of impact: How deeply felt

    or profound was the consequence? • (deep)

    • Breadth of impact: How widespread was this felt? • (size - small or great?)

    • Duration of impact: How long- lasting was the consequence? • (time)