Christmas Lessons 2008 All Levels

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Christmas A4 druk

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Merry ChristmasChristmas crosswordLook at the Pictures. Write the words.Name: Class:

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Father Christmas

Christmas tree

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Christmas cake

cracker

card

star

stocking

present

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Christmas morning. Baby is asleep. Father Christmas is crying in the corner of a room and wakes Baby.

Christmas play

Father Christmas: Father Christmas. Baby: Father Christmas!

Baby: Hello! Whats your name?

Lucy (taking Father Christmas by the hand): Come and look at the Christmas tree. The children take Father Christmas to the sitting room. Annie: Look at the star!

Enter Stevie, Danny, Lucy, and Annie. Stevie, Danny, Lucy and Annie: Shh!

Stevie, Danny, Lucy and Annie: Father Christmas! Danny: Why are you sad? Stevie: I like Christmas! Baby: I like presents! Lucy: I like crackers!

Baby: Look!

Danny: Look at the decorations! Baby: Look at the presents!

Father Christmas: Oh.

Father Christmas (still crying): Yes. Father Christmas: Its Christmas.

Enter Mummy and Daddy. Mummy and Daddy: Children. Shh! All children: Look! Mummy and Daddy: Father Christmas! Stevie: Father Christmas is sad. He doesnt like Christmas Danny: He works at Christmas. Lucy: Or crackers.

Father Christmas: I like presents and crackers and Christmas dinner.

Annie: I like Christmas dinner!

Baby: He hasnt got any presents. Stevie: Or Christmas dinner!

Father Christmas: I work at Christmas. No presents, or crackers, or Christmas dinner for me. All children: Thats terrible! Father Christmas: No. Father Christmas: No. Stevie: Have you got a Christmas tree? Danny: Have you got Christmas decorations? Annie: Have you got a Christmas cake? Father Christmas: No. All children: Thats terrible!

Lucy: Why dont you like Christmas?

Mummy and Daddy: Thats terrible!

All children: Hooray!

Mummy: Yes! Christmas dinner and crackers!

Daddy: Have Christmas dinner here.

Baby (holding out a present): Happy Christmas, Father Christmas. Father Christmas: A present! For me? Oh thank you!

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Frosty the SnowmanFrosty the snowman was a jolly happy soul, With a corncob pipe and a button nose, And two eyes made out of coal. Frosty the snowman is a fairy tale, they say, He was made of snow but the children know how he came to life one day. There must have been some magic in that Old silk hat they found. For when they placed it on his head, He began to dance around. O, Frosty the snowman Was alive as he could be, And the children say he could laugh And play just the same as you and me. Thumpetty thump thump, Thumpety thump thump, Look at Frosty go. Thumpetty thump thump, Thumpety thump thump, Over the hills of snow.

Rudolph the Red-Nosed ReindeerRudolph, the red-nosed reindeer had a very shiny nose. And if you ever saw him, you would even say it glows. All of the other reindeer used to laugh and call him names. They never let poor Rudolph join in any reindeer games. Then one foggy Christmas Eve Santa came to say: "Rudolph with your nose so bright, won't you guide my sleigh tonight?" Then all the reindeer loved him as they shouted out with glee, Rudolph the red-nosed reindeer, you'll go down in history!

Christmas Oxford Bookworms Library A Christmas Carol

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The origins of Christmas

The principal religion in most English-speaking countries is Christianity. Christmas is one of the most important festivals in the Christian calendar. The celebration marks the birth of Jesus Christ and many of the traditions at Christmas relate to this event. Lots of schools give a nativity play at Christmas. This tells of the journey of Mary and Joseph to Betlehem, the birth of Jesus in a stable, and the visits he received from three kings (or wise men) and the shepherds. Christmas is seen as a time of giving and, as the kings and the shepherds gave gifts to Jesus, people give each other gifts and cards at Christmas. The symbol of the star, so often seen in decorations at Christmas, represents the star the kings followed to find their way to Jesus.

Christmas Day

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Christmas is celebrated on 25th December. On this day, families and friends exchange presents and share a Christmas dinner. Traditionally, the Christmas dinner is turkey with stuffing and vegetables followed by Christmas pudding (a steamed pudding with dried fruit). On the dinner table there are crackers beside every place setting. These are colorful packages that are pulled open between two people, to make a cracking noise. They contain a paper hat, a joke and a little present. A Christmas cake is eaten during the Christmas period. This is a fruit cake with icing and marzipan.

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Christmas trees

Christmas trees were a German tradition brought to Britain in 1841 when Prince Albert had a Christmas tree put up for his wife, Queen Victoria, in Windsor Castle. Now most people in Britain have a decorated Christmas tree in their houses at Christmas.

Father Christmas

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Children believe that Father Christmas, also known as Santa Claus, brings them presents. On Christmas Eve, 24th December, children hang stockings at the end of their beds or at the fireplace. Then while they are asleep, Father Christmas comes and puts presents in their stockings Traditionally, he comes down the chimney.

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Twas the Night before Christmas PoemTwas the night before Christmas, when all through the house Not a creature was stirring, not even a mouse. The stockings were hung by the chimney with care, In hopes that St Nicholas soon would be there. The children were nestled all snug in their beds, While visions of sugar-plums danced in their heads. And mamma in her kerchief, and I in my cap, Had just settled our brains for a long winters nap. When out on the lawn there arose such a clatter, I sprang from the bed to see what was the matter. Away to the window I flew like a flash, Tore open the shutters and threw up the sash. The moon on the breast of the new-fallen snow Gave the lustre of mid-day to objects below. When, what to my wondering eyes should appear, But a miniature sleigh, and eight tinny reindeer. With a little old driver, so lively and quick, I knew in a moment it must be St Nick. More rapid than eagles his coursers they came, And he whistled, and shouted, and called them by name! "Now Dasher! now, Dancer! now, Prancer and Vixen! On, Comet! On, Cupid! on, on Donner and Blitzen! To the top of the porch! to the top of the wall! Now dash away! Dash away! Dash away all!" As dry leaves that before the wild hurricane fly, When they meet with an obstacle, mount to the sky. So up to the house-top the coursers they flew, With the sleigh full of Toys, and St Nicholas too. And then, in a twinkling, I heard on the roof The prancing and pawing of each little hoof. As I drew in my head, and was turning around, Down the chimney St Nicholas came with a bound. He was dressed all in fur, from his head to his foot, And his clothes were all tarnished with ashes and soot. A bundle of Toys he had flung on his back, And he looked like a peddler, just opening his pack. His eyes how they twinkled! his dimples how merry! His cheeks were like roses, his nose like a cherry! His droll little mouth was drawn up like a bow, And the beard of his chin was as white as the snow. The stump of a pipe he held tight in his teeth, And the smoke it encircled his head like a wreath. He had a broad face and a little round belly, That shook when he laughed, like a bowlful of jelly! He was chubby and plump, a right jolly old elf, And I laughed when I saw him, in spite of myself! A wink of his eye and a twist of his head, Soon gave me to know I had nothing to dread. He spoke not a word, but went straight to his work, And filled all the stockings, then turned with a jerk. And laying his finger aside of his nose, And giving a nod, up the chimney he rose! He sprang to his sleigh, to his team gave a whistle, And away they all flew like the down of a thistle. But I heard him exclaim, ere he drove out of sight, "Happy Christmas to all, and to all a good-night!"

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Christmas teaching notesChristmas vocabulary cards (page 2)Point to the picture dictionary images. Say the words and ask the children to copy you. For more fun, vary the way you say the words. Gradually, stop saying the words and ask the children to say them without your help. Divide the class into two teams. Ask one child from each team to the front. Name something on the poster and ask the children to point to it. The first to do so wins a point for his/her team. Divide the class into two teams. Ask one child from each team to the front. Point to something on the poster and ask the children to name it. The first to do so wins a point for his/her team. Write the words in a different order in a column on the left. Ask the children what they think the words say and then ask them to match the words and the pictures with a line on the board. Vocabulary: Christmas, Father