Critical teacher education and multicultural issues

  • Published on
    20-Mar-2017

  • View
    212

  • Download
    0

Transcript

  • This article was downloaded by: [Universitaetsbibliothek Giessen]On: 15 November 2014, At: 04:05Publisher: RoutledgeInforma Ltd Registered in England and Wales Registered Number: 1072954Registered office: Mortimer House, 37-41 Mortimer Street, London W1T 3JH, UK

    Journal of Education PolicyPublication details, including instructions for authors andsubscription information:http://www.tandfonline.com/loi/tedp20

    Critical teacher education andmulticultural issuesKip Tellez & JoAnne SchickPublished online: 09 Jul 2006.

    To cite this article: Kip Tellez & JoAnne Schick (1993) Critical teacher educationand multicultural issues, Journal of Education Policy, 8:5, 165-167, DOI:10.1080/0268093930080514

    To link to this article: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/0268093930080514

    PLEASE SCROLL DOWN FOR ARTICLE

    Taylor & Francis makes every effort to ensure the accuracy of all the information(the Content) contained in the publications on our platform. However, Taylor& Francis, our agents, and our licensors make no representations or warrantieswhatsoever as to the accuracy, completeness, or suitability for any purposeof the Content. Any opinions and views expressed in this publication are theopinions and views of the authors, and are not the views of or endorsed byTaylor & Francis. The accuracy of the Content should not be relied upon andshould be independently verified with primary sources of information. Taylor andFrancis shall not be liable for any losses, actions, claims, proceedings, demands,costs, expenses, damages, and other liabilities whatsoever or howsoever causedarising directly or indirectly in connection with, in relation to or arising out of theuse of the Content.

    This article may be used for research, teaching, and private study purposes.Any substantial or systematic reproduction, redistribution, reselling, loan, sub-licensing, systematic supply, or distribution in any form to anyone is expresslyforbidden. Terms & Conditions of access and use can be found at http://www.tandfonline.com/page/terms-and-conditions

    http://www.tandfonline.com/loi/tedp20http://www.tandfonline.com/action/showCitFormats?doi=10.1080/0268093930080514http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/0268093930080514http://www.tandfonline.com/page/terms-and-conditionshttp://www.tandfonline.com/page/terms-and-conditions

  • POLITICS OF EDUCATION ASSOCIATION YEARBOOK, 1993, 165-167

    Critical teacher education and multicultural issues

    Kip Tellez and Jo-Anne Schick

    As we see it, the University of Washington (UW) program serves as a vanguard forinterprofessional collaboration, but there are two features of professional practice notaddressed in the UW program that we would like to explore. First, because we are teachereducators, we view interprofessional practice through a lens that focuses on teacherpreparation. Consequently, we find ourselves unsure about how interprofessional trainingcan be implemented in universities where teacher education is limited (often by statelawmakers) in both length and scope, and very often takes place far from or with littleconcern for urban areas where interprofessional collaboration is needed (Scribner 1985).

    Second, multicultural considerations must take center stage when considering inter-professional preparation. We hear few calls for integrated social services in upper class,white neighborhoods. This point is crucial when considering the development of broadlytrained professionals.

    Teacher education

    When considering the interprofessional training of teachers, a number of issues arise: (a)nearly 40% of all teachers receive their certification from a nondoctoral grantinginstitution where teacher certification may be the only profession program on campus(American Association of Colleges for Teacher Education 1991), (b) teacher certification ismost often an undergraduate degree program with limited credit hours (AmericanAssociation of Colleges for Teacher Education 1991), (c) newly certified teachers show astrong preference for suburban teaching (American Association of Colleges for TeacherEducation 1987), and (d) there is a growing belief that school district-sponsored alternativecertification programs are more effective than university training (Haberman 1992). Wequestion how widely interprofessional programs can be implemented (at least in the UWfashion) when the host institution has no social work, nursing, or public health program,when beginning teachers prefer to work in suburban schools, or when teachers are noteven certified through a university. Even a university where professional programs areweak or understaffed may have trouble with a collaborative program.

    While the University of Houston (UH) does have a full range of professionalprograms, we have recently implemented a program that may serve to educate teachers indisciplines beyond education without necessarily involving other disciplines (Tellez andHlebowitsh in press). As part of a culture study requirement, preservice teacher educationstudents volunteer in social service agencies across the city. Several of our students, forinstance, work a minimum of 20 hours in a battered women's shelter, tutoring thechildren of the women who live there. In their work, they are exposed not only to thesocial conditions which precipitate violence against women but they also work closely

    0268-0939/93 $10.00 1993 Taylor & Francis Ltd.

    Dow

    nloa

    ded

    by [

    Uni

    vers

    itaet

    sbib

    lioth

    ek G

    iess

    en]

    at 0

    4:05

    15

    Nov

    embe

    r 20

    14

  • 166 KIP TELLEZ AND JO-ANNE SCHICK

    with the social workers assigned to the facility. Several other students volunteer in hospitalprograms, helping to tutor young patients who are confined to critical care facilities.

    At the completion of their volunteer assignment, we ask students to write a paper,addressing questions such as, 'What did you learn in your volunteer assignment that willmake you a better teacher?' and 'Would schools be different if all teachers could have seenwhat you did?'. Their responses never fail to overwhelm us. Classroom discussions withour prospective teachers reveal deep and indelible insights into the socioeducational worldof urban students. The volunteer assignment has at least one more advantage. Because theTexas state legislature has restricted professional teacher education courses to 18 credithours, we cannot offer additional courses. The volunteer assignment fits within the spaceof our constricted program.

    The success of our experiences with the volunteer assignment leads us to believe thatother teacher education programs, especially those that cannot create an interdisciplinaryprogram, may benefit from a volunteer program. However, universities located far fromthe urban world, where preservice teachers may not be able to work in a broad range ofprograms, may not be able to provide such an experience. In general, we argue thatteacher preparation must be a priority at comprehensive, rigorous urban universities.

    Multicultural issues

    The UW group report suggests that they faced considerable difficulties in establishing theirprogram at an ethnically mixed inner city school where a confusing patchwork of socialservices operated largely independently. This is the type of environment where inter-professional practice is needed most. A recent interprofessional project in Houstonconvinced us that multicultural issues are central when considering interprofessionalcollaboration in such settings.

    At the University of Houston, we have recently faced the problems of providinginterprofessional services. In the spring of 1992, several faculty members and their studentsfrom the University of Houston joined with faculty and students from three otherinstitutions of higher learning in the Houston area to collaborate on the problems evidentin a near-urban section of the city. There were already several community-based groupsactive in this area, and it had been chosen as a focus of study due to its dense population,high crime rate, and insufficient health and social service facilities. The population of thearea is predominantly immigrant and of low income.

    The effort was coordinated by a faculty member with a dual appointment at theUniversity of Houston (UH) and at Rice University. The success of the collaboration waslargely due to the tireless efforts of this coordinator who kept in constant contact with allfaculty and community representatives, as well as directing his urban design team andfinally ensuring the publication of all relevant reports. The study focused on the followingareas: social conditions, education, health care, transportation, community organization,and urban design.

    The stated mission for the project was the improvement of the quality of life in thatcommunity. Unlike the UW program, faculty members and students focused initially onproblems within their particular area of expertise. For example, students within thePrinciples of Curriculum Design in Second Language Education worked in groups todevelop effective programs to meet the needs of learners of English as a second language(ESL) enrolled in elementary, secondary, and continuing education (adult) programs in thearea. Students and faculty members from all disciplines met a total of four times

    Dow

    nloa

    ded

    by [

    Uni

    vers

    itaet

    sbib

    lioth

    ek G

    iess

    en]

    at 0

    4:05

    15

    Nov

    embe

    r 20

    14

  • CRITICAL TEACHER EDUCATION AND MULTICULTURAL ISSUES 167

    throughout the semester on Saturday mornings in order to give progress reports to otherproject members. It was during these meetings that students and faculty from differentdisciplines gave important feedback to participants in other fields of study. For example, atone meeting it was suggested that the project had insufficient representation from thecommunity, in particular from minority residents. As a result, students from the Collegeof Social Work organized a cultural awareness workshop at which speakers from theLatino, African-American, and Vietnamese communities expressed their concerns. Duringthese meetings, we noticed that the first true collaboration occurred among the variousparticipants and disciplines. The result of the conversations with the community was therealization by all participants that the culture of those being 'served' must be ofparamount importance. Perhaps students participating in interprofessional collaborationmight benefit from early examinations of the race and class issues.

    Conclusion

    We hope that teacher educators and other professional program faculty will considerdeeply the implementation and consequences of interprofessional collaboration. Too oftenin teacher preparation we are inclined to alter our existing programs with little evidence tosuggest that the old way is not working or that the new way works better. We are notsuggesting an overly instrumentalist view of programmatic changes, but evidence thatteachers and other professionals are able to do their jobs better as a result of a collaborativetraining program is necessary for any change. It appears to us that the UW program willbe providing the professional training community with that information, and we awaitthe results.

    References

    AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF COLLEGES FOR TEACHER EDUCATION (1987) Teaching Teachers: Facts and Figures

    (RATE I). (Washington, DC: Author).AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF COLLEGES FOR TEACHER EDUCATION (1991) Teaching Teachers: Facts and Figures

    (RATE IV). (Washington, DC: Author).HABERMAN, M. (1992) 'Alternative certification: can the problems of urban education be resolved by

    traditional teacher education', Teacher Education and Practice, 8(1), pp. 13-28.SCRIBNER, J. D. (1985) 'Colleges of education in urban universities', in C. W. Case and W. A. Matthes (eds)

    Colleges of Education: Perspectives on Their Future (Berkeley, CA: McCutchan), pp. 51-70.TELLEZ, K. and HLEBOWITSH, P. S. (in press). 'Being there: social service and teacher preparation at the

    University of Houston', Innovative Higher Education.

    Dow

    nloa

    ded

    by [

    Uni

    vers

    itaet

    sbib

    lioth

    ek G

    iess

    en]

    at 0

    4:05

    15

    Nov

    embe

    r 20

    14

Recommended

View more >