10
Cosmologia Alessandro Marconi Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia AA 2012/2013

Cosmologia - INAFmarconi/Lezioni/Cosmo13/Lezione01.pdf · A. Marconi Cosmologia (2012/2013) La Cosmologia La Cosmologia studia la struttura e l’evoluzione dell’universo osservabile

  • Upload
    habao

  • View
    250

  • Download
    0

Embed Size (px)

Citation preview

Page 1: Cosmologia - INAFmarconi/Lezioni/Cosmo13/Lezione01.pdf · A. Marconi Cosmologia (2012/2013) La Cosmologia La Cosmologia studia la struttura e l’evoluzione dell’universo osservabile

CosmologiaAlessandro Marconi

Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia

AA 2012/2013

Page 2: Cosmologia - INAFmarconi/Lezioni/Cosmo13/Lezione01.pdf · A. Marconi Cosmologia (2012/2013) La Cosmologia La Cosmologia studia la struttura e l’evoluzione dell’universo osservabile

Contatti, Bibliografia e LezioniProf. Alessandro Marconi

Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, stanza 254 (2o piano)Via G. Sansone 1, 50019, Sesto Fiorentino (Firenze), Italiaemail: [email protected]: 055 457 2069

BibliografiaMalcolm Longair

Galaxy FormationSpringer

Dove trovare le lezionihttp://www.arcetri.astro.it/~marconi → ”Didattica”

Piattaforma moodle (iscrizione con credenziali ateneo)http://e-l.unifi.it →cercare corso “Cosmologia”

Page 3: Cosmologia - INAFmarconi/Lezioni/Cosmo13/Lezione01.pdf · A. Marconi Cosmologia (2012/2013) La Cosmologia La Cosmologia studia la struttura e l’evoluzione dell’universo osservabile

Argomenti del corsoBasi osservative: radiazione cosmica di fondo, struttura a larga scala, legge di Hubble

Basi teoriche: curvatura dello spazio e la metrica, equazioni di Friedmann e loro caratteristiche, i parametri cosmologici

La storia termica dell'universo

La nucleosintesi

Lo sviluppo e l'evoluzione delle fluttuazioni primordiali

L'importanza della materia oscura

La ricombinazione: il fondo cosmico a microonde e le sue fluttuazioni

L'epoca successiva alla ricombinazione

Il mezzo intergalattico

Evoluzione cosmologica di galassie e nuclei attivi (→Fisica delle Galassie)

Modelli di formazione ed evoluzione delle galassie (→Fisica delle Galassie)

Page 4: Cosmologia - INAFmarconi/Lezioni/Cosmo13/Lezione01.pdf · A. Marconi Cosmologia (2012/2013) La Cosmologia La Cosmologia studia la struttura e l’evoluzione dell’universo osservabile

IntroduzioneLezione 1

Page 5: Cosmologia - INAFmarconi/Lezioni/Cosmo13/Lezione01.pdf · A. Marconi Cosmologia (2012/2013) La Cosmologia La Cosmologia studia la struttura e l’evoluzione dell’universo osservabile

A. Marconi Cosmologia (2012/2013)

La CosmologiaLa Cosmologia studia la struttura e l’evoluzione dell’universo osservabile

L’universo, ovvero il sistema fisico in esame, è unico per cui non è possibile ripetere le osservazioni

Le osservazioni cosmologiche sono limitate dalla velocità finita della luce: dati r, t di una sorgente (osservatore in r=0, t=t0), la possiamo osservare solo se |r| = c (t0-t)

Universo deve avere struttura “semplice” per poter essere studiato.

5

Page 6: Cosmologia - INAFmarconi/Lezioni/Cosmo13/Lezione01.pdf · A. Marconi Cosmologia (2012/2013) La Cosmologia La Cosmologia studia la struttura e l’evoluzione dell’universo osservabile

A. Marconi Cosmologia (2012/2013)

Osservazioni Cosmologiche FondamentaliParadosso di Olbers: il cielo di notte è buio

Distribuzione uniforme delle galassie in cielo

Legge di Hubble: v = H0 r

Abbondanza cosmica dell’Elio: He è ~ 25-30% massa totale

Età degli ammassi globulari della nostra galassia: più vecchi ~12 Gyr

Emissione cosmica di fondo: Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB)

Spettro della CMB: corpo nero con T=2.728±0.004 K

Conteggi numerici delle radio sorgenti: universo euclideo, popolazione uniforme N(>S) ~ S-3/2

6

Page 7: Cosmologia - INAFmarconi/Lezioni/Cosmo13/Lezione01.pdf · A. Marconi Cosmologia (2012/2013) La Cosmologia La Cosmologia studia la struttura e l’evoluzione dell’universo osservabile

Conteggi di radio sorgenti144

4. Cosmology I: Homogeneous Isotropic World Models

Fig. 4.4. Number counts of radio sources as a function of flux,normalized by the Euclidean expectation N(S) ! S"5/2, corre-sponding to the integrated counts N(> S) ! S"3/2. Counts aredisplayed for three different frequencies; they clearly deviatefrom the Euclidean expectation

shell of radius r and thickness dr around us containsn# dV = 4!r2 dr n# stars. Each of these stars subtendsa solid angle of !R2

#/r2 on our sky, so the stars in theshell cover a total solid angle of

d" = 4!r2 dr n#R2

#!r2

= 4!2 n# R2# dr . (4.1)

We see that this solid angle is independent of the radius rof the spherical shell because the solid angle of a singlestar ! r"2 just compensates the volume of the shell ! r2.To compute the total solid angle of all stars in a staticEuclidean universe, (4.1) has to be integrated over alldistances r, but the integral

" =$!

0

drd"

dr= 4!2 n# R2

#

$!

0

dr

diverges. Formally, this means that the stars cover aninfinite solid angle, which of course makes no sensephysically. The reason for this divergence is that wedisregarded the effect of overlapping stellar disks on thesphere. However, these considerations demonstrate thatthe sky would be completely filled with stellar disks, i.e.,from any direction, along any line-of-sight, light froma star would reach us. Since the specific intensity I# isindependent of distance – the surface brightness of the

Sun as observed from Earth is the same as seen by anobserver who is much closer to the Solar surface – thesky would have a temperature of % 104 K; fortunately,this is not the case!

Source Counts (8): Consider now a population ofsources with a luminosity function that is constant inspace and time, i.e., let n(> L) be the spatial num-ber density of sources with luminosity larger than L.A spherical shell of radius r and thickness dr aroundus contains 4!r2 dr n(> L) sources with luminositylarger than L. Because the observed flux S is re-lated to the luminosity via L = 4! r2 S, the number ofsources with flux > S in this spherical shell is given asdN(> S) = 4!r2 dr n(> 4! r2 S), and the total numberof sources with flux > S results from integration overthe radii of the spherical shells,

N(> S) =$!

0

dr 4! r2 n(> 4! r2 S) .

Changing the integration variable to L = 4! r2 S, orr = &

L/(4!S), with dr = dL/(2&

4!LS), yields

N(> S) =$!

0

dL

2&

4!LS

L4!S

n(> L)

= 116!3/2 S"3/2

$!

0

dL&

L n(> L) . (4.2)

From this result we deduce that the source counts insuch a universe is N(> S) ! S"3/2, independent ofthe luminosity function. This is in contradiction to theobservations.

From these two contradictions – Olbers’ paradox andthe non-Euclidean source counts – we conclude thatat least one of the assumptions must be wrong. OurUniverse cannot be all three of Euclidean, infinite, andstatic. The Hubble flow, i.e., the redshift of galaxies, in-dicates that the assumption of a static Universe is wrong.

The age of globular clusters (5) requires thatthe Universe is at least 12 Gyr old because it can-not be younger than the oldest objects it contains.Interestingly, the age estimates for globular clustersyield values which are very close to the Hubbletime H"1

0 = 9.78 h"1 Gyr. This similarity suggests that

Per universo Euclideo, statico e infinito una popolazione con funzione di luminosità “costante” nello spazio e nel tempo haN(>S) ~ S-3/2 n(S) ~ S-5/2

n(S)/S-5/2

Page 8: Cosmologia - INAFmarconi/Lezioni/Cosmo13/Lezione01.pdf · A. Marconi Cosmologia (2012/2013) La Cosmologia La Cosmologia studia la struttura e l’evoluzione dell’universo osservabile

Età degli ammassi

Ammasso globulare Messier 5 (M5)

4.1 Introduction and Fundamental Observations

143

Fig. 4.2. (a) Color–magnitude diagram of the globular clus-ter M 5. The different sections in this diagram are labeled.A: main sequence; B: red giant branch; C: point of heliumflash; D: horizontal branch; E: Schwarzschild gap in the hori-zontal branch; F: white dwarfs, below the arrow. At the pointwhere the main sequence turns over to the red giant branch(called the “turn-off point”), stars have a mass correspond-ing to a main-sequence lifetime which is equal to the age ofthe globular cluster (see Appendix B.3). Therefore, the age ofthe cluster can be determined from the position of the turn-off point by comparing it with models of stellar evolution.

(b) Isochrones, i.e., curves connecting the stellar evolution-ary position in the color–magnitude diagram of stars of equalage, are plotted for different ages and compared to the stars ofthe globular cluster 47 Tucanae. Such analyses reveal that theoldest globular clusters in our Milky Way are about 13 billionyears old, where different authors obtain slightly differing re-sults – details of stellar evolution may play a role here. Theage thus obtained also depends on the distance of the clus-ter. A revision of these distances by the HIPPARCOS satelliteled to a decrease of the estimated ages by about 2 billionyears

Fig. 4.3. CMB spectrum, plotted as intensity vs. frequency,measured in waves per centimeter. The solid line showsthe expected spectrum of a blackbody of temperature T =2.728 K. The error bars of the data, observed by the FIRASinstrument on-board COBE, are so small that the data pointswith error bars cannot be distinguished from the theoreticalcurve

Main Sequence

Red Giant Branch

Helium Flash

Horizontal branch

gap

white dwarfs

Turn off point

Ammasso globulare 47 Tucanae

Page 9: Cosmologia - INAFmarconi/Lezioni/Cosmo13/Lezione01.pdf · A. Marconi Cosmologia (2012/2013) La Cosmologia La Cosmologia studia la struttura e l’evoluzione dell’universo osservabile

A. Marconi Cosmologia (2012/2013)

Conseguenze e sviluppiL’universo non può essere contemporaneamente Euclideo (geometria piatta), infinito e statico.

Possiamo assumere che l’universo sia omogeneo ed isotropo (Principio Cosmologico)

Principio Cosmologico + Relatività Generale → Equazioni di Friedman (evoluzione temporale di universo in espansione con età ~1/H0 ~ 14 Gyr)

Universo in espansione → Big Bang (universo di dimensioni infinitesime)

Temperature iniziali molto alte → reazioni di fusione nucleare (nucleosintesi primordiale e produzione di He)

9

Page 10: Cosmologia - INAFmarconi/Lezioni/Cosmo13/Lezione01.pdf · A. Marconi Cosmologia (2012/2013) La Cosmologia La Cosmologia studia la struttura e l’evoluzione dell’universo osservabile

A. Marconi Cosmologia (2012/2013)

Conseguenze e sviluppiEspansione → universo si raffredda, ricombinazione p+e = H e disaccoppiamento da radiazione → radiazione fossile della CMB

Equazioni di Friedman = evoluzione universo su grande scala; su piccole scale si segue l’evoluzione delle piccole perturbazioni per spiegare la formazione delle strutture (galassie ed ammassi di galassie)

E’ necessaria la presenza di perturbazioni pre-esistenti Δρ/ρ~10-4 per spiegare le strutture esistenti adesso → sono quelle osservate nella CMB

Costituente fondamentale per spiegare le strutture osservate: Materia Oscura (Dark Matter)

Esistenza di una Costante Cosmologica: ~96% dell’universo è ignoto!

10

70%

26%

4%

Dark Energy

Dark Matter

Barions