CO2 Capture and using Microalgae 2011. 10. 9.¢  ¢â‚¬¯lipid extraction and conversion to biodiesel and

  • View
    0

  • Download
    0

Embed Size (px)

Text of CO2 Capture and using Microalgae 2011. 10. 9.¢  ¢â‚¬¯lipid...

  • Mark Crocker University of Kentucky

    Center for Applied Energy Research (CAER)

    CO2 Capture and Utilization  using Microalgae

  • Energy in Kentucky

    • 92% of KY electricity from coal • KY is 1.4% of US population • KY produces:

    – 2.3% of US electricity – 3.7% of carbon dioxide

    • KY electricity use: – 2.7% of US industrial

    • 35% of US stainless steel production

    • 40% of US aluminum production

    – 1.7% of US residential

  • CO2 Capture and Utilization Using  Microalgae

    • Selection of sulfur-tolerant algae strains, identification of optimum conditions for cultivation/CO2 capture

    • Development of low cost cultivation medium

    • Photobioreactor design

    • Optimization of algae processing: algae recovery, dewatering

    • Algae oil extraction and upgrading to fuel

    • Utilization of algae cake

    Project goals:

  • Media

    Drying

    Dewatering

    Coal Power Plant

    Biomass Fractionation

    Proteins Carbohydrates

    Lipids

    CO2 Lean Gas

    Recovered Nutrients (N,P,K)

    Recovered Media

    Recovered Water

    Algae Cultivation

    Overall Process

    Liquid fuels, Biogas, etc.

  • Screening for Optimal Algae Strain  • 150 candidate strains  identified from literature

    • Screening for specific growth rate at pH 5.5 and 35 ᵒC

    • Four different growth media used 

    • Promising strain of  Scenedesmus identified – native to KY; currently our strain of choice

    Scenedesmus

    Scenedesmus acutus

  • • Lower capital cost than PBR • Easier to operate • Contamination by other strains/organisms problematic

    • Water loss by evaporation 

    • Better CO2 capture efficiency • Up to 3 times more photosynthetically active volume per unit area of land

    • Efficient water utilization through low evaporative losses

    • Biofilm formation problematic 

    Ponds vs. Photobioreactors (PBRs)

  • Evolution of CAER Photobioreactor Design (2008 ‐ present)  

  • UK CAER Photobioreactor

    Design Criteria: 

    • Inexpensive to build: cheap components, simple construction 

    • Inexpensive to operate: low liquid pumping and gas compression costs

    • Easy to operate: maintain optimal conditions for algae growth (pH,  adequate dissolved CO2 concentration, etc.) 

  • UK CAER Photobioreactor

    9

    Key Design Features of UK Photobioreactor:   PET packaging tubes: 3.5” diameter, 8’ in length; 

    significantly cheaper than PVC or glass  Flue gas introduced at return (3” pipe) – sufficient 

    suction generated to enable flue gas entrainment;  hence no compression costs

     Pressure driven; uses variable speed pump  PBR cost estimated at 

  • 0

    2

    4

    6

    8

    10

    12

    14

    16

    18

    20

    0

    250

    500

    750

    1000

    1250

    1500

    1750

    2000

    2250

    2500

    10 /9 /1 1  12 :0 0  AM

    10 /1 0/ 11

     1 2: 00

     A M

    10 /1 1/ 11

     1 2: 00

     A M

    10 /1 2/ 11

     1 2: 00

     A M

    10 /1 3/ 11

     1 2: 00

     A M

    10 /1 4/ 11

     1 2: 00

     A M

    10 /1 5/ 11

     1 2: 00

     A M

    10 /1 6/ 11

     1 2: 00

     A M

    10 /1 7/ 11

     1 2: 00

     A M

    10 /1 8/ 11

     1 2: 00

     A M

    D is so lv ed

     O xy ge n  (m

    g/ L)

    PA R  (m

    ic ro m ol *m

    ^‐ 2* s^ ‐1 )

    Actual Process Date and Time

    UK CAER Reactor Process Data (Week of 10/10/2011)

    Internal PAR

    Dissolved Oxygen (mg/L)

    • Dissolved oxygen reading is excellent indicator of algal growth/health  • Strong correlation between dissolved oxygen and PAR

  • Medium‐scale (650 L) Experimental Growth Studies

    y = 3.5182E‐03x2 ‐ 2.8371E+02x + 5.7194E+06 R² = 9.6292E‐01

    0

    0.2

    0.4

    0.6

    0.8

    1

    1.2

    1.4

    5/17/2010 5/22/2010 5/27/2010 6/1/2010 6/6/2010 6/11/2010

    D en

    si ty  (g (d ry m as s) /L )

    Varicon PBR ‐ Algal Growth Curve 

    Varicon Growth Campaign  (May 20th ‐ June 7th 2010)

    Harvest

    Inoculation

  • Carbon Balance (by Mass)

    • Total V of tank: 552 L • Density of algae: 1.5 g/L • g of C input (as CO2): 667 g

    • Our Scenedesmus is 42%  carbon via elemental analysis

    • 348 g C in our Scenedesmus

    • 52% CO2 used by our algae

    Input Output

    400X magnification

  • 1. Flocculation and  sedimentation

    • Leverages experience in  coal preparation and waste  products utilization

    • Low molecular weight  cationic flocculant (3 ppm)

    2. Decanting tank increases  density of biomass (2‐10%  solids) 

    3. Further dewatering via  filtration (up to 28% solids)

    Algae Harvesting

  • Algae Harvesting

    Flocculant-Assisted Sedimentation

    • 828 g of algae in system  (based on dry mass samples)

    • Recovered 751 g of dried  algae 90% of algae in system was recovered

    • 99% of H2O recovered • All water, nutrients and 

    unrecovered algae recycled back to system

    55 g/L

    1.56 g/L Pre‐flocculation

    Left over  after flock

    Flocked  biomass

  • East Bend Station Demonstration Facility 

    Capacity: 650 megawatts Location: Boone County, KY Commercial Date: 1981 • Define kinetics of process

    – Monitor dissolved CO2 and O2 to determine  photosynthetic rate

    – Help size large system and next generation  design

    • Gain understanding of real capital and operating  costs – Minimize energy consumption

    • Measure biomass composition to track heavy  metals and other flue gas constituents

  • East Bend Photobioreactor (18,000 L)

    16

    End view

    Side view

    M.H. Wilson, J. Groppo, A. Placido, S. Graham, S.A.  Morton III, E. Santillan‐Jimenez, A. Shea, M. Crocker,  C. Crofcheck, R. Andrews, Appl. Petrochem. Res.,  2014, 4: 41‐53. 

  • East Bend Growth Study: Winter 2012 Productivity & Photosynthetically Active Radiation (PAR)

    0

    1

    2

    3

    4

    5

    6

    0

    5

    10

    15

    20

    25

    30

    To ta l P AR

     u m ol /m

    2  xE 9

    Pr od

    uc tiv

    ity , g /m

    2/ da

    y

    East Bend Productivity

    Total PAR

    Average growth rate = 10 g/(m2.day) 

  • 18

    East Bend Growth Study: Summer 2013

    0

    10

    20

    30

    40

    50

    60

    70

    1‐Jun 11‐Jun 21‐Jun 1‐Jul 11‐Jul 21‐Jul

    Pr od

    uc tiv

    ity , g ra m s/ m 2/ da y Productivity

    Harvest

    Outage

    Average growth rate = 39.4 g/(m2.day) 

  • Techno‐economic Analysis  Effect of payback period (10 vs. 30 years), capital cost 

    reduction and algae growth rate 

    19

    0

    500

    1000

    1500

    2000

    2500

    3000

    0 20 40 60 80

    $/  to

    n  CO

    2

    Growth rate (g/(m2*day))

    Baseline

    30 yr base CAP

    30 Yr Low Cap

    (10 years)

    Baseline (30 years)

    Low capex (30 years)

  • Fuels Fertilizers

    Energy (Combustion)

    Animal Feed Supplements Animal Feed

    Aquaculture Feed

    Nutraceuticals Personal Hygiene

    Cosmetics Food Products

    FDA Regulated Applications

    Value Market Size

    Algal Biomass Utilization

  • Conclusions 

    • CO2 recycling using microalgae is feasible from a technical point of view: ‐ a low cost PBR has been designed, built and operated  ‐ a low cost methodology for algae harvesting and dewatering has been devised ‐ areal productivity of routinely ≥ 30 g/m2/day (summer) and ≥ 10 g/m2/day (winter) has been demonstrated at significant scale (18,000 L) ‐ lipid extraction and conversion to biodiesel and diesel range hydrocarbons has been demonstrated

    • At present, the economics remain uncertain. Current calculations suggest that the  cost of capturing and recycling CO2 using microalgae will fall close to $1600/ton CO2

    • The largest sources of cost reside in the algae culturing stage of the process,  corresponding mainly to the capital cost of the photobioreactor system

    • The overall economics will be driven by the value of the biomass ‐ hence, the  pro