Conclusion Teaching strategies demonstrates understanding of the interrelationships between language modes.

  • Published on
    24-Dec-2015

  • View
    213

  • Download
    1

Embed Size (px)

Transcript

  • Slide 1
  • Conclusion Teaching strategies demonstrates understanding of the interrelationships between language modes.
  • Slide 2
  • Rationale The study of English is central to the learning and development of all young Australians. 1. Confident communicators 2. Imaginative thinkers 3. Informed citizens
  • Slide 3
  • Build relationships with others and with the world around them. Analyse, understand, communicate
  • Slide 4
  • Slide 5
  • Language modes Language modes are based on the idea that communication cannot occur without responding and composing The language modes categorise the different types of skills involved in responding and composing. There are three groups of language modes. 1. reading and writing 2. listening and speaking 3. viewing and representing.
  • Slide 6
  • Teaching strategies 1 st step = Modelling = I do 2 nd step = Shared/Guided = We do 3 rd step = Independent= They do
  • Slide 7
  • References Brady, L. (2006). Collaborative learning in action. Frenchs Forest, NSW: Pearson Education Australia. Cohen, L., Manion, L. & Morrison, K. (2004). A guide to teaching practice. London: Routledge Farmer. Edwards-Groves, C. (2002). Connecting students to learning through explicit teaching. Retrieved from http://www.myread.org/scaffolding\ Killen, R. (2009). Effective teaching strategies: Lessons from research and practice. (5th ed.). South melbourne, VIC: Cengage Learning Australia. Marzano, R.J. & Pickering, D.J. (1997). Dimensions of learning: Teachers manual (2 nd ed.). Colorado, US: McREL. McInerney, D., & McInerney, V. (2006). Educational psychology: Constructing learning. (4th ed.). Frenchs Forest, NSW:Pearson. Anstey, M., & Bull, G. (2004). The literacy labyrinth. (2nd ed.). Frenchs Forest: Pearson. Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority (ACARA). (2011). The Australian curriculum: English. Version 1.2. Retrieved 8 th March 2011 from www.australiancurriculum.edu.au Callaghan, M., & Rothery, J. (1988). Teaching factual writing: A genre based approach. Sydney: Metropolitan East Region, Department of Education. Derewianka, B. (1998). A grammar companion. Newtown, NSW: Primary English Teaching Association. Winch, G., Johnston, R. R., March, P., Ljungdahl, L., & Holliday, M. (2006). Literacy: Reading, writing and children's literature (3rd ed.). South Melbourne, Vic: Oxford University Press. Wing Jan, L. (2009). Write ways: Modelling writing forms (3 rd ed.). South Melbourne, VIC: Oxford.
  • Slide 8
  • Anstey, M., & Bull, G. (2004). The literacy labyrinth. (2nd ed.). Frenchs Forest: Pearson. Cope, B., & Kalantzis, M. (1993). The powers of literacy: A genre approach to teaching writing. London: The Falmer Press. Hammond, J., & Gibbons, P. (2001). What is scaffolding? In J. Hammond (Ed.), Scaffolding: Teaching and learning in language and literacy education (pp. 1-14). Newtown: Primary English Teaching Association. Harris, P., Mckenzie, B., Fitzsimmons, P., & Turbill, J. (2003). Writing in the primary school years. Tuggerah, NSW: Social Science Press. Jones, P. (1996). Planning an oral language program. In P. Jones (Ed.),Talking to learn (11-26). Newtown: Primary English Teaching Association. Winch, G., Johnston, R. R., March, P., Ljungdahl, L., & Holliday, M. (2004). Literacy: Reading, writing and children's literature (2nd ed.). South Melbourne, Vic: Oxford University Press. Wing Jan, L. (2009). Write ways: Modelling writing forms (3 rd ed.). South Melbourne, VIC: Oxford.

Recommended

View more >