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Chapter 6: Process Chapter 6: Process Synchronization Synchronization

Chapter 6: Process Synchronization. 6.2 Silberschatz, Galvin and Gagne ©2005 Operating System Concepts Module 6: Process Synchronization Background The

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Text of Chapter 6: Process Synchronization. 6.2 Silberschatz, Galvin and Gagne ©2005 Operating System...

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Chapter 6: Process Synchronization Slide 2 6.2 Silberschatz, Galvin and Gagne 2005 Operating System Concepts Module 6: Process Synchronization Background The Critical-Section Problem Petersons Solution Synchronization Hardware Semaphores Classic Problems of Synchronization Monitors Synchronization Examples Atomic Transactions Slide 3 6.3 Silberschatz, Galvin and Gagne 2005 Operating System Concepts Producer-Consumer Problem Paradigm for cooperating processes, producer process produces information that is consumed by a consumer process unbounded-buffer places no practical limit on the size of the buffer bounded-buffer assumes that there is a fixed buffer size Slide 4 6.4 Silberschatz, Galvin and Gagne 2005 Operating System Concepts Bounded-Buffer Shared-Memory Solution Shared data #define BUFFER_SIZE 10 Typedef struct {... } item; item buffer[BUFFER_SIZE]; int in = 0; int out = 0; Slide 5 6.5 Silberschatz, Galvin and Gagne 2005 Operating System Concepts Bounded-Buffer Insert() Method //Producer while (true) { /* Produce an item */ while (((in = (in + 1) % BUFFER SIZE count) == out) ; /* do nothing -- no free buffers */ buffer[in] = item; in = (in + 1) % BUFFER SIZE; } Slide 6 6.6 Silberschatz, Galvin and Gagne 2005 Operating System Concepts Bounded Buffer Remove() Method //Consumer while (true) { while (in == out) ; // do nothing -- nothing to consume // remove an item from the buffer item = buffer[out]; out = (out + 1) % BUFFER SIZE; return item; } Slide 7 6.7 Silberschatz, Galvin and Gagne 2005 Operating System Concepts Bounded Buffer Problem in previous example? Solution is correct, but can only use BUFFER_SIZE-1 elements, by assuming one producer and one consumer Slide 8 6.8 Silberschatz, Galvin and Gagne 2005 Operating System Concepts Background Concurrent access to shared data may result in data inconsistency Maintaining data consistency requires mechanisms to ensure the orderly execution of cooperating processes Suppose that we wanted to provide a solution to the consumer-producer problem that fills all the buffers. We can do so by having an integer count that keeps track of the number of full buffers. Initially, count is set to 0. It is incremented by the producer after it produces a new buffer and is decremented by the consumer after it consumes a buffer. Slide 9 6.9 Silberschatz, Galvin and Gagne 2005 Operating System Concepts Producer while (true) /* produce an item and put in nextProduced while (count == BUFFER_SIZE); // do nothing buffer [in] = nextProduced; in = (in + 1) % BUFFER_SIZE; count++; } Slide 10 6.10 Silberschatz, Galvin and Gagne 2005 Operating System Concepts Consumer while (1) { while (count == 0); // do nothing nextConsumed = buffer[out]; out = (out + 1) % BUFFER_SIZE; count--; /* consume the item in nextConsumed } Slide 11 6.11 Silberschatz, Galvin and Gagne 2005 Operating System Concepts Question? What problem do we have in the solution using count? Slide 12 6.12 Silberschatz, Galvin and Gagne 2005 Operating System Concepts Race Condition count++ could be implemented as register1 = count register1 = register1 + 1 count = register1 count-- could be implemented as register2 = count register2 = register2 - 1 count = register2 Consider this execution interleaving with count = 5 initially: S0: producer execute register1 = count {register1 = 5} S1: producer execute register1 = register1 + 1 {register1 = 6} S2: consumer execute register2 = count {register2 = 5} S3: consumer execute register2 = register2 - 1 {register2 = 4} S4: producer execute count = register1 {count = 6 } S5: consumer execute count = register2 {count = 4} Slide 13 6.13 Silberschatz, Galvin and Gagne 2005 Operating System Concepts Solution to Critical-Section Problem MUST satisfy the following three requirements: 1.Mutual Exclusion - If process P i is executing in its critical section, then no other processes can be executing in their critical sections 2.Progress - If no process is executing in its critical section and there exist some processes that wish to enter their critical section, then the selection of the processes that will enter the critical section next cannot be postponed indefinitely 3.Bounded Waiting - A bound must exist on the number of times that other processes are allowed to enter their critical sections after a process has made a request to enter its critical section and before that request is granted Assume that each process executes at a nonzero speed No assumption concerning relative speed of the N processes Slide 14 6.14 Silberschatz, Galvin and Gagne 2005 Operating System Concepts Solution to Critical-Section Problem do { CRITICAL SECTION REMAINDER SECTION } while (TRUE); Entry Section Exit Section Slide 15 6.15 Silberschatz, Galvin and Gagne 2005 Operating System Concepts Petersons Solution A classic software-based solution to the critical-section problem Two process solution Assume that the LOAD and STORE instructions are atomic; that is, cannot be interrupted. The two processes share two variables: int turn; Boolean flag[2] The variable turn indicates whose turn it is to enter the critical section. If turn == i, then process P i is allowed to execute in its critical section The flag array is used to indicate if a process is ready to enter the critical section. flag[i] = true implies that process P i is ready! Slide 16 6.16 Silberschatz, Galvin and Gagne 2005 Operating System Concepts Algorithm for Process P i do { flag[i] = TRUE; turn = j; while ( flag[j] && turn == j); CRITICAL SECTION flag[i] = FALSE; REMAINDER SECTION } while (TRUE); Slide 17 6.17 Silberschatz, Galvin and Gagne 2005 Operating System Concepts Petersons Solution Prove this solution satisfying the three requirements Exclusion Progress Bound waiting Slide 18 6.18 Silberschatz, Galvin and Gagne 2005 Operating System Concepts Synchronization Hardware Many systems provide hardware support for critical section code Uniprocessors could disable interrupts Currently running code would execute without preemption Generally too inefficient on multiprocessor systems Operating systems using this not broadly scalable Modern machines provide special atomic hardware instructions Atomic = non-interruptable Either test memory word and set value Or swap contents of two memory words Slide 19 6.19 Silberschatz, Galvin and Gagne 2005 Operating System Concepts TestAndSet Instruction Definition: boolean TestAndSet (boolean *target) { boolean rv = *target; *target = TRUE; return rv: } This function is to be executed atomically Slide 20 6.20 Silberschatz, Galvin and Gagne 2005 Operating System Concepts Solution using TestAndSet Shared boolean variable lock., initialized to false. Solution: do { while ( TestAndSet (&lock )) ; /* do nothing // critical section lock = FALSE; // remainder section } while ( TRUE); Slide 21 6.21 Silberschatz, Galvin and Gagne 2005 Operating System Concepts Swap Instruction Definition: void Swap (boolean *a, boolean *b) { boolean temp = *a; *a = *b; *b = temp: } This function is to be executed atomically Slide 22 6.22 Silberschatz, Galvin and Gagne 2005 Operating System Concepts Solution using Swap Shared Boolean variable lock initialized to FALSE; Each process has a local Boolean variable key. Solution: do { key = TRUE; while ( key == TRUE) Swap (&lock, &key ); // critical section lock = FALSE; // remainder section } while ( TRUE); Slide 23 6.23 Silberschatz, Galvin and Gagne 2005 Operating System Concepts Semaphore Synchronization tool that does not require busy waiting Semaphore S integer variable Two standard operations modify S: wait() and signal() Originally called P() and V() Less complicated Can only be accessed via two indivisible (atomic) operations wait (S) { while S = n) c.wait(); curr_sum += my_num; } void finish_access(int my num) { curr sum -= my num; c.broadcast(); } Slide 54 6.54 Silberschatz, Galvin and Gagne 2005 Operating System Concepts Synchronization Examples Solaris Windows XP Linux Pthreads Slide 55 6.55 Silberschatz, Galvin and Gagne 2005 Operating System Concepts Solaris Synchronization Implements a variety of locks to support multitasking, multithreading (including real-time threads), and multiprocessing Uses adaptive mutexes for efficiency when protecting data from short code segments Uses condition variables and readers-writers locks when longer sections of code need access to data Uses turnstiles to order the list of threads waiting to acquire either an adaptive mutex or reader-writer lock Slide 56 6.56 Silberschatz, Galvin and Gagne 2005 Operating System Concepts Windows XP Synchronization Uses interrupt masks to protect access to global resources on uniprocessor systems Uses spinlocks on multiprocessor systems Also provides dispatcher objects which may act as either mutexes and semaphores Dispatcher objects may also provide events An event acts much like a condition variable Slide 57 6.57 Silberschatz, Galvin and Gagne 2005 Operating System Concepts Linux Synchronization Linux: disables interrupts to implement short critical sections Linux provides: semaphores spin locks Slide 58 6.58 Silberschatz, Galvin and Gagne 2005 Operating System Concepts Pthreads Synchronization Pthreads API is OS-independent It provides: mutex locks condition variables Slide 59 End of Chapter 6