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Early Reading and Phonics Policy Rationale: We aim to teach high quality phonics to ensure the children have the best start possible in reading and writing. Phonics is the beginning of children’s body of knowledge, skills and understanding that are an essential part of learning to read and write. In order to read and understand texts children must learn to recognise/ decode, the words on the page. Good quality phonic teaching secures the skills of word recognition and decoding which allow children to read fluently. This will result in children being able to read for pleasure, then move onto children developing comprehension skills. These phonic skills need to be taught systematically. Children need to acquire secure and automatic decoding skills and progress from ‘learning to read’ to ‘reading to learn’ for purpose and pleasure. The principles and aims of the teaching, learning and delivery of phonics at Chesterton Primary School: The aim of this document is; To establish consistent practice, progression and continuity in the teaching and learning of phonics throughout the school; To differentiate phonics work according to the needs of pupils, so that all pupils are given sufficient challenge at a level at which they can experience success; To give children word work strategies that will enable them to become fluent readers and confident writers; To teach children specific strategies to help them remember tricky words. To ensure that the teaching of phonics is lively, interactive and investigative. To encourage children to apply their phonic skills in all curriculum areas. To provide access to a suitably differentiated and challenging curriculum; To promote opportunities for disadvantaged learners; To work in partnership with parents/carers to help them to promote their child’s learning and development; High Quality Phonics High quality phonics is most effective when: ! It is part of broad and rich curriculum that engages children in a range of activities and experiences to develop their speaking and listening skills and phonological awareness. ! It is multi-sensory, encompassing simultaneous visual, auditory and kinesthetic activities to engage core learning. ! It is systematic and follows a carefully planned programme which reinforces and builds on previous learning to secure children’s progress. ! Is taught discretely and daily at a brisk pace. ! There are opportunities to reinforce and apply acquired phonic knowledge and skills across the curriculum. ! Children’s progress in developing and applying their phonic knowledge is carefully assessed and monitored. Meeting the needs of all learners for the effective teaching, learning and delivery of phonics at Chesterton Primary School: We believe that provision for the teaching, learning and delivery of high-quality interactive phonics is vital and crucial for every learner.

CP Early Reading and Phonics Policy FINAL APRIL€¦ · Jolly Phonics Pupil Book 1- covers all the 42 letter sounds, with the Jolly Phonics action, letter formation, listening for

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  • Early Reading and Phonics Policy

    Rationale: We aim to teach high quality phonics to ensure the children have the best start possible in reading and writing. Phonics is the beginning of children’s body of knowledge, skills and understanding that are an essential part of learning to read and write. In order to read and understand texts children must learn to recognise/ decode, the words on the page. Good quality phonic teaching secures the skills of word recognition and decoding which allow children to read fluently. This will result in children being able to read for pleasure, then move onto children developing comprehension skills. These phonic skills need to be taught systematically. Children need to acquire secure and automatic decoding skills and progress from ‘learning to read’ to ‘reading to learn’ for purpose and pleasure. The principles and aims of the teaching, learning and delivery of phonics at Chesterton Primary School: The aim of this document is;

    • To establish consistent practice, progression and continuity in the teaching and learning of phonics throughout the school;

    • To differentiate phonics work according to the needs of pupils, so that all pupils are given sufficient challenge at a level at which they can experience success;

    • To give children word work strategies that will enable them to become fluent readers and confident writers;

    • To teach children specific strategies to help them remember tricky words. • To ensure that the teaching of phonics is lively, interactive and investigative. • To encourage children to apply their phonic skills in all curriculum areas. • To provide access to a suitably differentiated and challenging curriculum; • To promote opportunities for disadvantaged learners; • To work in partnership with parents/carers to help them to promote their child’s learning and

    development; High Quality Phonics High quality phonics is most effective when:

    ! It is part of broad and rich curriculum that engages children in a range of activities and experiences to develop their speaking and listening skills and phonological awareness.

    ! It is multi-sensory, encompassing simultaneous visual, auditory and kinesthetic activities to engage core learning.

    ! It is systematic and follows a carefully planned programme which reinforces and builds on previous learning to secure children’s progress.

    ! Is taught discretely and daily at a brisk pace. ! There are opportunities to reinforce and apply acquired phonic knowledge and skills across the

    curriculum. ! Children’s progress in developing and applying their phonic knowledge is carefully assessed and

    monitored.

    Meeting the needs of all learners for the effective teaching, learning and delivery of phonics at Chesterton Primary School: We believe that provision for the teaching, learning and delivery of high-quality interactive phonics is vital and crucial for every learner.

  • Early Reading and Phonics Policy

    All phonics in Reception, KS1 and lower KS2 is taught following the ‘Jolly Phonics’ Programme. See Appendix for What is Jolly Phonics?, the Jolly Phonics Scope and Sequence and Jolly Phonics and the National Curriculum. We have adopted the suggested daily teaching sequence Introduction, Revisit and Review, Teach, Practice, Apply and Assess learning against criteria. Nursery and Prenursery follow Letters and Sounds Phase 1 Phonics which is delivered through well planned, engaging and interactive activities daily. Nursery follow this until the Summer Term where they are introduced to Jolly Phonics Action Songs and Sounds. From Reception to Year Two, children are ability grouped for phonics lessons to ensure that the learning is differentiated to meet their needs and optimum learning can occur. Ability grouping is mostly within the year group class, however, identified children are also grouped together across year groups if their needs cannot be met in their year group. Lower KS2 children are taught through targeted interventions. Teaching is multi-sensory, encompassing simultaneous visual, auditory and kinesthetic activities to enliven core learning. Phonics lessons will be 20-30 minutes long, taught daily, briskly paced sessions and then applied to reading and writing in a meaningful context. All activities are well matched to the children’s abilities and interests, and all classroom environments have an age appropriate display concentrating on both sounds and key words. At Chesterton Primary we provide ample opportunities to reinforce and apply acquired phonic knowledge and skills across the curriculum and in such activities as shared and guided reading and writing. Class teachers will have ultimate responsibility for assessment of the children in their class and tracking the progress of their children. EYFS: - Prenursery:

    ! Daily adult led speaking and listening activities. ! Daily rhythm and rhyme activities. ! Daily reading and story sessions for whole class and in small groups. ! Focus on Phase 1 Letters and Sounds. ! Continuous provision indoors and outdoors to support children in Phase 1 independently. ! We run a parent workshop, ’Letters & Sounds’ to support parents and carers at home with speaking

    and listening activities linked with the letters and sounds document. Nursery:

    ! Daily adult led speaking and listening activities. ! Daily rhythm and rhyme activities. ! Daily reading and story sessions for whole class and in small groups. ! Focus on Phase 1 Letters and Sounds. ! Continuous provision indoors and outdoors to support children in Phase 1 independently. ! We run a parent workshop, ’Letters & Sounds’ to support parents and carers at home with speaking

    and listening activities linked with the letters and sounds document. ! Each nursery child is given a ‘Sound Book’ in the Autumn 1 Term – this contains activities that link to

    the child’s current learning and letters and sounds activities used in class which will be completed at home with parents.

    ! In the Summer Term the children will be introduced to the Jolly Phonics songs and actions ! Follow the Reading Progression for EYFS (see Appendix).

  • Early Reading and Phonics Policy

    Reception: - • Children start in Reception using the Jolly Phonics action songs and stories. The actions are used to

    increase the children’s confidence and prompt them whilst writing. • They are taught all 42 sounds (Groups 1 – 7) using the interactive ‘Jolly Phonics for the Whiteboard’

    programme. • The primary focus during the Reception year is to follow Jolly Phonics Pupil Book 1. This is the first

    book in the Jolly Phonics Pupil Books that cover all the five skills for reading and writing. Children are able to work through each book and complete a wide variety of engaging daily activities, which develop key literacy skills. The teacher is able to support and guide the children through the books with the Jolly Phonics Teacher’s Book. Jolly Phonics Pupil Book 1- covers all the 42 letter sounds, with the Jolly Phonics action, letter formation, listening for letter sounds in words, blending activities and the first set of tricky words.

    • Children to be reading and constructing simple sentences using dictation. • Follow the Reading Progression for EYFS (see Appendix). • Daily adult led speaking and listening activities. • Daily rhythm and rhyme activities. • Daily reading and story sessions for whole class and in small groups. • Continued provision indoors and outdoors to support children in the respective phase independently

    and to reinforce the sounds being learnt that day or that week. • Daily discrete phonics lessons every day for 20 minutes. • When teaching phonemes, adults ensure that children are also taught the correct formation of the

    grapheme. Is correct letter formation stressed at all times? • Children are taught whole class. The gaps in children’s sounds are identified through assessment and

    relevant are put into place to support the individual learner. • If applicable, fast-learning children from Nursery join children in Reception for phonics sessions. • Children are introduced to a canon of stories and rhymes that they hear and rehearse frequently and

    the continuous provision reinforces the stories and rhymes being learnt. • There are opportunities for shared reading in literacy sessions • Guided reading introduced in ability groups for pupils who are reading. • Introduce and send home Jolly Phonics Orange fully decodable readers. See Appendix for

    breakdown. • Follow agreed terms of vocabulary as outlined in the Jolly Phonics Teachers Handbook whilst

    undertaking phonic lessons and across the curriculum. Exceptions to these have been agreed by Chesterton Primary Staff. For example, the use of ‘hop over e’ a e in Jolly Phonics will be referred to as a split digraph and modelled with a joining curve a e.

    KS1: - The children are streamed according to their abilities, there are suitable and regular intervention groups for those experiencing difficulties. The incremental development of phonics skills are suitably linked to developing comprehension skills. See Appendix for Jolly Phonics Scope and sequence and Jolly Phonics and the National Curriculum. For those pupils who did not meet the expected standard in the phonics check in Year 1 receive sufficient and regular support to ensure they reach their target in Year 2. Fully decodable reading books will be matched according to the child’s phonic level using the Jolly Phonics Readers from Red Set Level 1 to Blue Set Level 4. See Appendix for full breakdown of each Level.

  • Early Reading and Phonics Policy

    Year 1: -

    • Children in Year 1 begin the year following the ‘Jolly Phonics Pupil Book 2’. This is the second book in the Jolly Phonics Pupil Books that cover all the five skills for reading and writing. Children are able to work through each book and complete a wide variety of engaging daily activities, which develop key literacy skills. The teacher is able to support and guide the children through the books with the Jolly Phonics Teacher’s Book. Jolly Phonics Pupil Book 2 – continues to build on the skills that the children have been taught in book 1. It introduces more tricky words, alternative letter sound spellings and basic sentence structure to encourage independent writing.

    ! Follow the Reading Progression for Year One (see Appendix). • Daily adult led speaking and listening activities. • Daily rhythm and rhyme activities. • Daily reading and story sessions for whole class and in small groups. • Daily discrete phonics lessons every day for 30 minutes. • Children are streamed according to their ability for direct phonic lessons. • Introduce the relevant Jolly Phonics decodable reading book from Red Set Level 1 to Blue Set Level

    4. • Follow agreed terms of vocabulary as outlined in the Jolly Phonics Teachers Handbook whilst

    undertaking phonic lessons and across the curriculum. Exceptions to these have been agreed by Chesterton Primary Staff. For example, the use of ‘hop over e’ a e in Jolly Phonics will be referred to as a split digraph and modelled with a joining curve a e.

    Year 2: - • Children in Year 2 follow the ‘Jolly Phonics Pupil Book 3’. This is the third book in the Jolly Phonics

    Pupil Books that cover all the five skills for reading and writing. Children are able to work through each book and complete a wide variety of engaging daily activities, which develop key literacy skills. The teacher is able to support and guide the children through the books with the Jolly Phonics Teacher’s Book. Jolly Phonics Pupil Book 3 – contains further activities to consolidate the learning in books 1 & 2, as well as new spelling patterns, tricky words plus short and long vowels.

    • Sounds that need to be recapped will be done when needed after being identified following assessment.

    • Assessment will identify learners who need more specific and targeted support. These will be delivered through well planned and timely interventions.

    • Follow the Reading Progression for Year Two (see Appendix). • Daily adult led speaking and listening activities. • Daily rhythm and rhyme activities. • Daily reading and story sessions for whole class and in small groups. • Daily discrete phonics lessons every day for 30 minutes. • Children are streamed according to their ability for direct phonic lessons. • Introduce the relevant Jolly Phonics decodable reading book from Red Set Level 1 to Blue Set Level

    4.

    • Follow agreed terms of vocabulary as outlined in the Jolly Phonics Teachers Handbook whilst undertaking phonic lessons and across the curriculum. Exceptions to these have been agreed by

  • Early Reading and Phonics Policy

    Chesterton Primary Staff. For example, the use of ‘hop over e’ a e in Jolly Phonics will be referred to as a split digraph and modelled with a joining curve a e.

    KS2: – Children who have not achieved by end of year 2 need to be taught this through intervention. Assessment Assessments will follow the phonics: assessment and tracking guidance (DFES 2009). All teachers will ensure:

    • that they are aware of individual children’s needs through formative assessments which will be kept in their phonic assessment file.

    • All teachers will formally assess their children’s progress at the beginning of, and end of, every term in order to inform their planning.

    • Jolly Phonics Reading Assessment will be used termly to scrutinise gaps in learning in order to tailor phonics lessons and where appropriate to support interventions through one-to-one Precision Teaching. See Glossary for full breakdown of the Jolly Phonics Reading Assessment.

    • Jolly Phonics Letter Sounds Assessment Test 1 and Test 2 used to assess gaps in learning in order for interventions to be used effectively.

    Assessments will assess the children’s:

    • Understanding of grapheme to phoneme correspondence including diagraphs/trigraphs. • Knowledge of reading and spelling tricky words and high frequency words. • At the end of year 1 the children will take the statutory National Phonic Screening Test.

    Children will move between phonics groups to ensure optimum progress is achieved. The school will continue to inform all parents of pupil progress via bi-annual parents consultation evenings, termly pupil progress, effort and achievement reports, annual reports, ad-hoc personalised meetings. To target individuals, personal meetings will be arranged between parents and the intervention teacher. This is to support parents so they can encourage and deliver necessary support at home. Evaluating current provision for Phonics at Chesterton Primary School: Learner achievements will be monitored and evaluated, initially by the class teacher and supporting adults but also in collaboration with the learners, parents/carers, subject leaders, phonics leader and the senior leadership team. Monitoring and assessment will be ongoing as a part of the whole school plan and timetable. Typically, this will involve:

    • Regular observations of learning and teaching with a particular focus of challenge through ‘Assessment while Learning’ and ‘Assessment for Learning’;

    • Random learning walks will evaluate the quality of the learning environment in relation to stimulating inquiry, investigation and challenge while also quality assuring that learning is judged to be at least consistently good or outstanding;

    • Planning scrutinies to monitor provision of ‘Quality First Teaching’ through personalised differentiation;

    • Work scrutinies will be used to cross-reference each learners progress as well as ensuring that the daily delivery of phonic sessions are fun, interactive and differentiated.

    • Learner conferences will be held to provide children with the opportunity to reflect on provision with a particular focus on pace, new learning, challenge, engagement, progress and achievement.

  • Early Reading and Phonics Policy

    All monitoring is recorded in writing on a termly evaluation sheet so that the quality of provision for phonics learners can be evaluated as an ongoing process. Achievement and progress is recorded electronically using the ‘in-house’ data spreadsheets every term. The data for each phonic group and year group is evaluated in relation to achievement and progress and discussed with class teachers during termly pupil progress meetings. Interventions are implemented where needed to ensure that every child reaches their full potential, especially in terms of outstanding progress, and ideally with outstanding achievement. Parent/carers are informed of progress through bi-annual face-to-face consultations or through timely progress reports. Transitioning learners at Chesterton Primary School:

    • Written and verbal information about learners is provided on transfer between classes at the end of every summer term;

    • Written and verbal information about learners is provided on transfer between schools/settings. • Information sharing through professional discussions and analysis of data between year groups prior

    to transitions. • Timely moderation throughout the year between EYFS; EYFS and Year 1; Year 1 and Year 2; Year2 and

    Year 3; Year 3 and 4; Year4 and 5; Year 5 and Year 6. Named Leader and Named Governor/s: The Phonics Leader for Chesterton Primary School is Mrs Vanessa Davenport. The governor/s who have responsibility for ensuring that Phonics learning is always on the agenda for learning, teaching and school leadership are Mr Roy Dutton Process for Development and Review: Chesterton Primary School has an action plan to support the implementation of this policy with clearly identified monitoring and evaluation opportunities. Our commitment to support the delivery, teaching and learning of Phonics is reflected in our School Development Plan. This policy and the success of the school’s provision for phonics will be reviewed annually by the Phonics Leader, Head teacher and the Link Governor. Phonics Leader: Mrs Vanessa Davenport Signed: V Davenport Chair of Governors: Mr Roy Dutton Signed: R Dutton Ratified by Governors Date: June 20 Date of Review: June 23

  • Early Reading and Phonics Policy

    Appendices What is Jolly Phonics? Jolly Phonics is a comprehensive programme, based on the proven, fun and muliti-sensory synthetic phonics method that gets children reading and writing from an early age. This means that we teach letter sounds as opposed to the alphabet. These 42 letter sounds are phonic building blocks that children, with the right tools, use to decode the English language. When reading a word, they recognise the letters and blend together the respective sounds; when writing a word they identify the sounds and write down the corresponding letters. These skills are called blending and segmenting. These are two of the five skills that children need to master phonics:

    1. Learning the letter sounds:

    Children are taught 42 letter sounds, which is a mix of alphabet sounds (1 sound – 1 letter) and digraphs (1 sound – 2 letters) such as sh, th, ai and ue. Using a multi-sensory approach each letter sound is introduced with fun actions, stories and songs. We teach the letter sounds in 7 groups of 6 letters at a pace of 4-5 sounds a week. Children can start reading after the first group of letters have been taught and should have been introduced to all the 42 letter sounds after 9 weeks at school.

    2. Learning letter formation: This is taught alongside the introduction of each letter sound. Typically, children will learn how to form and write the letters letter down during the course of the lesson.

  • Early Reading and Phonics Policy

    3. Blending: Once the first few letter sounds are learnt, children begin blending the sounds together to help them read and write new words.

    4. Segmenting: When children start reading words, they also need to start identifying the phonic components that make the word sound the way it does. By teaching blending and segmenting at the same time children become familiar with assembling and breaking down the sounds within words.

    5. Tricky words These are words with irregular parts, such as ‘who’ and ‘I’. Children learn these as exceptions to the rules of phonics. Introducing the common tricky words early in the year increases reading fluency (as they frequently occur in those first simple sentences you might expect them to read).

    Alongside these skills children are also introduced to the main alternative spelling of vowels. These five skills form the foundation that children build on with each year of grammar teaching. The programme continues throughout the school years, by extending the earlier phonics teaching with further spelling, grammar and punctuation concepts. Each year of teaching provides continuous revision and consolidation of topics taught in previous years. Children are also taught the core concepts of grammar and punctuation, starting with simple age-appropriate definitions, which are gradually built on with each year of teaching. The teaching continues to be multi-sensory with actions and colour coding (fitting with Montessori) for parts of speech to help children develop their understanding of how language works. The systematic programme means children are given the tools that they need to independently write what they want clearly and with expression.

  • Early Reading and Phonics Policy

    ! Scope and Sequence

  • Early Reading and Phonics Policy

    ! Jolly Phonics and the National Curriculum.

    https://www.jollylearning.co.uk/jolly-phonics-catalogue/curriculum-links/

    ! Jolly Phonics Orange Level Readers is the complete set of early decodable readers providing a gradual and structured start for children who are just starting to learn to read. These general fiction readers cover the 42 letter sounds across 7 sets, with each covering one particular set. The last set of readers also features a small number of tricky words. Children can be introduced to these books as each group of sounds is taught. The text in the first three books uses only decodable regular words made up from the first group of letter sounds; the text in the next three books uses only the first and second groups of letter sounds, and so on. Comprehension questions and discussion topics are provided at the end of each book, as well as guidance for teachers and parents. Light type is used as a guide for those few letters that should not be sounded out, such as the /b/ in ‘lamb’. 3 different books per set, all 21 titles in Complete Set 12 pages per book 1 Sentence per page (approx.)

    The complete set contains decodable regular words made up from all seven groups of letter sounds:

    ! s, a, t, i, p, n ! c k, e, h, r, m, d

  • Early Reading and Phonics Policy

    ! g, o, u, l, f, b ! ai, j, oa, ie, ee, or ! z, w, ng, v, oo, oo ! y, x, ch, sh, th, th ! qu, ou, oi, ue, er, ar ! Set 7 also includes the tricky words I, the, she, he, me, we, be ! Jolly Phonics Readers Level 1 Red Set is the first of four levels of decodable books, providing the best

    start for children just starting to read. At every stage the words are within the reach of children as they use their letter sound knowledge and tricky words already taught. Tricky words are shown at the beginning of each book. Comprehension questions and discussion topics are provided at the end of each book. Also includes guidance for teachers and parents. Light type is used as a guide for those few letters that should not be sounded out, such as the /b/ in lamb. Level 1 features words that are spelled regularly, and can be sounded out with the 42 letter sounds first taught in Jolly Phonics. 3 series – Inky Mouse and Friends, General Fiction & Nonfiction 6 different books per series, all 18 titles in Complete Set 8 Pages per book 11 Tricky Words per book 1 Sentence per page (approx) 0 Alternative spellings per book

    ! Jolly Phonics Readers Level 2 Yellow Set the second of four levels of decodable books, providing the best start for children just starting to read. At every stage the words are within the reach of children as they use their letter sound knowledge and tricky words already taught. Tricky words are shown at the beginning of each book. Comprehension questions and discussion topics are provided at the end of each book. Also includes guidance for teachers and parents. Light type is used as a guide for those few letters that should not be sounded out, such as the /b/ in lamb. In addition to the 42 letter sounds, Level 2 introduces /y/ used for the /ee/ sound at the end of words like ‘funny’.

    3 series – Inky Mouse and Friends, General Fiction & Nonfiction 6 different books per series, all 18 titles in Complete Set 12 Pages per book 20 Tricky Words per book 2 Sentences per page (approx) 0 Alternative spellings per book

    ! Jolly Phonics Readers Level 3 Green Set is the third of four levels of decodable books, providing the

    best start for children just starting to read. At every stage the words are within the reach of children as they use their letter sound knowledge and tricky words already taught.

    Tricky words are shown at the beginning of each book. Comprehension questions and discussion topics are provided at the end of each book. Also includes guidance for teachers and parents. Light type is used as a guide for those few letters that should not be sounded out, such as the /b/ in lamb.

  • Early Reading and Phonics Policy

    Level 3 introduces the ‘magic e’ for spelling words with the long vowels, as in ‘make’, ‘like’, ‘bone’ and ‘tune’.

    3 series – Inky Mouse and Friends, General Fiction & Nonfiction 6 different books per series, all 18 titles in Complete Set 16 Pages per book 40 Tricky Words per book 4 Sentences per page (approx) 5 Alternative spellings per book

    ! Jolly Phonics Readers Level 4 Blue Set is the fourth set of four levels of decodable books, providing the best start for children just starting to read. At every stage the words are within the reach of children as they use their letter sound knowledge and tricky words already taught. Tricky words are shown at the beginning of each book. Comprehension questions and discussion topics are provided at the end of each book. Also includes guidance for teachers and parents. Light type is used as a guide for those few letters that should not be sounded out, such as the /b/ in lamb. In Level 4 the stories are much longer, and introduce more tricky words. Covers all the Jolly Phonics alternative vowel spellings that are used to make words like ‘day’, ‘seat’, ‘night’, ‘snow’, ‘few’, ‘girl’, ‘straw’, ‘boy’ and ‘scowl’. 3 series – Inky Mouse and Friends, General Fiction & Nonfiction 6 different books per series, all 18 titles in Complete Set 16 Pages per book 61 Tricky Words per book 4 Sentences per page (approx) 18 Alternative spellings per book

    ! The Jolly Phonics Reading Assessment is a child-friendly assessment that teachers can use with their pupils in a one-to-one situation. A pack of carefully developed materials have been created to provide an easy and quick method of assessing children’s decoding and comprehension knowledge. Suitable for use with children aged 4-6 years old, this can be used as a phonics screening check resource or by individual teacher’s to ensure that no child gets left behind. Split into two sections, the Jolly Phonics Reading Assessment provides:

    • 2 Reading Tests for word reading and sentence reading • 2 Supplementary Tests for letter sound plus tricky words and aural comprehension

    All items are contained in an A4 folder and include the following: • 24 page manual – support and guidance for teachers on how to implement the assessments • Photocopiable pupil record sheets • Word reading and sentence reading colour sheets • Letter sounds and tricky word assessment colour sheets

  • Early Reading and Phonics Policy

    ! Reading Progression Map: Nursery to Year Two

  • Early Reading and Phonics Policy

  • Early Reading and Phonics Policy

  • Early Reading and Phonics Policy

  • Early Reading and Phonics Policy

    ! Rose Report

    In 2006 Sir Jim Rose completed his independent review of the teaching of early reading. The Rose Report makes it clear that ‘high-quality phonic work’ should be taught systematically and discretely as the prime approach used in the teaching of early reading. The review report provided clear recommendations of what constitutes ‘high-quality phonics work.’

    “Despite uncertainties in research findings, the practice seen by the review shows that the systematic approach, which is generally understood as “synthetic” phonics, offers the vast majority of young children the best and most direct route to becoming skilled readers and writers.” (Independent Review of the Teaching of Early Reading - Jim Rose) The ‘simple view of reading’ The Rose Report makes a number of recommendations for the teaching of early reading. It makes clear that there are two dimensions to reading: 1. Word Recognition 2. Language Comprehension High-quality phonic teaching secures the crucial skills of word recognition that, once mastered, enable children to read fluently and automatically. Once children are fluent readers, they are able to concentrate on the meaning of the text. “We believe that the way children are taught is crucial to their success in learning to read. They all need knowledge of the alphabetic code and the skills of blending sounds for reading and segmenting the spoken word for spelling – whether they learn to read easily or find it difficult.” (Reading Reform Foundation (RRF) – Promoting Synthetic Phonics) “Research shows that when phonics is taught in a structured way – starting with the easiest sounds and progressing through to the most complex – it is the most effective way of teaching young children to read. It is particularly helpful for children aged 5 to 7.” (Department for Education) “Phonics is simply the code that turns written language into spoken language and vice versa. It is the vital initial step in teaching children to read but it is far from the whole picture. Phonics will only work in an environment where Speaking and Listening Skills are promoted and developed. Children should also be

  • Early Reading and Phonics Policy

    regularly exposed to a wide range of quality texts. They should be regularly read aloud to. Regular, well planned Guided Reading sessions are essential and reading skills should also be explicitly taught in Shared Reading sessions within literacy lessons.” (PhonicsPlay: Rosanna Springham) Glossary of terms: ! What is a phoneme? - It is the smallest unit of sound and a piece of terminology that children like to use

    and should be taught. At first it will equate with a letter sound but later on will include the digraphs. For example `rain’ has three phonemes, /r / ai / n.

    ! What is a grapheme? - A grapheme is a letter or a number of letters that represent a sound (phoneme) in a word. Another way to explain it is to say that a grapheme is a letter or letters that spell a sound in a word. E.g. /ee/,/ ea/, /ey/ all make the same phoneme but are spelt differently.

    ! What is a digraph? - This is when two or more letters come together to make a phoneme. /oa/ makes the sound in boat.

    ! What is blending? - Blending is the process that is involved in bringing the sounds together to make a word or a syllable and is how /c/ /a/ /t / becomes cat. To learn to read well children must be able to smoothly blend sounds together. Blending sounds fluidly helps to improve fluency when reading. Blending is more difficult to do with longer words so learning how to blend accurately from an early age is imperative.

    ! What is segmenting? - Segmenting is a skill used in spelling. In order to spell the word cat, it is necessary to segment the word into its constituent sounds; c-a-t. Children often understand segmenting as ‘chopping’ a word. Before writing a word young children need time to think about it, say the word several times, ‘chop’ the word and then write it. Once children have written the same word several times they won’t need to use these four steps as frequently. Children will enjoy spelling if it feels like fun and if they feel good about themselves as spellers. We need, therefore, to be playful and positive in our approach – noticing and praising what children can do as well as helping them to correct their mistakes. ! What are tricky words? - Tricky words are words that cannot be ‘sounded-out’ but need to be learned

    by heart. They don’t fit into the usual 4 spelling patterns. Examples of these words are attached under each phase. In order to read simple sentences, it is necessary for children to know some words that have unusual or untaught spellings. It should be noted that, when teaching these words, it is important to always start with sounds already known in the word, then focus on the 'tricky' part.

    ! What are high frequency words? - High frequency (common) are words that recur frequently in much of the written material young children read and that they need when they write.

  • Early Reading and Phonics Policy

    Web Links: 'Ofsted blog: schools, early years, further education and skills' https://educationinspection.blog.gov.uk/2019/11/04/early-reading-and-the-education-inspection-framework/ BBC Schools Online http://www.bbc.co.uk/search?filter=bitesize&q=phonics PhonicsPlay http://www.phonicsplay.co.uk/index.htm Jolly Phonics http://jollylearning.co.uk/ Letters and Sounds http://www.letters-and-sounds.com/phase-2-games.html Hairy Phonics http://www.hairyphonics.com/about-phonics/ Phonics Screening Check https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/phonics-screening-check-and-national-curriculum-assessments-at-key-stage-1-in-england-2013 Learning to read through phonics Information for Parents https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/194057/phonics_check_leaflet_2013_.pdf Literacy Trust: Rose Report http://www.literacytrust.org.uk/assets/0000/1175/Rose_Review.pdf SEN: Dyslexia, The Rose Report https://www.senmagazine.co.uk/articles/articles/senarticles/dyslexia-the-rose-report Early Education http://www.early-education.org.uk/ British Dyslexia Association www.bdadyslexia.org.uk PhonemeFlop http://www.ictgames.com/phonemeFlop_v4.html Oxford Owl http://www.oxfordowl.co.uk/welcome/home/reading-owl/fun-ideas Lovelace Primary School http://www.lovelace.kingston.sch.uk/curriculum/english/parents-guide-to-phonics/

  • Early Reading and Phonics Policy

    Bibliography: Redhill Infant School (2013) ‘Phonics Policy’ St Joseph’s Catholic Primary School School (2012) ‘Phonics Policy’ South Rise Primary School School (2013) ‘Phonics Policy’ Palmarsh Primary School (2013) ‘Phonics Policy’ St Bartholomew’s Catholic Primary School (2012) ‘Phonics Policy’ Cockwood Primary School (2012) ‘Spelling and Phonics Policy’ Chew, J ‘The recent history of government initiatives in the early teaching of reading’ Reading Reform Foundation The National Strategies (2009) ‘Letters and Sounds: Early Years CLLD – Helping your child with speaking, listening, reading and writing’ A guide for parents and carers of children in Early Years settings: The first steps to reading and writing