Clarinet Brahms Quintet

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    Brahms's Clarinet Quintet, Op. 115Author(s): George DysonSource: The Musical Times, Vol. 76, No. 1106 (Apr., 1935), pp. 315-319Published by: Musical Times Publications Ltd.Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/918899.

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  • 7/21/2019 Clarinet Brahms Quintet

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    THE MUSICAL

    TIMES

    HE MUSICAL

    TIMES

    -cr

    r

    TX(Alto)

    soar,

    (X

    ______I

    fC

    tc.

    f

    Brass

    -

    -B

    \

    ^ D/_

    -cr

    r

    TX(Alto)

    soar,

    (X

    ______I

    fC

    tc.

    f

    Brass

    -

    -B

    \

    ^ D/_

    The

    work ends

    serenely,

    the chorus

    repeating

    the

    words '

    Happiness

    is

    here

    '

    against

    a

    floating

    orchestral

    background,

    over which a

    solo violin

    sings

    the

    soaring

    motto theme

    for

    the last

    time.

    The close is

    diatonic,

    there

    being

    not

    one

    accidental in the last sixteen bars.

    A

    study

    of

    the

    score

    conveys

    the

    feeling

    that

    'Nocturne'

    is a

    sincere and

    moving

    setting

    of

    a

    fine

    poem.

    The

    work

    is scored for a

    moderate

    orchestra

    of

    strings-two

    of

    each

    wood-wind,

    with

    cor

    anglais

    The

    work ends

    serenely,

    the chorus

    repeating

    the

    words '

    Happiness

    is

    here

    '

    against

    a

    floating

    orchestral

    background,

    over which a

    solo violin

    sings

    the

    soaring

    motto theme

    for

    the last

    time.

    The close is

    diatonic,

    there

    being

    not

    one

    accidental in the last sixteen bars.

    A

    study

    of

    the

    score

    conveys

    the

    feeling

    that

    'Nocturne'

    is a

    sincere and

    moving

    setting

    of

    a

    fine

    poem.

    The

    work

    is scored for a

    moderate

    orchestra

    of

    strings-two

    of

    each

    wood-wind,

    with

    cor

    anglais

    in

    addition,

    four.horns,

    three

    trombones,

    timpani,

    harp,

    celesta,

    and

    cymbals.

    (No

    trumpets

    or

    tuba,

    and the second

    oboe

    and

    trombones are

    cued

    in.)

    '

    Nocturne

    '

    should

    appeal

    to amateur

    organiza-

    tions

    that have a

    competent

    orchestra. The

    string writing is not difficult except in the matter

    of intonation and

    interpretation.

    The wind

    parts

    are

    inevitably

    more

    exacting,

    there

    being

    a

    number

    of

    important

    solo

    passages.

    The work is

    inscribed

    '

    To the

    memory

    of

    Frederick

    Delius.'

    in

    addition,

    four.horns,

    three

    trombones,

    timpani,

    harp,

    celesta,

    and

    cymbals.

    (No

    trumpets

    or

    tuba,

    and the second

    oboe

    and

    trombones are

    cued

    in.)

    '

    Nocturne

    '

    should

    appeal

    to amateur

    organiza-

    tions

    that have a

    competent

    orchestra. The

    string writing is not difficult except in the matter

    of intonation and

    interpretation.

    The wind

    parts

    are

    inevitably

    more

    exacting,

    there

    being

    a

    number

    of

    important

    solo

    passages.

    The work is

    inscribed

    '

    To the

    memory

    of

    Frederick

    Delius.'

    B r a h m s s C l a r i n e t

    Q u i n t e t ,

    O p .

    By

    GEORGE

    DYSON

    B r a h m s s C l a r i n e t

    Q u i n t e t ,

    O p .

    By

    GEORGE

    DYSON

    THERE

    are two main

    types

    of

    virtuoso. The

    most common is the

    performer

    who

    com-

    bines unusual

    facility

    with

    keen technical

    application

    and

    becomes

    an

    acrobat

    of

    the

    key-

    board,

    or

    of the

    fingerboard,

    or of

    the vocal

    cords.

    All

    these have their

    place

    in

    the broad

    field

    of

    artistic

    endeavour,

    and

    some of

    them

    have

    made notable contributions to

    progress

    in

    a

    particular sphere.

    The

    acrobatics of

    one

    generation

    often become the

    accepted

    technical

    standards

    of the next.

    Rarer,

    but

    far more

    important,

    are those

    artists who draw from their instruments a

    new

    aesthetic

    experience,

    who

    refine and

    enlarge

    the

    range

    of

    tone,

    who

    learn

    to

    devise and

    control

    new subtleties of phrasing, new varieties of

    expression,

    and who in fact

    create

    a

    new form

    of

    music

    by

    virtue of their

    mastery

    of the

    means of

    making

    it.

    Such men in our own

    time are

    Casals,

    Tertis,

    Leon

    Goossens.

    Each

    of

    these

    has raised his chosen

    instrument to a

    higher

    musical

    power,

    and

    each

    has

    stimulated both

    the

    study

    of the instrument itself and

    the

    production

    of music

    especially

    suited

    to

    it.

    The virtuoso

    has thus often

    preceded

    and

    influenced the

    com-

    poser.

    Brahms's Clarinet

    Quintet

    is an

    example

    of

    this

    influence,

    for

    we owe

    it,

    and

    the other

    works

    of

    Brahms

    which

    employ

    a

    solo

    clarinet,

    to

    the

    pre-eminence

    of

    Richard Miihlfeld as

    a

    performeron that instrument. Brahms was

    greatly

    impressed

    by

    Miihlfeld's

    playing

    and

    was moved

    *

    A lecture delivered at the

    Royal

    College

    of

    Organists

    on

    February

    16. Brahms's

    Clarinet

    Quintet

    is

    the work set for

    the

    1935

    Fellowship

    examination.

    THERE

    are two main

    types

    of

    virtuoso. The

    most common is the

    performer

    who

    com-

    bines unusual

    facility

    with

    keen technical

    application

    and

    becomes

    an

    acrobat

    of

    the

    key-

    board,

    or

    of the

    fingerboard,

    or of

    the vocal

    cords.

    All

    these have their

    place

    in

    the broad

    field

    of

    artistic

    endeavour,

    and

    some of

    them

    have

    made notable contributions to

    progress

    in

    a

    particular sphere.

    The

    acrobatics of

    one

    generation

    often become the

    accepted

    technical

    standards

    of the next.

    Rarer,

    but

    far more

    important,

    are those

    artists who draw from their instruments a

    new

    aesthetic

    experience,

    who

    refine and

    enlarge

    the

    range

    of

    tone,

    who

    learn

    to

    devise and

    control

    new subtleties of phrasing, new varieties of

    expression,

    and who in fact

    create

    a

    new form

    of

    music

    by

    virtue of their

    mastery

    of the

    means of

    making

    it.

    Such men in our own

    time are

    Casals,

    Tertis,

    Leon

    Goossens.

    Each

    of

    these

    has raised his chosen

    instrument to a

    higher

    musical

    power,

    and

    each

    has

    stimulated both

    the

    study

    of the instrument itself and

    the

    production

    of music

    especially

    suited

    to

    it.

    The virtuoso

    has