Contextual Research Process Book Lacoste Spring 2014 Final

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This is the process book that describes our contextual research project in the southern section of France know as Provence.

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  • 1CONTEXTUAL RESEARCHOF NATURE, CULTURE &FOOD ARTISANSHIP IN PROVENCE, FRANCEIDUS 215/711 METHODS OF CONTEXTUAL RESEARCHSPRING 2014, LACOSTE

    SOURCE: toptravellists.net

  • 2IMPRESSUMProject Participants:

    Nathan Beck, Abbie Francisco, Mark Hemphill, Katie Murray,

    Monica Seggos, Raquel Serebrenik, Isaac Toonkel, Marcelo Torres,

    Nicole Walsh.

    Advisors:

    Regina Rowland Professor of Design Management

    Ernst Kortshak Scientist at the Design Table

    Unless otherwise credited, all photographs copyrighted by

    authors.

    2014 Savannah College of Art and Design, Lacoste, France

  • 3DEDICATIONThis project is dedicated to the people of Provence, without whom

    neither our schoolwork nor our own personal cultural development

    could have taken place.

  • 4First and foremost, we would like to thank everyone who helped

    make this project possible. The people of Provence were absolutely

    central to our contextual experience of this place, and without

    Paula Wallace and all the hard-working individuals in the Savannah

    College of Art and Designs study abroad program, we would not

    have had the privilege of living and learning in beautiful Lacoste.

    Thank you as well to Regina Rowland and Ernst Kortschak for

    acting as mentors in all things academic and ecological. Lastly, we

    give thanks to our family and friends for all their moral and financial

    support, without which we would not be where we are today.

    ACKNOWLEDGEMENT

  • 5CONTENTSIntroduction 6RESEARCH DESIGN & PLANNING 7Framing 8Methodology 10Eco System Map 11Research Subquestions 12Secondary Research 13PROJECT MATRIX 14Timeline 16FIELDWORK 17Overview Location Map 18Observations 19Note Taking 20Participatory Evaluation 21Multi-Sensory Observations 22Semi-Structured Interviews 23Samples 24Research Protocols 26Probing Questions 27Working Walls 28Working Walls (Final) 29ANALYSIS 30Word Cloud 31Olive Product Journey Map 32Visual Map Of Nature 33Product Graph 34Process Report 35Affinity Diagram 36SYNTHESIS 37Insight 1 38Insight 1 Map 39Insight 2 40Insight 3 41Insight 4 42Insight 5 43Insight 6 44Insight 6 Map 45Opportunity Map 46Conclusion 47Recommendation 48EXHIBITION POSTERS 49APPENDIX 57Team Bios 58Research Protocols 61Bibliography 67

  • 6INTRODUCTIONIn this Contextual Research class, we were interested in exploring

    the relationship between nature, culture, and food artisanship in the

    Provenal region of France (where SCAD Lacoste is located). We

    researched products that are traditional to the region: goat cheese,

    candied fruits, wine, and olive oil. Initially, we gathered background

    stories on the internet, in books, and in academic publications.

    From this foundational research, we developed a plan of action

    for collecting data in the field. We conducted interviews with local

    artisans, made observations, learned about their lives and both the

    traditional and novel methods they use. Applying a distinct design

    research process, we collected, analyzed and mapped data in order

    to better understand the relationship between nature, culture, and

    artisanship.

    This study led to our deep appreciation of the people of Provence,

    their land, their practices, and their culinary specialties, created

    with passion. Conducting research abroad in a foreign language

    helped us gain a unique perspective about empathy and the design

    process as a whole that we will carry with us to future projects.

    This experience will enable us to offer our clients a deeper level of

    awareness, a way to gain in-depth insights about their challenges,

    and a platform from which to create innovative solutions.

  • 7RESEARCH DESIGN & PLANNINGContextual Research of Nature, Culture & Food Artisanship in Provence, France

  • 8FRAMINGTITLE OF STUDY

    SUBJECT OF STUDY

    TARGET AUDIENCE

    PROBLEM STATEMENT

    Food Artisanship: Relationships Between Nature, Culture and Craft.

    Three artisanal groups were identified as target groups for this case study.

    These have been named Farmers, Makers, and Consumers. Makers were the

    established entrepreneurs who have dedicated their lives to crafting wine, goat

    cheese, or candied fruit. These artisans have learned and adopted processes

    within the realm of their developed craft. They may farm crops, process raw

    goods into consumable form, package products, distribute and sell these

    goods, and manage a successful business flow. Farmers were the workers and

    producers of the main ingredient of the artisan craft. They cultivated and tended

    to the specific plant or animal that was needed by the artisan. In some cases,

    the farmer and maker were one, in other cases the farmer was either proximate

    or geographically distant and outsourced by the artisan. The farmers understood

    the land and the surrounding environment. This knowledge may have been

    acquired through inherited guidance, observations of nature, trial and error, or

    external inquiries. Consumers could be chefs, enthusiasts, traditionalists, tourists,

    or everyday shoppers. They may incorporate artisanal ingredients into higher

    value offerings in a retail setting, purchase goods as gifts for others, reinforce

    cultural norms via consumption, or simply enjoy artisanal foods as standalone

    experiences.

    Food artisans, including farmers, producers and chefs are part of a natural

    and cultural ecosystem. It is possible that all such actors are aware of the

    relationships present in this larger system, but value can likely be added

    (in the Provenal region and elsewhere) by making these relationships more

    transparent.

    The concept for exploring the relationship arose out of the commonly held

    belief amongst members of our contextual research class that the Provenal

    region of France supports a disproportionately vibrant community of food

    artisans. Provence is known for its traditional production of wine, olive oil, soap,

    candied fruit and goat cheese, among other goods. Guided by an inclination

    to understand human relationships with nature, we decided to align our

    academic inquiry with the geographic availability of relevant research subjects:

    culture, nature, and food artisans. As such, it appeared that relationships in the

    Provenal region between cultural, natural, and culinary entities could inform

    the formation (or at least fostering) of similarly healthy ecosystems elsewhere

    (e.g. Savannah, Georgia, USA). The intent of this study was thus twofold: first,

    to assist the existing food artisanship community in Provence by shining light

    on their own activities through a contextual research lens; second, to identify

    insights that constitute opportunities for innovation in the domain of food

    artisanship in regions external to that of our study.

    MAIN RESEARCH QUESTIONWhat is the relationship between nature, culture and food artisanship in the

    Provenal region of France?

  • 9From this research, we expected two categorically different opportunities. First,

    by reflecting back to the participants the pattern that we noticed about food

    artisanship in the region, they may have found new perspectives about their own

    shared methodologies and identities. Furthermore, we could potentially offer the

    insights we found of the cultural, natural and artisanal systems to people in the

    Provenal region. Second, we could nudge systems abroad (e.g. in Savannah,

    GA, USA) by fostering cornerstone relationships in the realm of food artisanship.

    A characterization of the relationships between nature, culture and food

    artisanship in Provence, France, can benefit the contextual research community

    at large by offering a structured representation of traditional culinary crafts. By

    conducting this research abroad, yet publishing our results in English, we hoped

    to provide a novel lens that native English speakers can use as a comparison to

    their existing perspective on artisanal foods. Furthermore, this study can provide

    the younger generation seeking to get involved in their local food industry with

    a structured guide highlighting key aspects of the natural and cultural facets

    involved in the craft.

    This study broadened our perspective to better understand relationships between

    humans and their natural and cultural environment. This framing lended nuance

    to the traditional product design model emphasizing functional relationships

    between humans and their physical objects. It gave us functional insight into the

    human-nature-culture ecosystem, which will, in turn, serve as an intellectual asset

    to developing future sustainable products or services within our specific fields of

    study.

    The scope of the project was defined as engagement with food artisans of the

    Provenal region and those related to this industry. We were focusing specifically

    on wine, candied fruit, goat cheese and olive oil as archetypal artisanal products.

    The time frame for the project was April 1st through May 22nd, 2014. Food

    artisans included the growers, farmers and producers. People relationally

    adjacent to the food artisanship industry included suppliers, consumers, business

    leaders, and company owners. While we intended to make a statement relevant

    to the entire Provenal region, a disproportionate amount of our primary research

    took place in Lacoste and adjacent towns. Furthermore, due to time and mobility

    constraints, we did not acquire a statistically significant body of data. Thus,

    we were not looking at artisanal products outside of the four aforementioned

    categories; we did not conduct longitudinal interviews or observations to

    directly discover patterns of change in time; and we did not empirically validate

    statements made by interviewees or non-peer-reviewed secondary research

    sources. Rather, we aimed to collect a manageable number of rich descriptions

    from which qualitatively compelling design opportunities could emerge.

    The focus area was the characterization of relationships between nature, culture

    and food artisanship in the Provenal region of Southern France. Specifically,

    the characteristics which define each of these elements and how they function

    in relation to one another. Through the process of contextual research, data

    analysis and synthesis, insights were gained and opportunities identified for

    creating a new model of interaction.

    PURPOSE

    SIGNIFICANCE OF STUDY (for design students)

    SIGNIFICANCE OF STUDY (for the larger community)

    OPPORTUNITY STATEMENT

    SCOPE

  • 10

    We conducted a basic contextual research case study with an ethnographic

    lens and a limited participatory research aspect. A case study emphasizes

    detailed contextual analysis of a limited number of events or conditions and their

    relationships. It is descriptive and exploratory. Ethnographic research usually

    involves observing subjects in their natural, real-world environment. It searches

    for meaning and understanding of their social setting and relationships with

    their surroundings; it aims to gather insight into how people live their everyday

    or professional lives. Thus, our research included observations, field notes and

    interviews. We incorporated participatory aspects because as researchers,

    we recorded our own experiences as we tasted, smelled, observed and

    conducted interviews on our subjects of study. We considered this combination

    of methodologies to be well suited to our research question because we tried

    to understand how people from the Provenal region are affected by their

    surroundings in regards to nature and culture. We dove into a culture that we

    had not experienced previously, observing it from an ethnographic point of view.

    Doing so gave us a richer understanding of the cultural and natural environment

    of the Provenal region.

    METHODOLOGYRESEARCH METHODOLOGY

    DATA COLLECTION METHODS

    Observation

    Interviews

    Personal Exploration

  • 11

    After formulating our main research question What is the

    relationship between nature, culture and food artisanship in the

    Provenale region of France? we needed to visualize this

    relationship in order to determine its implications for our secondary

    research. After moving through several iterations, we returned

    to the simplest representation of overlapping entities: the venn

    diagram. These three circles established seven categories of study:

    nature, culture and food artisanship as standalone entities; the

    three overlaps between them; and finally, the central meeting point.

    These categories, in turn, directed the formation of our research

    subquestions and provided an effective visual schema onto which

    secondary research findings could be mapped.

    ECO SYSTEM MAP

    CULTURE ARTISANSHIP NATURE

    AWARENESS + BEING IN TUNE WITH CONTEXT

    TRADITIONS + NEW WAYS

    ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT UPON

    PRODUCT

    NATURECULTURE

    ARTISANSHIP[craf t ]

    [wor ldviews] [condi t ions]

    1

    7

    2

    3

    5 4

    6

    E N T I T I E S

  • 12

    NATURE NATUREARTISANSHIP

    ARTISANSHIP

    RESEARCH SUBQUESTIONS

    AWARENESS +

    BEING IN TUNE

    WITH CONTEXT

    ENVIRONMENTAL

    IMPACT UPON

    PRODUCT

    TRADITIONS +

    NEW WAYS

    What is the region most proud of? What is most important to them? What are the challenges and

    opportunities?

    ARTISANSHIP

    ARTISANSHIP

    What are the conditions of the natural environment?

    What is the craft of food artisans? Why are they doing it? What are they getting out of it?

    How does nature affect the product and processes associated with their craft?

    How do food artisans accept, adjust, and turn events they do not control into

    opportunities?

    How connected are artisans to their natural environment?

    What kind of person does the food artisan become due to living in the

    nexus of nature, culture, and craft?

    What are the traditional ways of production? How are these ways used today? How are new ways integrated? How do artisans know when to transition or

    integrate?

    ARTISAN + NATURE

    + CULTURE

    ARTISANSHIP

    NATURE

    NATURE

    CULTURE

    CULTURE

    CULTURE CULTURE

  • 13

    AWARENESS + BEING IN TUNE WITH CONTEXT

    TRADITIONS + NEW WAYS

    ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT UPON

    PRODUCT

    NATURECULTURE

    ARTISANSHIP[craf t ]

    [wor ldviews] [condi t ions]

    1

    7

    2

    3

    5 4

    6

    SECONDARY RESEARCHProvenal people codify their traditions (agricultural regions, fetes, etc.) in social, political and economic structures. Additionally, they work extremely hard, but have a deep appreciation for slowness, grace and charm (Demossier, 2011; Lanson, 2007.)

    The region of Provence is located between the southern Alps and the Mediterranean sea, encompassing a huge diversity of ecosystems. Throughout these zones, the seasonal cycle is most important, but there are also events on a larger time scale which have huge impact (e.g. rockslides, semi-centennial frosts, and inundations) (Lasceve, 2011; Monnier et al, 2012.)

    Space (as exemplified by soil) and time (notably, traditional methods of preservation) heavily influence the artisanal definition of product authenticity and quality (Beckett-Young, 1989; Demossier, 2011; Preston, 2008; Swinburn, 2011.)

    Food artisans play a pivotal role in defining a collective disclosure associating themselves (and the true French) with work ethic, family values, community and a non-competitive small business sector. Anecdotally supporting the duality of structure theory, this story is presented outwardly to tourists as a way to retrieve and sustain heterogenous local identities (Rogers, 2002; Swinburn, 2011.)

    Since Roman times, traditions, processes, and rituals (in regards to candied fruit, fromage, wine, and olive oil) have persisted and are applied alongside new methods and techniques in modern manufacturing. Furthermore, highly structured artisanal organizations of France consciously articulate the elements of their craft in part to market their products (Demossier, 2011; Swinburn, 2011; Rogers, 2002; MacDonald, 2011.)

    The environment (especially the soil) of Provence is central to the typology and quality of artisanal foods produced here. Furthermore, artisans view themselves, in part, as a mediator and/or conduit towards nature (Demossier, 2011; DallOrto, 1985; Jones, 1947; Sargent, 1952; Gade, 2004; Van Leeuwen and Seguin, 2006; Coffey, 2011.)

    The people of Provence have continuously altered and adapted to their local environment in order to further economic growth. The most notable example of this growth deals with water. Mass irrigation of dry lands and drainage of swamps demonstrate the interaction of people with their natural environment (Rosenthal, 1990; Aspe et al, 2012.)

  • 14

    PROJECT MATRIXContextual Research of Nature, Culture & Food Artisanship in Provence, France

  • 15

    WHAT DO I NEED TO KNOW?

    WHY DO WE NEED TO KNOW

    THIS?

    WHAT TYPE OF DATA IS NEEDED?

    WHERE CAN I FIND THIS DATA?

    WHAT TYPE OF DATA

    COLLECTION METHODS?

    WHO DO WE CONTACT?

    WHEN DO WE NEED TO KNOW?

    WHAT ARE WE TAKING AWAY? WHAT ARE WE

    LEARNING?

    WHAT MIGHT WE BE MISSING?

    What is the region most proud of? What is most important to them? What are the challenges and opportunities?

    Work Traditions Heritage Culture Beliefs Values Perceptions Behaviors

    Discover priorities Develop sense of people Identify frames of mind Define worldviews Note behaviors Understand investments (mental, physical)

    Conversational pieces Provenal localsPersonal interviews Observations Secondary research

    Florence Thurston, Marie Bayol Week 5

    Hopes Dreams Fears Values Worldviews

    Even spread of Provenal people, chosen participants might be outliers (societal outsiders), and missing elements of information they aren't proud of

    What are the conditions of the natural environment?

    Seasons Hydrological cycles Sunlight Topology Natural disasters Flora Fauna

    Identify conditions under which their product flourishes Qualify reactions to the conditions Identify geological and biological factors Provide ecological focus

    Rainfall Temperature Seasons Soil quality Fauna Flora

    Local experts (Scientist at the Design Table) Secondary research Farmer's almanac

    Personal interviews Secondary research

    Florence Thurston, Marie Bayol Week 4 and 5

    Atunement with the land, opportunities the environment provides, what kind of people can thrive here, and natural dependencies

    Sufficient expert advice

    What is the craft of artisans? Why are they doing it? What are they getting out of it?

    Process steps Elements used and not used Personal histories of life style and craft Larger traditions

    Define craft of artisans Record subjective experiences Map how knowledge is acquired Understand how artisanship shapes lives

    Production process Motivations Construction of meaning

    Artisans and crafters Consumers Employees of artisanal organizations

    Interviews Secondary research Blogs Observation

    Florence Thurston, Marie Bayol Week 5

    Why artisans do what they do, how the region supports artisans, and processes shared amongst communities

    An external viewpoint of artisans and holistic mapping of processes (due to privacy or time concerns)

    How does nature affect the product and processes associated with their craft? How do food artisans accept, adjust, and turn events they do not control into opportunities?

    Desirable/undesirable environmental conditions Tools and technology used Perceptions of opportunities Attitudes towards change

    Characterize adaptation behavior Define culture with nature Map effect of natural process on the product and market Quantify artisans' atunement Understand uniquely Provenal nature

    If-then statements Strategies Attitudes

    Artisans Growers Secondary research

    Interviews Secondary research

    Florence Thurston, Marie Bayol Week 4 and 5

    Resilience of artisans to nature and adaptability of artisans to nature

    Validity of beliefs and accurate conveyance of memories

    What are the traditional ways of production? How are these ways used today? How are new ways integrated? How do artisans know when to transition or integrate?

    Traditional methods of the producers Novel techniques Change mechanisms Epistemology

    Form picture of craft's culture and maintenance Identify traditional methods Characterize adaptability/resiliency of artisans Determine current trends

    Strategies Processes Heritage Family traditions

    Artisans Secondary research

    Interviews Secondary research

    Florence Thurston, Marie Bayol Week 5 and 6

    Cultural resilience of artisans, cultural adaptability of artisans, and traditions of artisanal processes

    Holistic stories Scale Meaning

    How connected are artisans to their natural environment?

    Types of nature they encounter Depth of ecological knowledge Emotional importance of nature to individuals

    Understand interactions with nature Identify what they give back to nature (physically, spiritually)

    Behaviors Strategies Technology utilization Subjective relationships

    Artisans Locals

    Interviews Observation

    Florence Thurston, Marie Bayol Week 5

    Identity with nature, routines in nature, and classification of nature as resource, privileged, responsibility

    Appropriate people (subjects) Well-worded questions

    What kind of person does the food artisan become due to living in the nexus of nature, culture, and craft?

    If they feel that they adopted this identity or if it was created by the circumstances of their craft/culture/nature What is the description of the group to which they believe they belong

    To learn who the holders or the carriers are in order to understand the relationship between nature, culture, producer or artisan.

    Self-image Relationships Interactions Tasks Routines

    Artisans (indirect information) and other locals Observation

    Interviews Observation

    Florence Thurston, Marie Bayol Week 6

    Affect of system on potential participants and true identity of our subjects

    Appropriate research methodology, the impact of our own experience in this study, and trust of interviewees

  • 16

    TIMELINE

    APRIL

    April 1Project Start

    Field Research Finished

    Digitization of Data Finished

    Process Book Finished

    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25

    MAY

    I N I T I A L R E S E A R C H P R O J E C T Q U E S T I O N

    E C O S Y S T E M M A P + S E C O N D A R Y R E S E A R C H

    R E S E A R C H S T U D Y S U B Q U E S T I O N S

    8 days

    6 days

    4 days

    7 days

    5 days

    3 days

    5 days

    2 wks

    7 days

    1.2 wks

    1.2 wks

    6 days

    3 days

    W O R K I N G W A L L - S E C O N D A R Y R E S E A R C H

    P R O J E C T M A T R I X

    R E S E A R C H P R O T O C O L S

    F I E L D R E S E A R C H

    W O R K I N G W A L L + I N S I G H T S

    D I G I T I Z E D D A T A M A P S

    O P P O R T U N I T Y M A P

    D I G I T I Z E A L L D A T A

    P R O C E S S B O O K

    D I G I T I Z E D T R A N S C R I B E D I N T E R V I E W S + O B S E R V A T I O N S

    P A R I S

  • 17

    FIELDWORKContextual Research of Nature, Culture & Food Artisanship in Provence, France

  • 18

    OVERVIEW LOCATION MAPIn order to conduct observations, interviews, and collect

    data, we needed to be mobile. Exploring Provence was

    necessary for successful collection of rich data. In order

    to travel through the surroundings, we employed a

    fleet of turbo diesel Ford transit vans, each of which fit

    one driver and eight student researchers. These vans

    acting as our mobile headquarters enabled us to collect

    data and quickly move on to our next destination, be

    it another observation opportunity or a time to collect

    direct data. Whether it was the chiseled walls of Les

    Baux chateau, the markets of Apt, or the rocky shores

    of Cassis, our mean of transportation was a fast,

    comfortable, and efficient way to traverse the diverse

    landscape of Provence.

    Fromages is a small goat farm located northeast of Lacoste where Fromage is made from a happy herd of 40 goats.

    Lacoste is a small medieval town located in southern France. Its medieval structure and history attract many tourist every year in search of characters such as the Marquis de Sade.

    Chateau La Coste is a vineyard with a tasting room. It is a fantastic out-door museum of modern art and architecture.

    Cassis is a commune situated east of Marseille in the department of Bouches-du-Rhne in the Provence-Alpes-Cte dAzur region in southern France.

    Castelas is an olive oil buisness located nearLes Baux. They produce high-end olive oil from their on-site olive orchards.

    Les Baux-de-Provence is a commune in southern France. It has a spectacular position in the Alpilles mountains, set atop a rocky outcrop that is crowned with a ruined castle overlooking the plains to the south.

    Aptunion, based in Apt, was founded in 1964 by confectioners who specialized in the manufacture of candied fruit. Aptunion has become an industry leader in candied fruits and dried processed fruit inclusions.

    GargantuApt is a small wine store located in Apt that sells a variety of wines as well as candied fruit from Aptunion.

    Leonidas is a small gourmet candy store in Apt which has a vast selection of delicatessens that will nourish your craving for sweets.

    J.C. Rousset is a small family oriented candy store located inApt that has a variety of homemade candied fruits and chocolates.

    Font Leale is a small winery located near Lacoste. The owner creates decidant wines for the locals of Provence.

  • 19

    OBSERVATIONSObserving our surrounding environment and trying

    to identify the different elements present within was

    the main goal of this stage on our research process.

    We started by locating and visiting places that could

    help us understand the context. In order to acquire

    a fuller understanding of our context, we allowed our

    mindset to be constantly changed by the increasing

    awareness of everything that surrounded us. We made

    field trips to goat farms and vineyards, olive orchards

    and candied fruit factories. Through empathy and

    immersing ourselves in artisans daily life and activities,

    we acquired pieces of information which would later be

    used as the foundation upon which to build insights.

    We sometimes played Fly-on-thewall, a method that

    consists in observing and listening to the people and

    environment without getting actively involved. We took

    notes, listened to the people, observed the interactions

    between people and product, and took pictures of

    the environment. Taking pictures turned out to be as

    important as note taking in the final analysis phase;

    from these photographs, we were able to relive (to

    some degree) the atmosphere and interactions that

    were taking place at the time.

    AptUnion candy museum

    AptUnion candy museum

    AptUnion candy museum

    Display at Castelas ol ive oi l

    Display at Castelas ol ive oi l

    Goats at farm

    Goat farm

    Apt candy store

    Apt candy store

    Fresh goat cheese

    Font Lale barrels

    Font Lale winery

  • 20

    NOTE TAKING

    Along with our more objective observations, we wrote

    down everything our senses encountered. We made

    sketches and personal notes of what we saw, felt,

    heard, smelt, and tasted. Sometimes even wrappers

    or take-aways made their way between the pages of

    our notebooks.

    Before every visit, we were given field guides to help

    remind us of specific things to look for. If, for whatever

    reason, these field guides were not used during an

    interview or observational field trip, we transfered our

    notes from our notebooks and sketchbooks to the field

    guides afterwards to help organize the information.

    From there, we used our fields guides as a reference

    to digitize all of the information gathered. We

    communicated the digitized information through

    Google Drive amongst ourselves in order to

    collaborate efficiently.

  • 21

    In order to have a complete understanding of our

    artisanal niches, we had to submit to our senses to

    further our learning potential. Putting ourselves in

    the place of customers gave us a new view on how

    businesses interact with their products and represent

    themselves to the public. Being a part of tastings let the

    business owners show us their products as well as the

    methods behind each step. Having the opportunity to

    try artisan made products was a learning experience;

    by delving into the local culture and artisanal world, we

    applied an experiential lens to our contextual research

    processes, resulting in a deeper understanding of our

    research data.

    PARTICIPATORY EVALUATION

    Goat cheese pizza from Antonies

    Candy frui t paste at HediardsCastelas ol ive oi l d isplay

    Candy frui t conf i t at AptUnion

    Wine cave at Font Lale Taste test ing candy frui t f rom AptUnion Taste test ing ol ive oi l at Castelas

  • 22

    SIGHT: From the ripening tangles of olive trees to the glossy coats of

    fresh candied fruit, Provence has proven its beauty in so many ways.

    The four crafts we studied were created in the inviting valleys of

    Provence, which are full of farms and natural vegetation.

    SOUND: One of the greatest challenges of our research process was

    the language barrier. The majority of the artisans spoke little,

    if any, English, and very few of us spoke French. However, with our

    translator, Marie, communication was possible.

    TASTE: All of the artisans proudly presented us with samples of their

    craft, and Catherine (an olive oil artisan) even taught us how to taste

    her olive oil. We enjoyed the goat cheese with crackers and some fig

    spread after having left the farm. Everything was fresh and bursting

    with flavor.

    SMELL: While the candy factory beckons you in with the sweetest

    breeze, the goat farm had a distinctly earthy smell. Castelas smelled

    clean while the oil itself presented the freshest scents of basil, chili

    pepper, rosemary, or lime. If one were to walk into Font Leale blind,

    they would know immediately that it was a winery from the damp

    smell of oak barrels and the vinted haze.

    MULTI-SENSORY OBSERVATIONSA FULL SENSORY EXPERIENCE

    Les Baux en ProvenceAptUnion

    Font Lale winery

    AptUnion Font Lale winery

    Goat cheese

  • 23

    SEMI-STRUCTURED INTERVIEWSOur interview process consisted of a professional,

    yet casual environment. Starting off with polite

    introductions, we created a friendly common ground

    by asking simple questions, thereby sparking

    conversations. After this step, we went over the consent

    forms, one of which is signed by the participant, and

    the other is given to them to keep for future reference.

    Moving ahead with the interview itself, we began by

    asking questions based on our prepared interview

    questions. To maximize efficiency, we interviewed

    in small groups, which allowed us to divide tasks

    between ourselves; while one person was asking the

    questions, others were recording the data, noticing the

    surroundings, and taking pictures. After asking all the

    questions and recording the answers as thoroughly as

    time allowed, we concluded the interview by thanking

    the participant for their time and saying goodbye. The

    interview data was then digitally transcribed as soon as

    possible.

    This is the cowline. Everything north of the line is

    cows and butter. Everything south of the cowline is

    no cows and olive oil. There are no cows because for

    most of year there is no grass.

    Finn McEoin

    For me, Provence, its something

    strong. Its hard life, cold winter, hot

    summer.

    Jean Pierre

    I use my arms to make my pizza.

    There are some machines, but it is

    better when done by hand.

    Antoine

    I defend my techniques, my way, but

    I respect others way of doing.

    Mathieu Ronchi

    Hate to pick a favorite, but spring, because of the

    positivity and new growth.

    Florence Thurston

    Tenacious, courageous, passionate. I started with nothing.

    I bought the land, and built it up. You have to work a lot and

    complete the work, so you have to be passionate.

    Micheline Perrier

    I took all the courses possible to learn about olive trees and olive

    making, all free. Also we learned from experience. Exchanging

    info with neighbors, learn from old people, they do it but they

    dont know why they do it that way, its a tradition, but it works.

    Catherine Hughes

  • 24

    SAMPLES

    Antoine (Antoine Pizza Truck Owner)

    Antoine was born in Provence, working as a

    builder for 30 years before moving into the

    pizza business seven months ago. He learned

    his craft by himself while practicing in his

    home. He drives a pizza truck around various

    towns in Provence, creating new and exciting

    recipes for his hungry customers.

    Catherine Hugues (Castelas Olive Oil)

    Catherine was born and raised in southern

    France. She went to the United States

    to study biochemistry, living there for 15

    years. She and her husband eventually

    returned to France in order to raise their

    children. Catherines husband was raised

    on an apple farm and she was raised on a

    vineyard, so they decided that olive oil was

    an appropriately similar, yet sufficiently novel

    agricultural endeavor for them. Their first

    batch of olive oil won a gold medal.

    Micheline Perrier (Fromage Goat Cheese)

    Micheline was born in Lyon and subsequently

    moved to Provence. She and her business

    partner started the goat farm 30 years ago.

    She has been working seven days a week

    since then. She makes the goat cheese and

    delivers it to all of her customers, most of

    whom have been loyal to her for 20+ years.

    Micheline is also very attached to her goats,

    even going so far as saying that they are her

    children.

    Marie Bayol(SCAD Employee)

    Born and raised in the south of France, Marie

    studied communications in Venice, Italy, and

    Nice, France. She has put her studies and

    knowledge of the land to good use helping out

    SCAD in Lacoste. She does everything from

    driving students and planning trips to passing

    out candy.

  • 25

    Matthieu Ronchi (Font Lale Wine)

    Matthieu was born in Provence. He currently

    owns the vineyard, Font Leale, which was

    passed down to him by his father and sister in

    2012. The vines that grow at this vineyard are

    typical of Provence: Syrah, Grenache, Rohl-

    De Martino [Merlot, Cabernet] and varieties

    from Bordeaux. He studied math and physics

    in college and currently focuses most of his

    free time on carpentry. His primary role is to

    direct the production at Font Leale, but he

    also occasionally goes out to work in the field.

    Florence Thurston(SCAD Employee)

    Florence was born and raised in Paris. She

    has fond memories of summering in the south

    of France, traveling down from Paris via the

    Autoroute du Soleil, (the A7.) Eventually,

    she moved to the United States, had two

    sons and worked as a French teacher. She

    returned to France in the Fall of 2013 to work

    for Savannah College of Art and Design at

    Lacoste, where she is currently employed

    as a Student Services Coordinator.

    SAMPLES

    Finn McEoin(Lacoste gardener)

    Finn was born and raised in Ireland. Once

    he came to Provence, he made the decision

    never to move back to his home country. He is

    currently employed as the gardener for SCAD,

    doing so in an exclusively organic manner. He

    is a vegetarian who eats only organic foods.

    Finn is also a writer, historian, and poet. His

    favorite drink is coffee, and he once sold

    a book he wrote on Amazon.com for 10,000

    Euro.

    Jean Pierre Soalhat (SCAD Employee)

    Jean Pierre was born and raised in the south

    of France. He is an artist, historian, and

    mayor of his town. He is employed at SCAD,

    along with his wife Hlne. He has been part

    of the restoration of the SCAD buildings in

    Lacoste, most notably Maison Basse. He has

    two children and is currently studying Greek,

    because he plans to explore the archaeology

    of Greece when he retires.

  • 26

    Contextual Research Field Guide

    If lost, please return to: ___________________Phone: ________________________________E-mail: ________________________________

    Remember:--> Take lots of photos--> Obtain consent if talking to someone (especially for pictures)--> Look for patterns and remain consistent in the types of things you record between categories (artifacts, behaviors, etc.)--> Code for factual vs. inferred data (e.g. I indicates inference)

    Sub Questions (in bold) with Corresponding Interview Questions: 1. What is the region most proud of? What is most important to them? What are the challenges and opportunities? What makes Provence special for your product? What is quintessentially Provencal? Why do you like to live here?

    2. What are the conditions of the natural environment? What is a year like? What is your favorite season? What are the local flora and fauna (local plants and animals)? What is the yield in a typical year? What are examples of things that affect the flavors of______?

    How do seasons/weather affect the product? 3. What is the craft of the producers? Why are they doing it? What are they getting out of

    it? Describe your product. How many different types of ______ do you grow/raise? What time of year is _____ most popular? What is your best season for selling? What is your relationship with the other producers of ______ in this region?

    4. How does nature affect the product and processes associated with their craft? How do

    vintners accept, adjust, and turn events they do not control into opportunities? What are the seasons here like, and how do they affect _____(product)? What happens if something (ie bad weather) goes wrong? What about Provence makes your product unique? Would the product be different if it was produced anywhere else?

    5. What are the traditional ways of winemaking? How are these ways used today? How

    are new ways integrated? How do vintners know when to transition or integrate? How long have you been in this business? What type of education is needed to be in this business? Are the recipes passed along through generations? Have new processes changed your methods? Have you changed methods? Good/bad outcome?

    6. How connected are vintners to their natural environment? How do you engage with nature? What do you do outside and why? What do you do personally know about the nature? How do you spend your time off? 7. What kind of person does the producer become due to the relationship between nature

    and culture?

    If I asked a neighbor what would they say about you? How would you describe yourself? How would I know that you are happy?

    Consent form Field guide Field guide Field guide Probing quest ions

    Probing quest ions Probing quest ions Probing quest ions Probing quest ions Probing quest ions

    RESEARCH PROTOCOL

    Informed Consent Form I voluntarily agree to participate in an interview/inquiry performed by students at the Savannah College of Art and

    Design. I understand that this interview/inquiry is being conducted by students in the Contextual Research Methods

    class in order to better understand the research process and identify opportunities for design in the realm of food

    artisanship in the Region of Provence .

    I understand that the evaluation methods may include:

    1. Recorded (audio, video and/or photography) observations 2. My completion of an evaluation questionnaire(s) 3. My participation in a 15-60 minute interview

    I grant permission for the interview/inquiry to be recorded, transcribed, translated and to be used only by the

    Savannah College of Art and Design for analysis of interview data. I grant permission for this datagenerated from

    the above methodsto be used in an educational setting.

    I understand that any identifiable information in regard to my name and/or company name will be removed from any

    material that is made available to those not directly involved in this study.

    _________________________________ _________________________________ Printed Name Signature _______________________________________ Lacoste, France Date

    Eyes Brain

    MouthEars

    Nose Heart

    Hands

    Feet

    Subjective Observations Objective Observations

    People Artifacts

    Events Behaviors

    Interactions Other

    Sketch Notes on photos & video

    (e.g. signage, packaging, tools, etc.)(e.g. other customers, artisans, etc.)

    (e.g. flow of people, sampling, etc.)(i.e important moments)

  • 27

    Probing questions (categorized by research subquestion):

    1. What is the region most proud of? What is most important to them? What are the challenges and opportunities?

    What makes Provence special for your product? What is quintessentially Provenal? Why do you like to live here?

    2. What are the conditions of the natural environment? What is a year like? What is your favorite season? What are the local flora and fauna (local plants and animals)?

    3. What is the craft of the producers? Why are they doing it? What are they getting out of it? Describe your product. How many different types of ______ do you grow/raise? What time of year is most popular? What is your best season for selling? What is your relationship with the other producers of ______ in this region?

    4. How does nature affect the product and processes associated with their craft? How do producers accept, adjust, and turn events they do not control into opportunities?

    What are the seasons here like, and how do they affect _____(product)? What happens if something (e.g. bad weather) goes wrong? What about Provence makes your product unique? Would the product be different if it was produced anywhere else?

    5. What are the traditional ways of conducting the craft? How are these ways used today? How are new ways integrated? How do artisans know when to transition or integrate? How long have you been in this business?

    What type of education is needed to be in this business? How do you acquire your recipes/processes? Have you changed methods over time? Good/bad outcome?

    6. How connected are artisans to their natural environment? How do you engage with nature? What do you do outside and why? What do you personally know about nature in this region? How do you spend your time off?

    7. What kind of person does the producer become due to the relationship between nature and culture?

    If I asked a neighbor what would they say about you? How would you describe yourself? How would I know when you are happy (as an outside observer)?

    PROBING QUESTIONS

  • 28

    WORKING WALLSWe started the process by writing descriptive words indicating

    what we thought makes this region important. The three main

    categories that emerged from this activity were nature, culture,

    and food artisanship. Then, we created potential questions and

    melded those into our final question relating the three elements.

    We moved on to mapping out how nature, culture, and food

    artisanship are connected through a relationship diagram. From

    this relationship diagram, we created a Venn diagram discussing

    further subquestions and subcategories. We created a timeline,

    subquestions and interview questions, and subcategories.

    Collection of secondary research followed, resulting in the

    organization and mapping of data. Finally, we pulled together all of

    the primary research and photos to organize and synthesize the

    information.

  • 29

    WORKING WALLS (Final)

  • 30

    ANALYSISContextual Research of Nature, Culture & Food Artisanship in Provence, France

  • 31

    WORD CLOUD

    By creating a word cloud the reader can understand what words

    were used in the process of research. The large words are the

    words that were most common and successful at the time of

    researching via online methods. As the size of the words gets

    smaller, its popularity decreases. This means that the small words

    were not used as many times as the large words were. The word

    cloud map contributes to the understanding of how the research

    was made and what the successful methods of researching this

    topic were. The combination of general words with specific ones

    can elicit a fruitful result. However, the more common the word, the

    more results the researcher found.

  • 32

    OLIVE PRODUCT JOURNEY MAPBy analyzing the process of the olive, we understood how people

    interacted with the product within the different stages. It is not until

    the product enters the marketing stage that physical interaction

    with the producer and the consumer occur. This was an interesting

    finding because this would mean that the new technologies are a

    barrier for interaction between the product and the producer. The

    map exemplifies the steps of the production and sales of the olive oil

    clustered in four main stages.PLANTING

    GROWING

    TREATING

    COMPRESSING

    HARVESTING

    CRUSHING

    DE-LEAFING

    STORING

    LABELLING

    SELLING

    TASTING

    CLEANING

    FARMING PRODUCING PACKAGING MARKETING

    HUMAN INTERACTION

    MACHINEINTERACTION

  • 33

    VISUAL MAP OF NATURELife Cycle of Raw Material

    Formatted as an annual calendar, the map uses the four

    seasons as a base. Each product is represented in its own

    color and placed on the map according to when its existence

    begins in nature. The closer to the middle, the less impact the

    process has. The olive trees for the oil (green) are planted in

    spring, along with the fruit trees for the candy (pink) and the

    grape vines (purple) for the wine. The goats which produce

    the milk for the cheese (yellow) are productive all year round

    in an endless cycle.

    Artisans Effort Toward the Product

    Mirroring nature, the seasons are the base of the map.

    The colors represent the same products as in the nature map,

    however the patterns are different.

    For the candy, the process begins small in the winter, swells in

    the spring and shrinks again in the summer. This shows that

    the artisans step into the picture in the winter to begin their

    part of the process and work the hardest in the spring, slowing

    again in the summer. After the grapes for the wine are fully

    mature, the artisans begin their labor at harvest and make the

    wine in the fall. Olives for the olive oil are also harvested in

    the fall, and the oil itself is produced by the artisans in late fall,

    early winter. Just like the goat cheese on the nature map, the

    cheese production is also on an annual cycle.

    I have been working for 30 years.

    No holidays.

    Michelline Perrier

    The winter prepares me mentally for next year.

    Theres time, its more quiet. Spring, you fight the

    herb and work the ground in the vineyard. I also

    work in the cave washing bottles, putting labels

    on wine. the Summers are hot and I try to sell

    because of the holiday season. The grapes are

    picked in September and then the wine is made.

    Matthieu Ronchi

    The blooms begin to grow in May. Only 510%

    of the blooms actually produce olives. The

    olives begin to grow in Summer and change

    color from purple to black in September.

    Harvesting begins in mid-October and ends in

    November before the weather gets too cold.

    Catherine Hugues

    LIFE CYCLE OF RAW MATERIAL

    ARTISANS EFFORT TOWARDS THE PRODUCT

    ONE FULL YEAR

    ONE FULL YEAR

    Fruits

    Fruits

    Grapes

    Grapes

    Olives

    Olives

    Cheese

    Cheese

  • 34

    PRODUCT GRAPHOlive Oil Fromage Wine Candied Fruit

    Background

    Time Input

    ProductionScale

    Craftmanship

    Experience

    Export Local International

    Traditonal Methods

    IndustrialMethods

    LimitedYield

    IndustrialScale

    Seasonally Daily

    Learn fromPast

    Field ofStudy

    Self Made Inherited

    This graph shows and compares four products that are important to

    the Provenal region. Each category on the y-axis shows a different

    way of classifying each product. Where each dot falls on the

    corresponding x-axis creates a visual way in which to see how the

    different products relate to one another throughout their production

    processes. Each line has two extremes relevant to its own category.

    The placement of each products corresponding dot is based off the

    generalization of qualitative information collected from a variety of

    participants.

    Castelas is a husband-wife-owned company.We

    started the company from scratch and have constantly

    been reinvesting in it and making sure it is kept at the

    highest standard.

    Catherine Hugues

    I pay attention to capacity for

    production. Quality over quantity.

    Michelline Perrier

  • 35

    PROCESS REPORTAs we completed our interviews, observations and participatory

    experiences, we placed these data on a giant working wall.

    In order to make sense of this plethora of quotes, notations,

    and photographs, we absorbed and subsequently distilled the

    information into sticky notes. Layered atop the working wall, these

    sticky notes served as summary items from which the next round of

    data mapping could take place. Each researcher created two visual

    models they felt represented the situation, and we then reconvened

    to compare and discuss these models. Out of this discussion, we

    developed a subset of these sketches further in order to formulate

    a comprehensible narrative of our data. After bringing these diverse

    visual perspectives to the front, we revisited our original working

    wall and re-affinitized the data until categorical insights emerged.

    The following section elaborates upon these insights and the

    opportunities we derived from them.

  • 36

    AFFINITY DIAGRAMInteractive processes

    Techniques

    TechnologyLearning about

    the craft

    Changing business

    Education

    Highly educated

    Working into the future

    Taste

    Presentation

    Samples

    ShowingDisplays

    Senses

    Quiet

    Variety

    Wind

    Calendar

    DrySeasonal change

    InteractionProduction

    Modernization

    Use of machinery

    History

    Family

    CommunityCulinary traditions

    Independent

    Holistic conditions

    Knowledge

    Experience within context

    SeasonsFamily Is important

    WORKING WALL

  • 37

    SYNTHESISContextual Research of Nature, Culture & Food Artisanship in Provence, France

  • 38

    Contextual Experience

    Perception of involvement in the process of product creation is

    valuable.

    The experience of a product within its appropriate context is crucial.

    The artisanal producers were eager to share their methods, and

    customers appreciated a story with full sensory experience. Having

    samples to evoke smell and taste as accompaniments to a visual

    and auditory runthrough of the creation process leads to a more

    fulfilling consumption experience, in that it lends an impression of

    deeper connection with people (the artisan) and time (the traditions

    they espouse).

    There is an opportunity to:Blur the currently crisp boundary between producers

    and consumers of goods.

    Extend the consumer experience into a wider range

    of senses (gustatory, olfactory, visual and even

    temporal).

    Align the consumption of products with their ideal

    contexts.

    How might we:How might we involve the consumer in the

    production process of artisanal goods?

    How might we introduce new senses into the

    consumer experience, or make higher quality use of

    the time they spend throughout that experience?

    How might we match the consumption of products

    within their context(s)?

    Potential design ideas or scenarios:Create interactive tours in which the consumer

    becomes directly involved in one or more phases

    of the physical production process (packaging,

    planting, processing, sorting, distributing, etc.)

    To enhance the consumption of the product, alter

    packaging to evoke notions of the ideal scenario in

    which to consume the product.

    Create a service that takes your context and

    surprises you with food that matches that context.

    Instead of bringing the consumer to the context of

    the product, this service would consider the context

    of the individual and deliver an appropriate product

    to their location (e.g. were at the beach might

    result in watermelon).

    INSIGHT 1Everyone in the tour was curiously looking around,

    tasting the different samples that were offered to us.

    By the end of the tour they had a table full of a great

    variety of sweets for us to taste. Also, they had a small

    fondue station to dip the fruit in.

    AptUnion Tour Observation

    Bread changes as you go

    north. Here in Provence its

    blotting paper to soak up the

    olive oil and garlic.

    Finn McEoin

    Also some treatment with copper and sulfur on

    leaves with the tractor, could buy a horse for

    that, but that would mostly just be for fun, and to

    look nice for tourists.

    Matthieu Ronchi

  • 39

    ARTISANSPROCESS

    PRODUCT CONSUMERS

    BUY FROMCREATES

    RAWMATERIAL

    INSIGHT 1 MAP

  • 40

    Holistic Conditions

    Until the necessary systemic conditions emerge, neither process

    nor production scale alter.

    The implementation of new knowledge was dependent on

    systemic conditions such as social networks, cultural pressure and

    environmental serendipity. By this we mean that artisans relied

    upon the support of people they felt close to (e.g. family, neighbors,

    teachers) before adopting new production techniques. There is

    also an artisan reliance upon nature; there must be systemic

    environmental cooperation between the conditions regarding

    water, temperature, wind, bugs, etc. in order for the natural sources

    of artisanal food products (vines, trees, bushes, goats, etc.) to

    thrive.

    There is an opportunity to:Acknowledge artisanal food products reliance on

    systemic readiness.

    Indirectly influence artisanship through upstream

    interventions directed at systemic conditions.

    How might we:How might we recognize that evolution of the

    artisanal food products and processes is dependent

    on integral conditions?

    How might we positively influence the artisanal

    process indirectly by modifying certain systemic

    conditions?

    Potential design ideas or scenarios:Create new codes and regulations to broaden the

    geographic relevance of French product standards

    (e.g. agriculture biologique label in the US that is

    fluidly linked to the exact standards of France.)

    Offer a community college course focusing on the

    processes and regulations that contribute to defining

    Provenal goods.

    INSIGHT 2

    French cuisine was totally changed by

    Catherine Medici. She was probably

    Frances best import. Ever.

    Finn McEoin

    Little by little, young people

    come to do hand made.

    Matthieu Ronchi

    Terrior soil has its own properties and conditions

    (alkalinity)...sunshine can affect flavor.people buy the

    Provence brand.

    Florence Thurston

  • 41

    Family

    Family is considered to be of the utmost importance.

    All of the samples we spoke with mentioned one or more family

    members as central to their own position. While factors such as the

    high cost of living or a culturally instilled responsibility to support

    ones parents could contribute to the practice of older children

    living at home, it could be that this insight is as straightforward as it

    appears: people simply love their families.

    There is an opportunity to:Tap into existing familial connections to deepen

    economic or more peripherally social relationships.

    Convey the fulfilment artisans receive from their

    familial relations more obviously in the products.

    How might we:How might we broaden economic networks through

    genealogy?

    How might we demonstrate the value of family within

    their products?

    Potential design ideas or scenarios:Create labels that display more heritage and

    genealogy regarding a products past (e.g. the

    people who made and shaped the product).

    Create an environment that allows for an intimate

    relationship between the consumer and the producer

    which thoroughly explains the values, challenges,

    history, and goals of the artisan.

    Strategically assign artisanal producers homework:

    Have them do a book report on their own family,

    summarized in a single page (showing what they

    value, where the came from, what they learned from

    their challenges.)

    INSIGHT 3Learned winemaking from father (and sister):

    learned all together, begin with little quantity, then

    scale, then bring in technical logistics consultant, do

    analysis on wine.

    Matthieu Ronchi

    I like to go fishing and stroll with

    my family in the mountains.

    Antoine

    Came back to France to raise children

    and decided to start olive farming.

    Catherine Hugues

  • 42

    Wind

    Wind has deep cultural and agricultural implications.

    The winds in the Provenal region are not only important for

    agricultural processes such as the pollination of olive trees, but also

    occupy a place in common conversation amongst locals. Named

    winds (the mistral, sirocco, levant and tramontane) blow across

    this area, some of which are enshrined in traditional objects (e.g. le

    santon figure holding his hat against the mistral wind) or common

    phrases (e.g. levant blanc indicating good weather).

    There is an opportunity to:Elevate citizens awareness and cultural appreciation

    of their regions wind patterns.

    Harness the power of wind as renewable energy.

    How might we:How might we facilitate the cultural claiming of

    regional winds and cycles?

    How might we capture wind energy to directly

    power mechanical or electrical artisanal production

    equipment?

    Potential design ideas or scenarios:Use the wind and its directional paths as a way to

    calculate the passage of time or change in season.

    Create wind harnessing methods that mechanically

    translate wind energy to directly power artisanal

    production equipment.

    INSIGHT 4The blooms begin to grow in May. Only 510% of

    the blooms actually produce olives. The olives begin

    to grow in summer and change color from purple to

    black in September. The wind helps pollinate.

    Catherine Hugues

    Magistalis (magestics): minestral

    wind that caused them to take off

    their huge hats.

    Finn McEoin

    You learn to read the weather: one

    wind, like the mistral, brings rain.

    Florence Thurston

  • 43

    Expect the Unexpected

    Artisans acknowledge and accept uncertainty with grace.

    The individuals we interviewed drew knowledge from a diverse

    range of sources, but they also expressed reluctance to accept that

    knowledge until they personally validated it via future application.

    Furthermore, they expressed little disappointment in the possibility

    that unforeseen events could cause large-scale losses in any given

    season.

    There is an opportunity to:Facilitate the mindset of flexibility and anticipation

    towards uncertainty in other sectors.

    Balance certain organizations reliance on theory

    with more pragmatic, future-oriented validation of

    ideas.

    How might we:How might we convince individuals to be more open

    towards misfortune and/or foreign ideas?

    How might we convince certain organizations to

    integrate more practical, forward-thinking theories to

    balance currently used ideas?

    Potential design ideas or scenarios:Create a crisis intervention book that has a large

    amount of information on how to recognize certain

    absurd situations and solutions to them.

    Design distributable literature (pamphlets,

    brochures, post cards) that touch on the intricacies

    of traditional practices and inevitable challenges that

    will arise.

    Use music (live or recorded) within a busy and

    stressful environment such as a public transportation

    station to instill a sense of calm.

    INSIGHT 5[About the flies that come sometimes and ruin the

    trees] We have traps in the fields, and everyone

    writes down what they find and share amongst the

    local farmers.

    Catherine Hugues

    I would be as happy or as sad

    elsewhere. You can decide all

    things.

    Matthieu Ronchi

    Snow, rain, I dont care, Im just

    looking for that [buried artifact].

    Jean Pierre Soalhat

  • 44

    Seasons (nature and people)

    Seasons are the overarching driver of food artisans activity.

    While certain seasonal factors might be common knowledge (e.g.

    harvest of grapes and olives occurs in late summer/early fall),

    many other processes also align with seasonal cycles. Summers

    are dry, but also loud because it is the time when tourists inundate

    the Provenal region. Winters are quiet and involve proportionately

    fewer agricultural responsibilities; this is a time for reflection and

    planning. Occupying alternate mindsets in this seasonally cyclic

    manner appears to be one characterization of the Provenal food

    artisans we spoke with.

    There is an opportunity to:Visualize full seasonal variation in local climate and

    activity for temporary residents.

    Export some principles of seasonality to areas less

    subject to calendar-year environmental shifts.

    How might we:How might we convey the feeling of a full seasonal

    cycle to visitors or temporary residents?

    How might we reframe the perception of

    unproductive seasons in the minds of non-

    agricultural workers?

    Potential design ideas or scenarios:Organize businesses to work around the changes in

    seasons.

    Create a biodynamic manual to educate new

    farmers about the rotation of crops and cohabitation

    of plants within the seasons to make the most

    natural use of the seasonal cycle.

    Create a series of infographics that draw metaphors

    between seasonal farming patterns and generalized

    business processes, thereby creating an efficient

    cycle.

    INSIGHT 6It beginds in winter, cut the vineyard, prepare wood

    for burning, clean ground, repair the tractor, sell

    the wine too, prepare mentally for next year (new

    direction, changing, new grapes, take up animals or

    not), theres time, its more quiet

    Matthieu Ronchi

    For me, provence, its something

    strong. its a hard life. cold winter,

    hot summer.

    Jean Pierre Soalhat

    Im watching all the time.

    The birds are always changing here.

    The timing, the plants here.

    Finn McEoin

  • 45

    ONE FULL YEAR

    INSIGHT 6 MAP

  • 46

    OPPORTUNITY MAP

    HOLISTICCONDITIONS

    CONTEXTUALEXPERIENCE

    FAMILY

    EXPECT THE UNEXPECTED

    INSIGHT

    OPPORTUNITY

    HEALTHYRELATIONSHIP

    TO CHANGE

    Family

    ContextualExperience

    HolisticConditions

    Expect theUnexpected

    Wind

    I N S I G H T # 1

    I N S I G H T # 6

    I N S I G H T # 5

    I N S I G H T # 3

    I N S I G H T # 4I N S I G H T # 2

    12

    3

    4

    5

    6

    7 8

    Seasons (Nature & People)

    9

    10

    11

    12

    1314

    1. Blur distinction between producer and consumer roles.

    2. Expand sensory engagement.

    3. Align product consumption with ideal context.

    4. Tell stories via product experience.

    5. Accept reliance on system factors.

    6. Influence system outputs indirectly.

    7. Merge familial and economic relationships.

    8. Convey artisans fulfillment from positive relationship with family.

    9. Promote appreciation of local winds.

    10. Harness wind power.

    11. Stay calm.

    12. Validate ideas with testing.

    13. Convey the value of seasonal cycles to visitors.

    14. Emulate natural seasonal work cycles.

    Healthy Relationship to Change

    Our overarching impression of the interrelationship between nature,

    culture, and food artisanship was that is it characterized (at least

    in part) by a healthy relationship to change. Thus, an opportunity

    exists for individuals in different walks of life to assume this

    mentality. When confronted with change, options for responding

    include: resilience, adaptability, and transformability. Ultimately,

    this amounts to accepting and positively experiencing both cyclic

    change and outright uncertainty with grace. The following are

    specific opportunities derived from the insights that emerged from

    our research:

  • 47

    CONCLUSIONUltimately, the insights we developed led us to the realization that

    they all contained a flavor of change. We suspect this healthy

    relationship to change stems from close interaction with nature.

    When confronted with uncertainty and adversity, we found

    Provenal food artisans in acceptance of their dynamic context. An

    appreciation for wind, contextual experience and holistic systems

    indicated that this awareness and positive orientation to dynamic

    conditions is present at multiple natural and social scales. At the

    end of our research study, we asked again, What is the relationship

    between culture, nature and food artisanship in the Provenal

    region of France? Our research indicated that this relationship was

    characterized by constant cycles of change and flexible responses

    to change.

    ADAPTABILITYRESILIENCE

    FLEXIBILITY

    TRANSFORMABILITY

    [based on cul ture fami ly]

    [based on learnings from nature]

    [based on tradi t ion of craf t processes]

    AWARENESS + BEING IN TUNE WITH CONTEXT

    TRADITIONS + NEW WAYS

    ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT UPON

    PRODUCT

    NATURECULTURE

    ARTISANSHIP[craf t ]

    [wor ldviews] [condi t ions]

    1

    7

    2

    3

    5 4

    6

  • 48

    RECOMMENDATIONWhile it may seem like an evasion of specificity, we simply

    recommend that individuals (food artisans or otherwise) consider

    three response modes when confronted with unexpected changes:

    resilience, adaptability and transformability. These responses

    to change consist of maintaining course (despite disturbances),

    appropriately adjusting processes, or completely altering ones

    paradigm, respectively. In short, when change looms, individuals

    should act with intent towards one of these three options.

  • 49

    EXHIBITION POSTERSContextual Research of Nature, Culture & Food Artisanship in Provence, France

  • 50

  • 51

    WHAT IS THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN NATURE, CULTURE, AND FOOD ARTISANSHIP IN THE PROVENAL REGION OF FRANCE?Guided by an interest in human relationships with nature, our research team decided to align academic inquiry with the surrounding environment. We focused our research on the characteristics that define the interrelation-ships between nature, culture, and the cra of food artisanship. Through the process of contextual research, data analysis and synthesis, we gained insights and mapped opportunities for potential future actions.

    NATURE

    CULTURE

    FOODARTISANSHIP

    [ World views ]

    [ Conditions ]

    [ Cra ]

    AWARENESS + BEING IN TUNE WITH CONTEXT

    TRADITIONAL + NEW WAYS

    ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT UPON

    PRODUCT

    SCAD | SCHOOL OF DESIGN | Contextual Research

  • 52

    The main form of our research is defined as a case study. In this research methodology, we explore and describe a bounded system through a limited number of events, conditions and their interrelationships.

    Additionally, our research had a participatory aspect. We recorded and analyzed our direct experiences with the products as we consumed them, engaging all of our senseswith intent.

    RESEARCH METHODOLOGY & DATA COLLECTION

    METHODS

    We also applied an ethnographic lens to our investigation, observing artisans in their natural environment in order to sense their relationship with their surroundings. Essentially, we wanted to know how people lead their lives.

    CASE STUDY PARTICIPATORY

    ETHNOGRAPHY

    Our approach to this contextual research project can be characterized as a mixed qualitative methodology.

    QUALITATIVE RESEARCH

    Our data collection methods for primary research included observation, semi-structured interviews, and personal explorations. Prior to this endeavor,

    we sought information about our research question through academic journals, on websites,

    news articles, books, and publicly available videos. This secondary research both underpinned our

    primary research phase, and informed subsequent analysis of the data.

    DATA COLLECTION METHODS

    SCAD | SCHOOL OF DESIGN | Contextual Research

  • 53

    FIELDWORK: PRIMARY RESEARCH PROCESS

    Luberon, we are one of the best parts of Provence.

    Quality of life. It is tranquil and peaceful...My friends say I live in the middle of nowhere

    and I love it!

    REGION OFPROVENCE

    PRIMARY RESEARCHDuring the primary research phase, we collected data directly from our locale. For reasons of consistency, we all used the same field guides. We held interviews with local artisans and consumers, observed environments, processes, and interactions, and personally evaluated products. Thus, the outcome of our primary research is a set of descriptions addressing our focus question from various perspectives. This rich data informed our next steps and ultimately led to the emergenceof our insights.

    ...What makes the product unique is how the cheese is fabricated.

    I love to take care of my goats. I am happy

    everyday...I am also very happy when I take a shower,

    when I am tired.

    Castelas olive oil business

    Font Leale small winery

    Fromages small goat farm

    Aptunion manufacture of candied fruits

    Gargantuapt small wine store

    Leonidas a small gourmet candy store

    J.C. Rousset small family-oriented candy store

    Chteau La Coste vineyard with large, outdoor installations

    APTLACOSTE

    LES BAUXLE PUY-SAINTE-REPARDE

    SCAD | SCHOOL OF DESIGN | Contextual Research

  • 54

    DATA MAPSVISUALIZING INFORMATION

    LOCAL INTERNATIONAL

    TRADITIONALMETHODS

    INDUSTRIALMETHODS

    LIMITED YIELD MAXIMUM YIELD

    MONTHLY DAILY

    LEARN FROM PAST FIELD OF STUDY

    SELF MADE INHERITED

    TIME INPUT

    PRODUCTIONAMOUNT

    CRAFTSMANSHIP

    EXPERIENCE

    EXPORT

    BACKGROUND

    PLANTING

    GROWING

    TREATMENT

    COMPRESSING

    HARVESTING

    CRUSHING

    DE-LEAFING

    STORAGE

    LABELLING

    SELLING

    TASTING

    CLEANING

    FARMING PRODUCTION PACKAGING MARKETING

    HUMAN INTERACTION

    MACHINEINTERACTION

    LIFE CYCLE OF RAW MATERIAL

    ARTISANS EFFORT TOWARDS THE PRODUCT

    COMPARISON OF PRODUCTS FACETS

    PRODUCT JOURNEY

    As we completed our interviews, observations and participatory experiences, we placed these data on a giant working wall. In order to make sense of this plethora of quotes, notations and photographs, we absorbed and subsequently distilled the information into sticky notes. Layered atop the working wall, these sticky notes served as summary items from which the next round of data mapping could take place. Each researcher created two visual models they felt represented the situation, and we then reconvened to compare and discuss these models. Out of this discussion,we developed a subset of these sketches further in order to formulate a comprehensible narrative of our data.

    ONE FULL YEAR

    ONE FULL YEAR

    SCAD | SCHOOL OF DESIGN | Contextual Research

  • 55

    INSIGHTS REPORT

    Aer making meaning of the data, we revisited our original working wall and re-ainitized the information until categorical insights emerged.

    DISCOVERING INSIGHTS

    HOLISTIC CONDITIONSUntil the necessary systemic conditions emerge, neither process nor production scale of the artisans product alter.

    FAMILYFamily is considered to be of the utmost importance.

    WINDWind has deep cultural and agricultural implications.

    EXPECT THE UNEXPECTEDArtisans acknowledge and accept uncertainty with grace.

    PRESENTED TO

    INSIGHTS

    CONTEXTUAL EXPERIENCE

    Perception of involvement in the process of product

    creation is valuable.

    SEASONS (NATURE & PEOPLE)Seasons are the overarching driver of food artisans activity.

    ARTISANSPROCESS

    PRODUCT CONSUMERS

    BUY FROM

    SCAD | SCHOOL OF DESIGN | Contextual Research

  • 56

    OPPORTUNITY MAP

    CONCLUSIONUltimately, the insights we developed led us to

    the realization that they all contained a flavor of change. We suspect this healthy relationship to

    change stems from close interaction with nature. When confronted with uncertainty and adversity, we found Provenal food artisans in

    acceptance of their dynamic context. An appreciation for wind, contextual experience

    and holistic systems indicated that this awareness and positive orientation to dynamic

    conditions is present at multiple natural and social scales. At the end of our research study, we asked, What is the relationship between culture, nature and food artisanship in the Provenal region of France?, our research

    indicated that this relationship was characterized by constant cycles of

    change and response.

    HEALTHYRELATIONSHIPTO CHANGE

    HOLISTICCONDITIONS

    CONTEXTUALEXPERIENCE

    WIND

    FAMILY

    EXPECT THE UNEXPECTED

    SEASONS(NATURE &PEOPLE)

    e.g. Convey seasonal cycles to visitors

    e.g. Convey artisans fulfillment from family

    e.g. Harness wind power

    INSIGHTS

    SCAD | SCHOOL OF DESIGN | Contextual Research

    OPPORTUNITY

  • 57

    APPENDIXContextual Research of Nature, Culture & Food Artisanship in Provence, France

  • 58

    TEAM BIOS

    NATHAN BECK

    I am a person and love to serve people. All my pants

    are too short and I wear flowers in my front pockets.

    I am learning how to be a Service Designer at the

    Savannah College of Art and Design. I am from the

    Sunshine State, so the beach will always be my

    home. Sunflowers bring me joy and butterflies make

    me chuckle.

    ABBIE FRANCISCO

    Im from Rockford, Illinois located near Chicago. I am

    a sophomore at Savannah College of Art and Design

    majoring in Industrial Design and minoring in painting.

    I have always loved both art and nature so being in

    France has been the time of my life. My favorite word

    is caddywhompus and despite the fact that I am tone

    deaf, I will serenade any friendly face that welcomes

    me, too. Rainy days are the best, spiders are the

    worst, and puns make me laugh until I cry.

    MARK HEMPHILL

    I was born and raised in Cary, North Carolina, but

    have been fortunate enough to live in Wisconsin, the

    Netherlands, Portugal, Georgia, and currently France.

    My academic background is math and physics, and I

    worked in the healthcare IT sector prior to enrolling in

    SCADs Industrial Design MFA program. My favorite

    thing is water, and I would argue that the most

    underutilized word in the English language is groak.

  • 59

    KATIE MURRAY

    I was born and raised in Singer Island, Florida.

    I am currently a sophomore at Savannah College of

    Art and Design for Industrial Design. I have always

    been interested in art and design. I dabble in making

    objects and finding out how objects work, and I hope

    to apply those skills to my major.

    MONICA SEGGOS

    I was born in Manhattan and raised in Connecticut.

    I recently completed my Masters in Jewelry and

    Objects at SCAD Savannah and am currently enrolled

    in the Design Management eLearning program.

    Prior to SCAD, I worked in the fashion industry as a

    consultant, with the lifetime dream of becoming an

    artist. As an entrepreneur, I am interested in applying

    design principles to the business of creativity.

    I am enamored by nature. Ever since I was a child, it

    has been the guiding force in my life. SCAD Lacoste

    has been one of the most spectacular natural

    environments that I have ever experienced from the

    wildflowers and birds, to the forests and wild animals.

    RAQUEL SEREBRENIK

    Born in Bogota, Colombia, I have always been

    interested in how art and design affect our daily

    activities. Because of this I decided to study at SCAD.

    I wondered how we can use the past to enhance our

    future so I started studying Art History the past,

    and Design for Sustainability the future. I have

    traveled around the world searching for cultures and

    experiences. Gratefully Provence is one of them.

  • 60

    ISAAC TOONKEL

    I am from a small town of Millbrook, New York,

    located in the Hudson Valley. I am currently a

    sophomore at Savannah College of Art and Design

    majoring in Industrial Design and minoring in Design

    for Sustainability. Being interested in Mechanical

    Engineering, but having a classical approach to

    drawing, made Industrial Design an avenue that just

    seemed right. My admiration for the outdoors and my

    sense of adventure is what led me to study here in

    Lacoste.

    MARCELO TORRES

    I was born in Guayaquil, Ecuador, and have lived

    there most of my life. I also lived in Florida for a year

    when I was 6 years old. Art has interested me since

    I was a young child, and I have always liked to

    draw, but it was not until late in high school that

    I heard about Industrial Design and decided that this

    was exactly what I wanted to study. I am currently

    a sophmore at SCAD and am pursuing a Bachelor

    of Fine Arts degree in Industrial Design as well as

    Business Management and Entrepreneurship and

    Illustration minors. I enjoy outdoor activities, sports,

    music and good conversation.

    NICOLE WALSH

    I was born in Panama, Republic of Panama and

    raised in the Canal Zone area. I moved to United

    States in 2008, where I finished my Bachelors of

    Fine Arts in Digital Animation with my thesis in 3D

    Architectural Rendering at UCF in Orlando, Florida.

    After working in the Interior Design industry for three

    years, I decided to go to SCAD and enroll in their

    Design Management M.A. program. I have a great

    interest in learning about the business world and

    how it interacts with design. I love to cook and highly

    believe that the best part of life happens around a

    dinner table.

  • 61

    RESEARCH PROTOCOLS

    Consent Form 1 Consent Form 2

  • 62

    Probing quest ions 1 Probing quest ions 2

  • 63

    Probing quest ions 3 Probing quest ions 4

  • 64

    Probing quest ions 5 Probing quest ions 6

  • 65

    Probing quest ions 7 Observat ion f ie ld guide cover

  • 66

    Observat ion f ie ld guide 1 Observat ion f ie ld guide 2

  • 67

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    the-country-candied-fruit-of-provence-sweet-tradition.html

    Coffey, R. (2011). The Wine Whisperers. Discover, 32(7), 20-22.

    Contrle. Annals of the Association of American Geographers 94.4 : 848-67. Retrieved from

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    DallOrto, Fernando Antonio Campo, Ojima, Mrio, Barbosa, Wilson, Rigitano, Orlando, Sabino,

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    Demossier, Marion (2011). Beyond Terrior: Territorial Construction, Hegemonic discourse, and

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    Jones, D. L. (1947). A Geographic Survey of the French Economy. American Journal of

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    microhabitats differentially influence seedling phenology of two co-existing Mediterranean

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    Preston, D. (2008). Viticulture and Winemaking in Contemporary Rural Change: Experience

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    Rogers, S. C. (2002). Which Heritage? Nature, Culture, and Identity in French Rural

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    Rosenthal, Jean-Laurent (Jun. 1990) The Fruits of Revolution: Property Rights, Litigation,

    and French Agriculture, 1700-1860, The Journal of Economic History, Vol. 50, No. 2 , pp.

    438-440. Retrieved from http://www.jstor.org/stable/2123287.

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    Research, 17(1), 1-10.

    BIBLIOGRAPHY

    INTRODUCTIONRESEARCH DESIGN & PLANNINGFRAMINGMETHODOLOGYECO SYSTEM MAPRESEARCH SUBQUESTIONSSECONDARY RESEARCH

    PROJECT MATRIXTIMELINEFIELDWORKOVERVIEW LOCATION MAPOBSERVATIONSNOTE TAKINGPARTICIPATORY EVALUATIONMULTI-SENSORY OBSERVATIONSSEMI-STRUCTURED INTERVIEWSSAMPLES

    WORKING WALLS (Final)WORKING WALLSPROBING QUESTIONSRESEARCH PROTOCOLANALYSISWORD CLOUDOLIVE PRODUCT JOURNEY MAPVISUAL MAP OF NATUREPRODUCT GRAPHPROCESS REPORTAFFINITY DIAGRAM

    SYNTHESISINSIGHT 1INSIGHT 1 MAPINSIGHT 2INSIGHT 3INSIGHT 4INSIGHT 5INSIGHT 6INSIGHT 6 MAPOPPORTUNITY MAPCONCLUSIONRECOMMENDATION

    EXHIBITION POSTERSAPPENDIXBIBLIOGRAPHY