Career Paths

  • View
    101

  • Download
    3

Embed Size (px)

DESCRIPTION

Career Paths. Lesson Overview. The advantages of a technically oriented career path Job classifications associated with technically oriented career paths The earning potential of a technically oriented career path Four ways to pursue this career path. Lesson Objectives. - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

Text of Career Paths

  • Career Paths

  • Chapter 2, Lesson 2Lesson OverviewThe advantages of a technically oriented career pathJob classifications associated with technically oriented career pathsThe earning potential of a technically oriented career path Four ways to pursue this career path

    Chapter 2, Lesson 2

  • Chapter 2, Lesson 2Lesson ObjectivesKnow the advantages of a technically oriented career pathKnow the types of Job classifications associated with technically oriented career pathsKnow the earning potential of a technically oriented career path Know the different ways to pursue this career path

    Chapter 2, Lesson 2

  • Chapter 2, Lesson 2Quick WriteBased on what youve read in previous lessons, which factors do you think a person should consider in deciding whether to choose a technically oriented career or one that involves getting a college degree first?

    Chapter 2, Lesson 2

  • Chapter 2, Lesson 2 Advantages of a Technically Oriented Career Path

    Provides a way to earn a good livingGives you an opportunity to learn a tradeEnables you to develop your knowledge of science and technology

    Chapter 2, Lesson 2

  • Chapter 2, Lesson 2Job Classification ExamplesAuto Body RepairAuto Service TechnologyAviation and AerospaceBroadcast MediaBusinessCarpentry and ConstructionChild Care and EducationComputer InformationCosmetologyCriminal and LegalCulinary ArtsElectrical Occupations, ElectronicsEnergy and PowerEngine TechnologyEngineering

    Chapter 2, Lesson 2

  • Chapter 2, Lesson 2Job Classification ExamplesEnvironmentFood ServiceGraphic ArtsHealth Horticulture and LandscapeHospitality, Recreation, and TourismHeating, Ventilation/Air Conditioner RepairJournalismMachining, Manufacturing, and MasonryMilitary ServicePainting and RepairPerforming ArtsPhotography and FilmPlumbingPrintingProtection and Investigation

    Chapter 2, Lesson 2

  • Chapter 2, Lesson 2Job Classifications

    Examples of Jobs Within Five Career PathsAutomotive Service TechnologyAlternative Fuels Vehicle TechnicianDiesel MechanicDispatcherTruck DriverHealth Dental HygienistHome Care AideMassage TherapistMedical Laboratory TechnicianCulinary Arts BakerButcherWaiter or WaitressWedding Cake DesignerHospitality, Recreation, and Tourism Aerobics InstructorBus DriverHotel DetectivePublic Relations SpecialistTelecommunicationsFrame WirerLine Installer or RepairerRadio MechanicTelecommunications Equipment Technician

    Chapter 2, Lesson 2

  • Chapter 2, Lesson 2Job ClassificationsTo find out more information:Occupational Outlook Handbook at www.bls.gov/oco

    Vocational Information Center at www.khake.com

    Americas Career Network at www.acrenetwork.org/students.aspx

    Voyages at www.careervoyages.gov/

    Chapter 2, Lesson 2

  • Chapter 2, Lesson 2 Earning Potential for Six Career Paths

    Earnings Potential for Six Career PathsPositionButcherBus DriverDisc JockeyFlight AttendantPipe FitterSmall Engine Mechanic Earning$15,800$42,400/year $8.66$23.53/hour $6.14$24.92/hour$23,450$95,850/year$23,800$69,200/year$15,300$38,200/year

    Chapter 2, Lesson 2

  • Chapter 2, Lesson 2An ExampleA typical work week is 40 hours, and a year has 52 weeks

    If you multiply the hourly earnings of the highest-paid bus driver ($23.53) by 40 (hours) and then by 52 (weeks), youll get $48,942. Thats the drivers annual earnings

    Chapter 2, Lesson 2

  • Chapter 2, Lesson 2Four Ways to Pursue This PathA technical training program

    An internship

    An apprenticeship

    A pre-apprenticeship program

    Chapter 2, Lesson 2

  • Chapter 2, Lesson 2Technical Training ProgramA technical training program is a learning experience that will give you the knowledge and skills you need to start a technically oriented career.

    Chapter 2, Lesson 2

  • Chapter 2, Lesson 2Technical Training ProgramMostly cover: AgricultureBusinessFamily and consumer sciencesHealth occupationsRetail salesTrade and industryTechnology

    Photo courtesy of Clipart.com

    Chapter 2, Lesson 2

  • Chapter 2, Lesson 2Technical Training ProgramCooperative education (co-op) programs Vocational schools Private organizations Photo courtesy of Clipart.com

    Chapter 2, Lesson 2

  • Chapter 2, Lesson 2InternshipA low-paying or volunteer job in a field that interests youGives you work experienceBoosts your self-esteemMakes you more responsibleGives you referencesHelps you meet a mentor

    Chapter 2, Lesson 2

  • Chapter 2, Lesson 2ApprenticeshipAn opportunity to learn a trade on the job while also learning in class

    Programs vary in length from 1 to 6 years

    Lets you work and learn as an employee

    Available in more than 850 occupations

    Chapter 2, Lesson 2

  • Chapter 2, Lesson 2Apprenticeship OpportunitiesThe 25 Most Popular Apprenticeships, 2005, at http://www.dolets.gov/atels_bat/top-25-occupations-2005.cfm

    RankOccupationTotal Active EnrolledNumber of Active ProgramsAverage Enrollment/Program1Electrician38,7063,28011.82Carpenter22,43448146.63Plumber15,7872,3536.74Pipe Fitter (construction)8,46079410.75Sheet Metal Worker7,62958213.16Structural-Steel Worker4,72413136.17Elevator Constructor4,4755581.48Roofer4,39714031.4

    Chapter 2, Lesson 2

  • Chapter 2, Lesson 2Apprenticeship OpportunitiesThe 25 Most Popular Apprenticeships, 2005, at http://www.dolets.gov/atels_bat/top-25-occupations-2005.cfm

    RankOccupationActiveEnrolledActiveProgramsAverageEnrollment9Sprinkler Fitter4,2718550.210 Bricklayer (construction)4,14821719.111Construction Craft Laborer4,1367158.312Painter (construction)3,93724516.113Operating Engineer3,37012626.714Child Care Development Specialist2,9531,0172.915Boilermaker 2,5563182.516Heating/Air-Conditioner- Installer2,4426223.9

    Chapter 2, Lesson 2

  • Chapter 2, Lesson 2Apprenticeship OpportunitiesThe 25 Most Popular Apprenticeships, 2005, at http://www.dolets.gov/atels_bat/top-25-occupations-2005.cfm

    RankOccupationActiveEnrolledActiveProgramsAverageEnrollment17Powerline Maintainer2,4182689.018Powerline Installer and Repairer2,2897829.319Correction Officer2,2695541.320Millwright2,2614385.221Cook (Hotel and Restaurant)1,8374044.522Electrician maintenance1,8289152.023Machinist1,7391,3461.324Tool and Die Maker1,7331,4861.225Insulation Worker1,73210416.7

    Chapter 2, Lesson 2

  • Chapter 2, Lesson 2Apprenticeship OccupationsWith Highest EarningsCommonly Apprenticed Occupations with the Highest Earnings, at http://www.pueblo.gsa.gov/cic_text/employ/apprentice/apprentice.htm

    Occupation Median Annual Earnings, 2000Power distributor and dispatcher $48,570Electrical and electronics repairer, powerhouse, substation, and relay 48,540Ship engineer 47,530Elevator installer and repairer 47,380Power plant operator 46,090Electrical powerline installer and repairer 45,780 Petroleum pump system operator, refinery operator, and gauger 45,180Gas plant operator 44,730

    Chapter 2, Lesson 2

  • Chapter 2, Lesson 2Apprenticeship OccupationsWith Highest EarningsCommonly Apprenticed Occupations with the Highest Earnings, at http://www.pueblo.gsa.gov/cic_text/employ/apprentice/apprentice.htm

    Occupation Median Annual Earnings, 2000Telecommunications equipment installer and repairer, except line installer 44,030Avionics technician 41,300Tool and die maker 41,110Aircraft structure, surfaces, rigging, and systems assembler 40,850Chemical plant and system operator 40,750Aircraft mechanic and service technician 40,550Stationary engineer and boiler operator 40,420

    Chapter 2, Lesson 2

  • Chapter 2, Lesson 2 How to Locate an ApprenticeshipVisit career-counseling offices

    Look in newspapers and on job boards

    Contact the Bureau of Apprenticeship or the US Department of Labor

    Consult the US Department of Labors apprenticeship website: http://www.doleta.gov/atels_bat/

    Photo courtesy of Goodshoot Images

    Chapter 2, Lesson 2

  • Chapter 2, Lesson 2 Applying for an ApprenticeshipOnce you find a good apprenticeship program, you have to apply for entrance

    Most programs require:minimum 18 years oldhigh school diplomaan interview

    Photo courtesy of Clipart.com

    Chapter 2, Lesson 2

  • Chapter 2, Lesson 2The InterviewWhy do you think you would be good at this job?Have you ever worked as part of a team?Do you know what the work is like?What do you think youll be doing in 5 or 10 years?How dependable and resourceful are you? For example, how would you get to work if your car broke down?

    Chapter 2, Lesson 2

  • Chapter 2, Lesson 2Take a TourLook for the following:Is the equipment modern?Is the work site comfortable and safe?Do the workers seem willing to teach skills?What would the work schedule look like?How would you get to the work site?A tour is an excellent opportunity to ask employees questions about their jobs

    Chapter 2, Lesson 2

  • Chapter 2, Lesson 2Pre-apprenticeship ProgramsSchool-to-apprenticeship program:Allows high school students to begin their apprenticeships as juniors and seniorsWork part-timeEarn school creditAfter graduation, become a full-time apprenticeTo learn more, ask your guidance counselor or call your school district office

    Chapter 2, Lesson 2

  • Chapter 2, Lesson 2ReviewAdvantages to pursuing a technically oriented career path:Earn a good livingLearn a tradeDevelop your knowledgePhoto courtesy of Photos.com

    Chapter 2, Lesson 2

  • Chapter 2, Lesson 2ReviewIncludes jobs in agriculture, business, manufacturing, and telecommunications

    The earning potential varies from job to job

    There are several training programs you can take advantage of now, even in high school!

    Chap