Class 12 - Summer Vacation Assignment

  • Published on
    06-Mar-2015

  • View
    227

  • Download
    1

Embed Size (px)

Transcript

DPS MIS, DOHA QATAR Class XII Section A Reading[Note: The first passage is from an IELTS paper. The comprehension questions are of the IELTS format. They have been retained for better comprehension skills only. They do not indicate the kind of comprehension questions asked in the school exam]

Passage No. 11. One of London Zoos recent advertisements caused me some irritation, so patently did it distort reality. Headlined Without zoos you might as well tell these animals to get stuffed, it was bordered with illustrations of several endangered species and went on to extol the myth that without zoos like London Zoo these animals will almost certainly disappear forever. With the zoo worlds rather mediocre record on conservation, one might be forgiven for being slightly sceptical about such an advertisement. 2. Zoos were originally created as places of entertainment, and their suggested involvement with conservation didnt seriously arise until about 30 years ago, when the Zoological Society of London held the first formal international meeting on the subject. Eight years later, a series of world conferences took place, entitled The Breeding of Endangered Species, and from this point onwards conservation became the zoo communitys buzzword. This commitment has now been clearly defined in The World Zoo Conservation Strategy (WZCS, September 1993), which although an important and welcome document does seem to be based on an unrealistic optimism about the nature of the zoo industry. 3. The WZCS estimates that there are about 10,000 zoos in the world, of which around 1,000 represent a core of quality collections capable of participating in coordinated conservation programmes. This is probably the documents first failing, as I believe that 10,000 is a serious underestimate of the total number of places masquerading as zoological establishments. Of course it is difficult to get accurate data but, to put the issue into perspective; I have found that, in a year of working in Eastern Europe, I discover fresh zoos on almost a weekly basis.

Page 1 of 15

4. The second flaw in the reasoning of the WZCS document is the naive faith it places in its 1,000 core zoos. One would assume that the calibre of these institutions would have been carefully examined, but it appears that the criterion for inclusion on this select list might merely be that the zoo is a member of a zoo federation or association. This might be a good starting point, working on the premise that members must meet certain standards, but again the facts dont support the theory. The greatly respected American Association of Zoological Parks and Aquariums (AAZPA) has had extremely dubious members, and in the UK the Federation of Zoological Gardens of Great Britain and Ireland has occasionally had members that have been roundly censured in the national press. These include Robin Hill Adventure Park on the Isle of Wight, which many considered the most notorious collection of animals in the country. This establishment, which for years was protected by the Isles local council (which viewed it as a tourist amenity), was finally closed down following a damning report by a veterinary inspector appointed under the terms of the Zoo Licensing Act 1981. As it was always a collection of dubious repute, one is obliged to reflect upon the standards that the Zoo Federation sets when granting membership. The situation is even worse in developing countries where little money is available for redevelopment and it is hard to see a way of incorporating collections into the overall scheme of the WZCS. 5. Even assuming that the WZCSs 1,000 core zoos are all of a high standard complete with scientific staff and research facilities, trained and dedicated keepers, accommodation that permits normal or natural behaviour, and a policy of co-operating fully with one another, what might be the potential for conservation? Colin Tudge, author of Last Animals at the Zoo (Oxford University Press, 1992), argues that if the worlds zoos worked together in co-operative breeding programmes, then even without further expansion they could save around 2,000 species of endangered land vertebrates. This seems an extremely optimistic proposition from a man who must be aware of the failings and weaknesses of the zoo industry: the man who, when a member of the council of London Zoo, had to persuade the zoo to devote more of its activities to conservation. Moreover, where are the facts to support such optimism? 6. Today approximately 16 species might be said to have been saved by captive breeding programmes, although a number of these can hardly be looked upon as resounding successes. Beyond that, about a further 20 species are being seriously considered for zoo conservation programmes. Given that the international conference at London Zoo was held 30 years ago, this is pretty slow progress, and a long way off Tudges target of 2,000.

Page 2 of 15

Questions 1 7 Write

Do the following statements agree with the views of the writer in Reading Passage 2? YES if the statement agrees with the writer NO if the statement contradicts the writer NOT GIVEN if it is impossible to say what the writer thinks about this Answer Not Given

Example London Zoos advertisements are poorly presented. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7.

London Zoos advertisements are dishonest. Zoos made an insignificant contribution to conservation up until 30 years ago. The WZCS document is not known in Eastern Europe. Zoos in the WZCS select list were carefully inspected. No-one knew how the animals were being treated at Robin Hill Adventure Park. Colin Tudge was dissatisfied with the treatment of animals at London Zoo. The number of successful zoo conservation programmes is unsatisfactory.

Questions 8 10 Choose the appropriate letters A-D 8. What were the objectives of the WZCS document? A to improve the calibre of zoos world-wide B to identify zoos suitable for conservation practice C to provide funds for zoos in underdeveloped countries D to list the endangered species of the world 9. Why does the writer refer to Robin Hill Adventure Park? A to support the Isle of Wight local council B to criticize the 1981 Zoo Licensing Act C to illustrate a weakness in the WZCS document D to exemplify the standards in AAZPA zoos 10. What word best describes the writers response to Colin Tudges prediction on captive breeding programmes? A disbelieving B impartial C prejudiced D accepting

Page 3 of 15

11.

The writer mentions a number of factors which lead him to doubt the value of the WZCS document. Which THREE of the following factors are mentioned? Mark the three as a, b and c. List of Factors

i. ii. iii. iv. v. vi. 12.

the the the the the the

number of unregistered zoos in the world lack of money in developing countries actions of the Isle of Wight local council failure of the WZCS to examine the standards of the core zoos unrealistic aim of the WZCS in view of the number of species saved to date policies of WZCS zoo managers

Answer the following questions in one or two sentences a) Initially, what was the purpose of zoos? b) Expalin the advertisement headline mentioned in para 1. c) When and how did conservation become the zoo communitys buzzword?

13.

Find words from the passage which mean the same as the following. a) concealed para 3 masquerading b) doubtful para 4 dubious c) suggestion para 5 proposition d) average para 1 mediocre e) confined para 6 captive On the basis of your reading of the above passage make notes on it using headings and sub-headings. Use recognizable abbreviations wherever necessary. Write a summary of the above passage in 80 words using the notes; suggest a title for your notes.

14.

15.

Passage No. 2Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions that follow: (8 marks) 1. Nuclear weapons were first developed in the United States during the Second World War, to be used against Germany. However, by the time the first bombs were ready for use, the war with Germany had ended and, as a result, the decision was made to use the weapons against Japan instead. Hiroshima and Nagasaki have suffered the consequences of this decision to the present day. Page 4 of 15

2. The real reasons why bombs were dropped on two heavily populated cities are not altogether clear. A number of people in 1944 and early 1945 argued that the use of nuclear weapons would be unnecessary, since American Intelligence was aware that some of the most powerful and influential people in Japan had already realized that the war was lost, and wanted to negotiate a Japanese surrender. It was also argued that, since Japan has few natural resources, a blockade by the American navy would force it to surrender within a few weeks, and the use of nuclear weapons would thus prove unnecessary. If a demonstration of force was required to end the war, a bomb could be dropped over an unpopulated area like a desert, in front of Japanese observers, or over an area of low population inside Japan, such as a forest. Opting for this course of action might minimize the loss of further lives on all sides, while the power of nuclear weapons would still be adequately demonstrated. 3. All of these arguments were rejected, however, and the general consensus was that the quickest way to end the fighting would be to use nuclear weapons against centres of population inside Japan. In fact, two of the more likely reasons why this decision was reached seem quite shocking to us now. 4. Since the beginning of the Second World War both Germany and Japan had adopted a policy of genocide (i.e. killing as many people as possible, including civilians). Later on, even the US and Britian had used the strategy of firebombing cities (Dresden and Tokyo, for example) in order to kill, injure and intimidate as many civilians as possible. Certainly, the general public in the West has become used to hearing about the deaths of large numbers of people, so the deaths of another few thousand Japanese, who were the enemy in any case, would not seem particularly unacceptable a bit of justifiable revenge for the Allies own losses, perhaps. The second reason is not much easier to comprehend. Some of the leading scientists in the world had collaborated to develop nuclear weapons, and a lot of normal, intelligent people wanted to see nuclear weapons used; they wanted to see just how destructive this new invention could be. It no doubt turned out to be even more effective than they had imagined. (461 words) a) On the basis of your reading of the above passage, make notes on it in points only, using headings and sub-headings. Also use recognizable abbreviations, wherever necessary (minimum 4). Supply a suitable title to the passage. b) Write a summary of the above passage in about 80 words.

Passage No. 3Page 5 of 15

Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions that follow: 1. A 37 years old woman in South Korea, paralyzed 20 years ago, is now walking again. The miracle recovery was made possible after stem cells harvested from umbilical cord blood were introduced into her injured spine, initiating a process of nerve cell regeneration and healing. This is wonderful news especially for immobile spinal injury victims whove lost hope of ever regaining their motor abilities. Further, scientists say cord blood-generated multipotent stem cells can be safely used in treatment of other debilitating diseases like Parkinsons, Alzheimers and even diabetes. Unlike stem cells taken from donor adult bone marrow, cord blood cells have a lower risk of rejection on grounds of genotype mismatch, as they are more flexible. In fact, there is no ethical dilemma in using cord blood stem cells as the blood is drawn from the discarded umbilical cord and placenta, after childbirth. Scientists claim that extracting stem cells in this manner poses absolutely no danger either to the life or well being of the infant and the mother. 2. Cord blood stem cells, then could be the answer to resolving the pesky ethical questions worrying the patients and medical, legal and governing communities worldwide with regard to researching and / or availing of the cutting-edge stem cell technology. The other sources of stem cells blastocysts or pre-embryos and embryos (besides adult marrow) would entail destroying the embryo after extracting the stem cells. Hence the ongoing debate among the pro-choice and pro-life camps over the use of this technology. So far, over a hundred cord blood banks have already been established worldwide and stem cells from these banks have reportedly yielded encouraging results. Indias first cord blood bank a joint venture with a US firm is all set to open to the public in Chennai this month; anyone can get their babys cord blood cryo-frozen for 21 years for a payment of rupees 590000. This way, an individual who needs treatment can access his own cord blood for stem cells, and be assured of a compatible perfect match. With Indian biotech companies like Reliance Life Sciences already investing heavily in stem cell lines and cord blood banking, there is no doubt that this will be the next sunrise biotech area. In fact, with medical termination of pregnancies legal and fertility centres holding stocks of unutilized blastocysts / embryos that will ultimately be destroyed, India could become the worlds largest supplier of lifesaving therapeutic stem cells. (405 words) a) On the basis of your reading of the above passage, make notes on it in points only, using headings and sub-headings. Also use recognizable abbreviations, wherever necessary (minimum 4). Supply a suitable title to the passage. Page 6 of 15

b) Write a summary of the above passage in about 80 words.

Section B Writing1. a) b) c) Factual Description Answer any two Your younger brother has joined a boarding school. He wants to open a savings bank account. Write how to open an S.B. account in not more than 125 words. Write a brief description of the school at recess time. Do not exceed 125 words. Sheetals younger sister Seema is shifting to a university campus but noncatered accommodation. She wants to know the method of preparing tea. Sheetal decides to explain the process to her. Write the process description in not more than 125 words. Classified advertisement - Answer any three

2. a)

b)

c) d) e)

Rahul / Ragini has lost his / her school bag in a public bus. He / She drafts an advertisement to be published in the newspapers. Draft an advertisement giving the relevant details. [WL 50 words] You are the Vice-President [HR], Reliance Infocom, Noida. Write an advertisement to be published in the classified columns of a newspaper for suitable accommodation on rent to be used as a guesthouse for the company. [50 words] Harmeet Singh is interested in selling his old study materials for CAT preparation. Draft an advertisement for him. [50 words] Mr. Avnish Bahl wishes to engage a Maths tuto...

Recommended

View more >