Class I.  Critical thinking is skillful, responsible thinking. It is conducive to good judgment because it is sensitive to context, relies on criteria,

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Text of Class I.  Critical thinking is skillful, responsible thinking. It is conducive to good judgment...

  • Slide 1
  • Class I
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  • Critical thinking is skillful, responsible thinking. It is conducive to good judgment because it is sensitive to context, relies on criteria, and is self-correcting. Critical thinking is thinking about your thinking while youre thinking in order to make your thinking better.
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  • Reflective or metacognitive: thinking about your thinking. Involves standards: thinking measures up to criteria: Accuracy Relevance Depth Authentic: concerns real-life problems Reasonable follow rules thoughtfully. Critical thinking involves applying rules with sensitivity to context, goals, practical limitations.
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  • Asking questions (Noticing that there are questions that need to be addressed.) Trying to answer those questions by reasoning them out. Believing the results of our reasoning
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  • Asking questions (e.g., solving a problem) What are some alternative ways to solve the problem? What is a good way to begin? Do I have all the information I need to start solving the problem? What is the purpose behind the problem? Can the problem be solved? Does it even make sense? Whether a question is empty or not depends on the spirit in which you ask the question.
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  • Determine what information is/is not pertinent Distinguish between rational and emotional claims Separate fact from opinion Recognize ways that evidence might be limited or compromised Spot deception and holes in the arguments of others Present ones own analysis of data or information Recognize logical flaws in arguments Draw connections between discrete sources of data and information Attend to contradictory, inadequate, or ambiguous information Construct cogent arguments rooted in data rather than opinion Select the strongest set of supporting data Avoid overstated conclusions Identify holes in the evidence and suggest additional information to collect Recognize that a problem may have no clear answer or single solution Propose other options and weigh them in the decision Consider all stakeholders or affected parties in suggesting a course of action Articulate the argument and the context for that argument Correctly and precisely use evidence to defend the argument Logically and cohesively organize the argument Avoid extraneous elements in an arguments development Present evidence in an order that contribute to a persuasive argument
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  • How does what I learn in this course relate to my own experience? How can I use what I learn here in my own life? Can I think up my own examples? How does this subject matter relate to other courses I am taking? What is the evidence behind this? How do the topics in this course fit together? What is the purpose of the course? Why?
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  • Journal writing Reflect on your educational experience a little. Which of the questions listed by teachers are ones you tend to ask yourself in courses you are taking? Which of them do you never ask? Keep a journal of questions that arise during a course you are taking now: questions about the subject matter itself, about how it affects you (or not) about how you can use it, about implications of the course, about the way it is taught, about the assignments given, or about assignments not given.
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  • Approach answering a question in the spirit of genuinely wanting to figure out a clear, accurate answer to the question that is important to you Rethink the question and reformulate it in a more neutral and productive way Exercise: Write down 3 questions you have about critical thinking. Write down 3 questions you have about how you will be using critical thinking in this course. Of these 6 questions pick out the one you think is the best. If no real questions came to you, even after pushing, what conclusions do you draw from that?
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  • What are some concrete things that I can do to improve my job performance? to make better grades? to meet new people? to read more effectively? to make the subject matter of this course meaningful in my life? Exercise: Identify some situations in your life that are problematic, situations that are not going as well as you think they should. Write them as questions. Be specific in how you describe them. Dont just say, How can I get along with my friends? Focus the question: How can I best deal with Arthur when I feel him pressuring me to do X when I dont think I should be doing X? Write a list of further questions that you should be asking about those situations.
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  • How does what I learn in this course relate to my own experience? How can I use what I learn here in my own life? Can I think up my own examples? How does this subject matter relate to other courses I am taking? What is the evidence behind this? How do the topics in this course fit together? What is the purpose of this course? Why?
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  • Keep a journal of questions that arise during a course you are taking now. Questions may be about the subject matter itself how it affects you (or does not affect you) how you can use this knowledge implications of the course the way the course is taught the assignments given the assignments not given.
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  • Ask someone (and just accept the answers uncritically) Answer according to the way we have been raised (and accept that without examining whether it was a healthy way to be raised) Answer without looking for information even if its readily available Answer in accordance with your personality (without examining the extent to which your personality helps or hinders you in this kind of situation) Answer with what first comes into your head
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  • What are some important differences between a debate and a reasoned debate? Between writing a reaction paper and a reasoned reaction paper? Between evaluating an essay and giving a reasoned evaluation of an essay?
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  • Discussion Listening is as important as speaking Try to understand the reasons behind other peoples beliefs Try to identify both the strong and weak points of the views expressed Drawing conclusions on the basis of reasons and giving due weight to all relevant factors Relevant factors: implications of drawing those conclusions, the assumptions on which the reasoning is based, the accuracy of the reasons used, the alternatives available, etc.
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  • The teacher lowered my course grade because I missed too many classes. I feel unfairly treated. So I raise the question: Was my teacher being fair in giving me this grade? Collect information: Check the syllabus about missed classes Ask the teacher Consider the teacher's point of view on the issue and purpose in lowering grades due to absences Conclusion: the teacher was fair Therefore, I believe the results of my reasoning that my teachers actions in lowering my grade were fair. Why is this last step difficult?
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  • Other questions: Do I feel I was treated unfairly because of other circumstances in my life? What concept of fairness am I using in my thinking? Do I have some unstated assumptions that are influencing my feelings? Am I possibly wrong in my assumption that the teacher treated me unfairly?
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  • I reason something out but strong emotions arise within me against the result. I find myself believing contradictory things. I believe something very strongly, but I find I am unable to come up with any good reasons for the belief. In fact I dont even need reasons. Thinking the opposite seems ridiculous. I reason something out, but my actions do not follow my reasoning.
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  • Michael reasons out the issue of capital punishment as a deterrent. He gathers information and concludes that it does not significantly deter murder or other violent crimes. But after his investigation, he feels angry. He says, Maybe thats true, but Im still in favor of capital punishment because you have to do something to stop criminals.
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  • Maria, taking a course in gender studies, reasons her way through the argument that there is no nonsexist reason why a woman should adopt her husbands name at marriage. Like Michael, Maria discovers that the more she follows the argument the angrier she gets.
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  • Pete believes that all cultures and all cultural practices are equally valid. He believes people do not have a right to say that a particular cultures practices are wrong. But he also believes that its part of our Western culture to impose our ideas on others, and that its wrong for us to do that. (Most of us believe that everyone should be treated equally, but that does not prevent us from thinking we deserve special breaks.)
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  • Some people think that eating dogs, cats, or seagulls is revolting, but that eating cows or chickens is quite reasonable. They believe this despite the fact that all their reasoning shows the cases are identical. They find themselves trying to make up reasons that they know dont work (such as Dogs and cats are pets! Thats why it is wrong to eat them.)
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  • When youve thought through something critically and come to the conclusion that seems most reasonable to you, it follows that 1) you believe it 2) you start to act in accordance with that belief. Exercise: Can you find any examples where ind