Community Payments for Ecosystem Services (PES)

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<p>Plan Vivo Project Idea note (PIN)</p> <p>Community PESCommunity Payments for Ecosystem Services (PES) in the Congo Basin</p> <p>08 July 2010</p> <p>1</p> <p>Table of contents1 Project objectives, intervention, activities ............................................................................................................ 2 1.1 Objectives ........................................................................................................................................................ 2 Intervention ................................................................................................................................................................... 2 1.2 1.3 1.4 2 2.1 2.2 3 3.1 3.2 3.3 3.4 3.5 4 5 Scale ................................................................................................................................................................. 2 Activities ........................................................................................................................................................... 3 Time-line .......................................................................................................................................................... 4 Nkolenyeng ...................................................................................................................................................... 5 Nomedjoh ........................................................................................................................................................ 5 Nkolenyeng physical environment ............................................................................................................... 5 Nkolenyeng socioeconomic environment ................................................................................................... 7 Nomedjoh physical environment .................................................................................................................. 7 Nomedjoh socio-economic environment ..................................................................................................... 9 Relevant national governance structures in Cameroon ............................................................................ 9</p> <p>Target groups/communities ................................................................................................................................... 5</p> <p>Description of project area ..................................................................................................................................... 5</p> <p>Ownership of carbon rights and land tenure ....................................................................................................... 9 Description of applicant organisation(s) and proposed governance structure ............................................. 10 5.1 5.2 5.3 Communities ................................................................................................................................................. 10 Project coordinator ....................................................................................................................................... 10 Project development support ...................................................................................................................... 13</p> <p>6 7 8 9</p> <p>Community-led design plan ................................................................................................................................. 13 Additionality analysis ............................................................................................................................................ 13 Compliance with regulations and notification of relevant bodies ................................................................... 16 Sources of start-up funding .................................................................................................................................. 16</p> <p>Appendix A: Notification of relevant bodies National Seminar............................................................................. 17 Appendix B: Notification of relevant bodies follow-up letters ............................................................................... 20</p> <p>2</p> <p>1 Project objectives, intervention, activities1.1 ObjectivesThe overarching goal of the Community PES Project is to positively assist communities of Cameroon, and potentially the broader Congo Basin region, to protect forest resources by finding ways to integrate payments for ecosystem services (PES) and community forest management. The specific objectives are to: Maintain forest cover, and thereby maintain carbon stocks, biodiversity and the capacity of forests to provide products, protect watersheds, and prevent soil erosion Improve and strengthen community forest management by equipping communities with the knowledge and capacity to manage and protect their environmental assets Provide alternative income generating activities that help alleviate poverty and improve livelihoods and the ability of communities to cope with institutional, economic and natural resource changes Help develop technical capacity at all levels and support the reform or formulation of appropriate national community forestry legislation and institutions across the region Derive practical lessons for future community-based REDD initiatives and feed these into relevant regional and international REDD policy processes</p> <p>InterventionThe land-use intervention that will generate Plan Vivo Certificates is avoided deforestation. To reduce the threat of deforestation and forest degradation it is necessary to strengthen the capacity of communities to manage their forests effectively over the longer-term. This requires a significant emphasis on complementary income generating activities and practices that do not threaten forest cover, such as improvements in agroforestry and more sustainable agriculture, and enhanced production, extraction and marketing of non timber forest products (NTFPs). As a result of the project intervention, the structure and composition of native forest ecosystems will be maintained and potentially improved, and indigenous tree and plant species will be conserved.</p> <p>1.2 ScaleThis Community PES project is a pilot project of the Congo Basin Forest Fund (CBFF). It will result in a full pilot PES project at the Nkolenyeng Community Forest (the primary project site) and the partial establishment of a secondary project at the Nomedjoh Community Forest (the secondary project site). The Nkolenyeng Community Forest is approximately 1,042 hectares. Its core population is about 555 inhabitants and rises to as many as 700 people during the cocoa season. As of February 2010, 117 volunteers have been identified and involved in project activities. The Nomedjoh Community Forest is approximately 1,942 hectares. A recent census estimates the population of Nomedjoh to be 896 inhabitants, including those in forest camps in the surrounding forest. As of February 2010, over 100 volunteers have been identified for project activities. The process for recruiting volunteers is ongoing. Our expectation is that with the funding available, it will be possible to run PES-funded project activities at Nkolenyeng and Nomedjoh for a 5 year period. If further money were secured for PES, the project could be scaled up by either extending the time-frame of the project or extending the project concept to additional</p> <p>3</p> <p>community forests.</p> <p>1.3 ActivitiesThe project intervention comprises four categories of project activity: 1. Forest protection and regeneration (activity stream to directly protect forest) Forest reserve zoning and boundary marking Community awareness raising and training about the forest reserve zone Patrolling and monitoring Increasing tree cover, enrichment planting. Tree planting in old fallows, new fallows, cocoa farms, and fields Reduced tree felling. Reopening abandoned fallows and avoiding new clearance, lengthening fallows, retention of forest cover when opening new fields, reduced fallow clearance and burning training, controls on logging, approval process for agricultural expansion, monitoring and mapping of agricultural expansion Improved agriculture. Crop mixtures, multi-level cropping, new crops, green manure, improved tillage and plantain propagation, agricultural intensification / permaculture training Improved cocoa production. Pruning of dead/diseased branches, burying of diseased cocoa pods, planting new rootstock, grafting new higher yielding/more disease resistant varieties, more efficient/effective crop spraying, improved drying and storing techniques. Improved agroforestry. Fruit trees, shade trees, nitrogen fixers, community nurseries for citrus and forest trees Beekeeping training, hive construction, training in the marketing of honey Improved collection and marketing of moabi, wild mango, mbalaka Fish farming Mushroom growing</p> <p>2. Sustainable forest use and management (activity stream to directly protect forest)</p> <p>3. Sustainable agriculture (activity stream to support forest protection) </p> <p>4. NTFP income activities (activity stream to support forest protection) </p> <p>4</p> <p>1.4 Time-lineA number of milestones will be achieved before validation. The table below shows these milestones.Table 1: Project development milestones</p> <p>Milestone</p> <p>Status (as of July 2010)</p> <p>Date to reach milestone</p> <p>Research and design Project coordination structures and roles established and processes implemented Planning, preparation and project design for two pilot sites Capacity strengthening and awareness raising in communities PIN written Activities designed by communities (facilitated by project coordinator) Volunteers identified and involved in activities (Nkolenyeng and Nomedjoh) Technical specification written (Nkolenyeng) Management plan, project design document, written (Nkolenyeng) Community governance structure in place (Nkolenyeng) Site-specific financial and administrative systems and processes established (Nkolenyeng) First PES service agreement signed with community (Nkolenyeng) First PES negotiated and delivered to community (Nkolenyeng) Increase number of community members involved in the project (Nkolenyeng) Project development partner (BioClimate) role limited to being available for advice when required Project coordinator (CED) operating autonomously Project validated under Plan Vivo after one annual cycle of activity</p> <p>Achieved Achieved Achieved Ongoing Achieved Achieved Achieved Progressing Progressing Progressing Progressing Progressing Progressing Progressing Progressing Progressing Progressing August 2010 August 2010 September 2010 September 2010 October 2010 November 2010 November 2010 December 2010 December 2010 December 2010 September 2010</p> <p>5</p> <p>2 Target groups/communitiesTarget groups involved in this project are the community members of the villages of Nkolenyeng and Nomedjoh, both of which have community forests.</p> <p>2.1 NkolenyengNkolenyeng is a well established, predominantly agricultural community. Its core population is about 555 inhabitants and rises to as many as 700 people during the cocoa season, particularly the harvesting and sales period towards the end of the calendar year. The community consists mainly of Bantu people belonging to the Fang ethnic group, and also has a small community of Baka people. Seasonal itinerant workers also work in the cocoa plantations and live in the village. The Nkolenyeng community possesses stable leadership and organisational capacity at various levels. It has demonstrated an ability to act co-operatively. Common initiative groups (GICs) are important community structures. In these groups, labour is pooled, and harvested products are sold in quantity to take advantage of the benefits of larger-scale selling. The primary objective of these groups is to improve production and sales of agricultural products and NTFPs.</p> <p>2.2 NomedjohNomedjoh is predominantly a Baka1 community, with a strong tradition of hunter-gathering combined with a growing emphasis on agriculture. Its population is about 896 inhabitants. The community is in state of transition from a nomadic, forest-dwelling lifestyle to a settled one in which community members remain in the village throughout most of the year. Organisational capacity of the Nomedjoh community in a formal sense is not strong, and experience in dealing with finance and enterprise is limited. The culture is dualistic, with traditional cultural values and practices coexisting sometimes uneasily with new and emergent lifestyle aspects, attitudes and views. A dichotomy in attitudes between young and old places strains on social cohesion.</p> <p>3 Description of project area3.1 Nkolenyeng physical environmentProject location The Nkolenyeng Community Forest is part of the Djoum Sub-Division of Dja and Lobo in the Southern Region of Cameroon. The area of the Nkolenyeng Community forest is approximately 1,042 hectares.1</p> <p>The term Pygmies is often used to denote people belonging to the Baka and related ethnic groups. It is sometimes considered to be a pejorative term, but it is also often the term Baka people apply to themselves.</p> <p>6</p> <p>Figure 1: Location of Nkolenyeng Community Forest</p> <p>Physical description of the land, land use and land cover types The general forest type is mixed evergreen and deciduous humid forest. Some areas of forest are permanently flooded, while others are well drained. Forest cover is mostly dense, except in areas where there have been clearances for fields and where village tracks are located. Land use and land cover types The Nkolenyeng Community Forest has been stratified as follows: Futf relatively undisturbed forest Mff Afane degraded forest which has been logged for commercial purposes Ekotok regenerating forest with fallows and crop areas Zam permanently flooded forest Banana plantations and newly opened cocoa fields fields planted with bananas and areas that have been recently cleared and inter-planted with cocoa trees Agricultural fields areas currently under cultivation with food crops Cocoa plantations Established cocoa plantations under the cover of large trees</p> <p>Forest degradation processes, trends &amp; main drivers The principal driver of deforestation and forest degradation is clearance of land to establish mixed agricultural fields for subsistence and commercial use. The establishment of new (variously shaded) cocoa fields as well as banana fields for subsistence and commercial purposes are activities that result in thinning or more substantive removal of forest cover.</p> <p>7</p> <p>3.2 Nkolenyeng socioeconomic environmentDescription of cultural and socioeconomic context A recent census estimates the population of Nkolenyeng to be 555 inhabitants, 56% of whom are women. Young people under the age of 20 make up 60% of the population. There are two distinct ethnic groups present in...</p>

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