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Comp Conc

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Text of Comp Conc

  • 1. Internet and LAN Technology C HAPTER 5
  • 2. Chapter Contents
    • Section A: Network Building Blocks
    • Section B: Local Area Networks
    • Section C: Internet Technology
    • Section D: Internet Access
  • 3. Section A: Network Building Blocks
    • Network Advantages and Challenges
    • Network Classifications
    • Geographic Scope: PANs, NANs, LANs, MANs, and WANs
    • Organizational Structure: Client/Server and Peer-to-Peer
    • Physical Topology
  • 4. Section A: Network Building Blocks
    • Network Links
    • Analog and Digital Signals
    • Bandwidth
    • Communications Protocols
  • 5. Network Advantages and Challenges
    • Sharing networked hardware can reduce costs
    • Sharing networked hardware can provide access to a wide range of services and specialized peripheral devices
    • Sharing networked software can reduce costs
    • Sharing data on a network is easy
    • Networks enable people to work together regardless of time and place
  • 6. Network Advantages and Challenges
    • Networks may be vulnerable to unauthorized access from many sources and locations
      • More vulnerable than standalone computers
    • Wireless networks can be tapped from a snooping computer
    • Networked computers are susceptible to an increasing number of worms, Trojan horses, and blended threats
  • 7. Network Classifications
  • 8. Geographical Scope: PANs, NANs, LANs, MANs, and WANs
    • Personal Area Network (PAN) interconnection of personal digital devices
    • Neighborhood Area Network (NAN) connectivity spread over several buildings
    • Local Area Network (LAN) usually connects computers in a single building
    • Metropolitan Area Network (MAN) public high-speed network with range of about 50 miles
    • Wide Area Network (WAN) consists of several smaller networks
  • 9. Organizational Structure: Client/Server and Peer-to-Peer
  • 10. Physical Topology
    • Arrangement of devices in a network
    • Each connection point on a network is referred to as a node
    • A bridge can connect two similar networks
    • A gateway joins two dissimilar networks
      • Router
  • 11. Physical Topology
  • 12. Physical Topology
  • 13. Network Links
    • Wired network
      • Twisted-pair cable
      • Coaxial cable
      • Fiber-optic cable
    • Wireless network
      • RF signals
      • Microwaves
      • Infrared light
  • 14. Analog and Digital Signals
  • 15. Bandwidth
    • The transmission capacity of a communications channel
      • High-bandwidth channel (broadband)
        • Cable TV
        • DSL
      • Low-bandwidth channel (narrowband)
        • Telephone system
  • 16. Communications Protocols
    • Rules for efficiently transmitting data from one network node to another
      • Dividing messages into packets
      • Affixing addresses to packets
      • Initiating transmission
      • Regulating the flow of data
      • Checking for transmission errors
      • Acknowledging receipt of transmitted data
  • 17. Communications Protocols
    • A packet is a parcel of data that is sent across a computer network
      • Circuit-switching technology vs. packet switching technology
        • Voice over IP (VoIP)
  • 18. Section B: Local Area Networks
    • LAN Standards
    • Ethernet
    • Wi-Fi
    • HomePNA and HomePLC Networks
    • Installing a LAN
    • Using a LAN
  • 19. LAN Standards
    • LAN Technologies are standardized by the IEEE
      • ARCnet
      • Token Ring technology
      • FDDI
      • Ethernet
      • Wi-Fi
  • 20. Ethernet
    • Simultaneously broadcasts data packets to all network devices
      • IEEE 802.3
      • CSMA/CD protocol
  • 21. Ethernet On an Ethernet, data travels on a first come, first served basis. If two workstations attempt to send data at the same time, a collision occurs. That data must be resent. CLICK TO START
  • 22. Ethernet
    • Varies in speed from 10 Mbps to 10 Gbps
    • An Ethernet card is designed to support the Ethernet protocols
    • Ethernet hubs link workstations via cables
      • Uplink port
  • 23. Wi-Fi
    • Wireless networking technologies that are compatible with Ethernet
  • 24. Wi-Fi
    • WEP (Wired Equivalent Privacy) encrypts data traveling over wireless networks
    • Equipment required for a wireless network
      • Wi-Fi card
      • Wireless access point
    • Bluetooth is a short-range wireless network technology
  • 25. HomePNA and HomePLC Networks
    • HomePNA networks utilize existing telephone wiring to connect network devices
      • Special NICs and cables are required
    • HomePLC networks transmit data over power lines as low-frequency radio waves
  • 26. Installing a LAN CLICK TO START
  • 27. Using a LAN In this drive mapping example, a servers drive C is mapped as drive F by a workstation. After the mapping is complete, the servers hard disk appears in the workstations directory as drive F and can be used just as though it were a drive connected

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