Commitment to Climate Justice Commitment to Climate Justice Commitment to Climate Justice AktsAm/sida

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  • Commitment to Climate Justice

    www.sida.se

    AktsAm/sida Partnership Forum, 2009Commitment to Climate Justice

    sWEDIsH INtERNAtIONAL DEVELOPmENt COOPERAtION AGENCY

    Address: sE-105 25 stockholm, sweden. Visiting address: Valhallavägen 199. Phone: +46 (0)8-698 50 00. Fax: +46 (0)8-20 88 64. www.sida.se sida@sida.se

    Sida works according to directives of the Swedish Parliament and Government to reduce poverty in the world, a task that requires cooperation and persistence. Through development cooperation, Sweden assists countries in Africa, Asia, Europe and Latin America. Each country is responsible for its own development. Sida provides resources and develops knowledge, skills and expertise. This increases the world’s prosperity.

  • Commitment to Climate Justice

    www.sida.se

    Sida Civil SoCiety Centre, HärnöSand, Sweden, 26-27 May 2009

  • Commitment to Climate Justice

    Editor: Göran Eklöf, Context

  • Published by Sida 2009

    Editor: Göran Eklöf

    Department: AKSAM/Sida Partnership Forum

    Article number: SIDA52421en

    Printed by Edita, 2009

    Coverphoto: Gunnar Stattin. Dr Agnes Aboum, moderator, Kenya and Gunilla Carlsson, Minister for International Development Cooeration.

    This publication can be downloaded/ordered from www.Sida.se/publications

  • List of abbreviations ..........................................................................5

    Foreword ...............................................................................................7

    Commitment to Climate Justice ..................................................8 Framing the Debate ...........................................................................9 The Commission on Climate Change and Development .................9 Sida’s work on climate change ........................................................11 Civil society perspectives on climate justice .................................11 Beyond Copenhagen: Provocations and solutions ........................13 Closing Session ................................................................................14

    Issues Papers and workshops....................................................16

    Workshop 1 Three Crises: Climate, Energy and Food ......17 1. Overview .......................................................................................17 2. Civil society perspectives, positions, and strategies ............... 23 3. Issues and challenges discussed at the conference ............... 28 Suggested Further Reading ............................................................32 References ....................................................................................... 33

    Workshop 2 Just About the Climate: Climate Change, Human Rights, and Civil Society Engagement .............. 36 1. Introduction to the climate change and human rights nexus .. 36 2. Civil Society Perspectives ..........................................................41 3. The Potential and Challenges of Working with Human Right and Climate Change – a summary of workshop discussions .................................................................................. 44 4. Further information ....................................................................49

    Workshop 3: Carbon, Forests and People ............................51 Forests as important carbon stores ..............................................52 Deforestation and forest degradation ........................................... 53 Forests in the climate change convention .................................... 54 “Do trees grow on money?” Earlier experiences of financing for reducing deforestation ............................................. 56 The underlying causes of deforestation ........................................57 Proposals and strategies in the REDD negotiations .................... 58 Summary of discussions in the workshop .....................................62 Suggested further reading ............................................................. 64

    Contents

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    Workshop 4: Issues for Copenhagen and Beyond ............ 65 1. Background ................................................................................. 65 2. The future of the convention and kyoto protocol .......................67 3. The post-bali process and the road to copenhagen ................. 68 4. Commitments of developed countries .......................................69 5. The role of developing countries ................................................71 6. The link between between global goals and emission reductions of developed and developing countries ..................74 7. Suggested issues for discussion .................................................76 8. Summary of workshop discussions .......................................... 77

    Workshop 5 Addressing Climate Change in CSO North/South Partnerships .......................................................... 80

    Overview ......................................................................................... 80 Commitment to climate justice ..................................................... 82 Civil society perspectives, strategies and tools ........................... 89 Issues and challenges discussed at the conference ................... 90 References: ..................................................................................... 92

  • 5

    List of abbreviations

    AOSIS Alliance of Small Island States AWG adhoc working group (in the UNFCCC negotiations) CAN Climate Action Network CNA Climate Network Africa CDM Clean Development Mechanism CO2 carbon dioxide CO2e carbon dioxide equivalent CLACC Capacity Strengthening in the Least Developed Countries for Adaptation to Climate Change COP Conference of the Parties (to the UNFCCC) CSO civil society organisation EU European Union FAN Forest Action Network FAO United Nations Food and Agriculture Organisation G8 Group of Eight, a forum for the governments of Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, Russia, the United Kingdom, and the United States G20 an economic forum of 19 of the world’s largest economies, plus the EU G77 a negotiating group of 130 developing countries GHG greenhouse gas Gt gigaton (1 billion tonnes) IMF International Monetary Fund IPCC Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change

  • 6

    List of Abbrevations

    IUCN International Union for Conservation of Nature LCA long-term cooperative action (one of the tracks in the UNFCCC negotiations) LCDs least developed countries NGO non-government organisation PACJA Pan Africa Climate Justice REDD reduced deforestation and forest degadation Sida Swedish International Development CooperationAgency TFAP Tropical Forestry Action Plan TWN Third World Network UN United Nations UNCED United Nations Conference on Environment and Development UNDP United Nations Development Programme UNFCCC United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change USD United States dollars WSSD World Summit on Sustainable Development

  • 7

    When Sida Partnership Forum, in autumn 2007, initiated a process – giving possibilities for development partners, mainly CSOs, reflecting on climate change and justice, possible strategies and action for change, it was done with a clear perception of what was at stake.

    If the world doesn´t take action in managing climate change from a rights- based perspective, and with recognizing the common but different responsibi- lities that countries have, we will have a world in which possibilities are few and problems are far too many.

    The double challenge of climate change and development, need to be tackled now, and with the clear ambition to enhance resilience of eco-systems and societies. The effects of man-made climate change and unsustainable practices are here, and with greatest consequences for the world´s poor .

    The process contained two international conferences – held at Sida in Härnösand August 2008 and May 2009 – that gathered 260 participants from all over the world in total, most of them with ongoing engagement and work within civil society, but also those with positions within politics, international organizations, academia and independent think-tanks.

    The message from these conferences is that the world, more than ever, needs an active global civil society with engagement for sustainability. It is only through committed public engagement and co-operation on a global scale, established and unsustainable structures and practices can be moved to change.

    In this publication, the program and issues discussed at the latest confe- rence are presented. We hope that the documentation give further possibilities and inspiration for development partners when working towards Copenhagen and beyond.

    We also hope that this documentation, together with the reports published before and after the first conference, catch some of the spirit and intense dia- logue that we perceived during these process

    June 2009 Dag Jonzon, Sida

    Foreword

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    The last few years have seen a profound increase in the awareness that human induced climate change is a reality and that its consequences will be felt around the world. There is also a growing acceptance of the fact that the impacts of climate change will vary amongst countries. Although this variation may be explained partly through geographic and environmental