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1 Career Exploration Workshop Day One 05/16/22 Maine Vocational Rehabilitation 1

Career Exploration Workshop

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Career Exploration Workshop. Day One. 1. Facilitators. 2. Day One Agenda. Day One Introductions Expectations for the workshop The Bureau of Rehabilitation Services Career Center Services Collaboration with VRC The Career Decision-Making Grid. 3. Day One Agenda - continued. - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

Text of Career Exploration Workshop

  • *Career Exploration Workshop

    Day One

    *Maine Vocational Rehabilitation*

    Maine Division of Vocational Rehabilitation

  • *Facilitators

    **Maine Vocational Rehabilitation

    Maine Division of Vocational Rehabilitation

  • *Day One AgendaDay OneIntroductionsExpectations for the workshopThe Bureau of Rehabilitation ServicesCareer Center Services Collaboration with VRCThe Career Decision-Making Grid

    **Maine Vocational Rehabilitation

    Maine Division of Vocational Rehabilitation

  • *Day One Agenda - continuedOpening ExerciseEmployment Readiness Scale (ERS)Life/Work Balance Part 1O*NET Interest InventoryMemory Net - AchievementsDay One Thoughts*Maine Vocational Rehabilitation*

    Maine Division of Vocational Rehabilitation

  • *Housekeeping IssuesBathroomsWorkshop runs from 9:00 AM to Noon and 1:00 to 4:00 PMBreaks 10:30 AM & 2:30 PMComfort feel free to get up and stretch, walk, if neededBack Issues - Need more comfortable chair??Lunch on your own (1 hour)

    **Maine Vocational Rehabilitation

    Maine Division of Vocational Rehabilitation

  • *Welcome and IntroductionsYour Name - Your most recent Job Title - Name one Skill that you have demonstrated in the past from work, learning, leisure or personal life - What is your current Goal?Its OK to be undecided.

    **Maine Vocational Rehabilitation

    Maine Division of Vocational Rehabilitation

  • *CEW Group ObjectivesTo assist clients in exploring possible future employment options.Participants will have the opportunity to learn from each others experiences .Participants will work in a team environment in both small and large group activities in the process of developing a possible employment goal.

    Maine Division of Vocational Rehabilitation

  • *Our ExpectationsYou will use this workshop as an opportunity for Career Exploration and Planning.You will develop a tentative Initial Plan for Employment .Attend all five sessions.Be on time for sessions and after breaks.Participate.Take turns speaking.Use I statements when expressing opinion.Respect others in the group and their views.Turn off cell phones.Have fun!**Maine Vocational Rehabilitation

    Maine Division of Vocational Rehabilitation

  • *Group ConfidentialityAs a member of this group, we ask that you respect other peoples privacy and keep what is said in the workshop confidential.You certainly can share your experience in the workshop but we ask that you not talk about what is said by others outside the room.We cannot guarantee that everything that is shared will stay in the room, so only share what you are comfortable discussing.

    Maine Division of Vocational Rehabilitation

  • *What Are Your Expectations?

    What do you hope to learn?What would you like to get from the workshop?

    **Maine Vocational Rehabilitation

    Maine Division of Vocational Rehabilitation

  • *Collaboration with your VRC

    VRC - Do you know who your Vocational Rehabilitation Counselor is?Purpose of Career Exploration WorkshopTo help you and VRC develop an employment plan and to help you become employed in job that suits who you are as a worker

    **Maine Vocational Rehabilitation

    Maine Division of Vocational Rehabilitation

  • *Collaboration with your VRCProcess of CEW/PDSession 1 - 3-day series of self-assessments and group exercises to help you begin career explorationPlanning Meeting between Sessions 1 & 2 meeting with VRC to review workshop results Session 2 2-day series of activities to complete a tentative employment action planFollow-up Meeting(s) with VRC - determine next steps in developing, completing & implementing plan

    **Maine Vocational Rehabilitation

    Maine Division of Vocational Rehabilitation

  • *Your QuestionsWhat Are Your Questions or Comments?Feel free to record your questions or comments on the flip chart during breaks or during lunch.We will discuss your comments and questions as they arise.*Maine Vocational Rehabilitation*

    Maine Division of Vocational Rehabilitation

  • *The Bureau of Rehabilitation Services- The Bureau of Rehabilitation Services includes: General Vocational Rehabilitation Services (DVR)Division for the Deaf, Hard of Hearing and Late-Deafened (DODHOHLD)Division for the Blind and Visually Impaired (DBVI)

    **Maine Vocational Rehabilitation

    Maine Division of Vocational Rehabilitation

  • *Morning Break15 minutesBathrooms?Refreshments?Smoke? outside of Career Center in designated areas only Return by _______?**Maine Vocational Rehabilitation

    Maine Division of Vocational Rehabilitation

  • *Maine CareerCenters Offer: Library with Labor Market InformationComputer Center with Internet AccessSpecial Services Veterans, Seniors, Laid-off workers, Youth Services and moreEmployment Assistance Workshops Resume writing and interviewingJob Fairs onsite or onlineTraining ProgramsJob Bank see handout Or go to mainecareercenter.com**Maine Vocational Rehabilitation

    Maine Division of Vocational Rehabilitation

  • *Career Decision-Making GridDocumenting what you learn after each activity Pages 2,3,4 Activity BookIncludes information from the assessments, activities and discussions This tool connects what you learn about YOU and possible occupational goals.Does this job fit my characteristics?Completing the grid helps you to determine your goal.*Maine Vocational Rehabilitation*

    Maine Division of Vocational Rehabilitation

  • *Noon Lunch Break

    1 hourCan eat lunch here or go out Lunch alternatives in the areaReturn by______?**Maine Vocational Rehabilitation

    Maine Division of Vocational Rehabilitation

  • *Where Do I Fit in the World of Work?*Maine Vocational Rehabilitation*WORLD OF WORK

    Maine Division of Vocational Rehabilitation

  • *Opening ExerciseBarsch Learning Style InventoryReview the instructionsComplete the exercise to the best of your ability

    Be sure to record what you learned into the Career Decision-Making Grid. **Maine Vocational Rehabilitation

    Maine Division of Vocational Rehabilitation

  • *How Do I Learn BestWe gather and process information in a variety of ways called - learning styles.We usually have a preferred learning style:AUDITORY by hearingVISUAL by seeingTACTILE by feelingKINESTHETIC by moving

    *Maine Vocational Rehabilitation*

    Maine Division of Vocational Rehabilitation

  • *Barsch Learning Style InventoryTake the Barsch Learning Style Inventory

    Once you have finished, follow the directions for scoring on the back of the inventory.

    Take a look at the suggestions for your preferred learning styles in the blue Effective Study Tips pamphlet.

    *Maine Vocational Rehabilitation*

    Maine Division of Vocational Rehabilitation

  • *Visual Learning StyleIf you have a high visual score You need to: see study materialspractice visualizing what you are learninguse charts, maps, videos, written notes, pictures, flashcards use brightly colored markerswrite things out *Maine Vocational Rehabilitation*

    Maine Division of Vocational Rehabilitation

  • *Auditory Learning StyleIf you have a high auditory score You need to: use tapes for the lectures and review themsit where you can hear clearly without distractionread important points out loud to yourselfgather in study groups and learn together

    *Maine Vocational Rehabilitation*

    Maine Division of Vocational Rehabilitation

  • *Tactile Learning StyleIf you have a high tactile scoreYou need to: write as you learnreview by writing things downcombine strategies with another learning stylehave paper handy to write things down

    *Maine Vocational Rehabilitation*

    Maine Division of Vocational Rehabilitation

  • *Kinesthetic Learning StyleIf you have a high kinesthetic score You need to: Involve your body as part of your learningWalk while you review your notesStand up on occasion to shift your body Use physical objects to help you learn flashcards, hold onto a pen or pencil Use role-playingUse hand gestures or body language

    *Maine Vocational Rehabilitation*

    Maine Division of Vocational Rehabilitation

  • *Barsch Learning Style InventoryWhat are your two preferred learning styles?Do those learning styles seem to make sense for you?

    Record your learning style on your Career Decision-Making Grid, page 1, item 1, in the section titled Preferred Barsch Learning Style*Maine Vocational Rehabilitation*

    Maine Division of Vocational Rehabilitation

  • *

    Maine Division of Vocational Rehabilitation

  • *Employment Readiness ScalePurpose P.7 Activity WorkbookTo give you a measure of your readiness for employment at this point in your lifeLooks at 3 areas: Challenges to employment Coping skillsEmployabilityHelps you understand what will increase your chances of being effective in your work lifeBased on how you see yourself at this point

    *Maine Vocational Rehabilitation*

    Maine Division of Vocational Rehabilitation

  • *Employment Readiness Scale3 Types of Challenges to Job Success Personal Challenges (found at the end of the feedback report)the ones under your controlNeed for more education?Health issues?Personal relationships?Need for additional income*Maine Vocational Rehabilitation*

    Maine Division of Vocational Rehabilitation

  • *Employment Readiness Scale Environmental challenges -

    Are outside responsibilities that could interfere with your success at work Children Parent Pets

    *Maine Vocational Rehabilitation*

    Maine Division of Vocational Rehabilitation

  • *Employment Readiness ScaleSystemic ChallengesSystem or Community ChallengesTransportationHousingWork CredentialsFinancial aid, if necessary *Maine Vocational Rehabilitation*

    Maine Division of Vocational Rehabilitation

  • *Employment Readiness ScaleLook at Type of Challenges at bottom of page 3 or at the top of page 4.

    Your responses indicated either: Low = not an area for you to focus on Medium = could be an area that needs your focusHigh = an area you need to focus on*Maine Vocational Rehabilitation*

    Maine Division of Vocational Rehabilitation

  • *Employment Readiness ScaleSupports to Deal and Cope with Challenges Self-EfficacyYour belief in your ability to perform wellOutcome ExpectancyWhether or not you feel you can succeed at what you trySocial SupportsWhether or not you know where to turn for helpWork HistoryYour past experience with work*Maine Vocational Rehabilitation*

    Maine Division of Vocational Rehabilitation

  • *Employment Readiness ScaleBar Graph it is a picture of the information you find in your feedback report.The Line that goes up and down shows adequate level of support for coping in this areaLeft of that Line shows the need to do some work in this areaRight of that Line shows that you have the supports for coping in this area - a strength.*Maine Vocational Rehabilitation*

    Maine Division of Vocational Rehabilitation

  • *Employment Readiness ScaleSelf-Sufficiency in 5 Employment AreasCareer Decision-MakingHow do you decide what you want to do in your work life?Skills EnhancementHow do you decide if you have the skills you need to do the work?Job SearchHow do you decide where to look to find a job?Job MaintenanceHow do you decide how to keep a job, once you get it?Ongoing Career ManagementHow do you decide to manage your work life through promotion or job change?*Maine Vocational Rehabilitation*

    Maine Division of Vocational Rehabilitation

  • *Employment Readiness ScaleNow it is time to enter information into your Career Decision-Making Grid, on page 1 Item 2 Employability DimensionsItem 3 Coping SkillsItem 4 Challenges

    * This will help you to remember to discuss this information with your VR Counselor.

    *Maine Vocational Rehabilitation*

    Maine Division of Vocational Rehabilitation

  • *Life and Work Balance Part 1 We have been talking about being employment ready, so how will you manage your time once you have started to work, knowing the demands on your time will change. P. 8-9 Activity

    *Maine Vocational Rehabilitation*

    Maine Division of Vocational Rehabilitation

  • *Life and Work Balance DiscussionWhat does your current pie look like - what is the allocation for each piece? Why is your time allocated this way?Are you satisfied with this allocation, or would you like to make some changes?

    Go to the Career Decision-Making Grid on Page 1, item 5, and record anything you want to change.*Maine Vocational Rehabilitation*

    Maine Division of Vocational Rehabilitation

  • *Afternoon Break15 minutesBe back at ___________?**Maine Vocational Rehabilitation

    Maine Division of Vocational Rehabilitation

  • *Self-Assessment: Interest Inventory

    What do I like to do?What is the connection between my interests and my future job(s)?What is the connection between my interests and my personal characteristics?

    **Maine Vocational Rehabilitation

    Maine Division of Vocational Rehabilitation

  • *Interest InventoryInterest Profiler Computer-Based180 activitiesChoose: Like Undecided Dislike Try Not To Think About:Whether you have enough education or training or experience to perform the activity, orHow much money you would make performing the activityJust Think About Whether you like this activity?

    *Maine Vocational Rehabilitation*

    Maine Division of Vocational Rehabilitation

  • *Holland-Based Interest InventoryGo to the computers and take either the O*NET or other Interest InventoryBe sure to respond whenever you are prompted to print a particular screen or report.Once you have closed out of the system, we cannot retrieve your report.*Maine Vocational Rehabilitation*

    Maine Division of Vocational Rehabilitation

  • *Interest InventoryInterest Profiler Page 10Based on the work of Dr. John Hollands model of six personality types and the work environments that are compatible with those personality types

    *Maine Vocational Rehabilitation*

    Maine Division of Vocational Rehabilitation

  • *Six Holland Types*Maine Vocational Rehabilitation*RealisticInvestigativeArtisticSocialEnterprisingConventional

    Maine Division of Vocational Rehabilitation

  • *Six Holland TypesCommon Names*Maine Vocational Rehabilitation*DoersThinkersCreatorsHelpersPersuadersOrganizers

    Maine Division of Vocational Rehabilitation

  • *What Do the Different Holland Types Use to Do Their Jobs?*Maine Vocational Rehabilitation*ThingsIdeasPeopleDataREALISTICINVESTIGATIVECONVENTIONALARTISTICSOCIALENTERPRISING

    Maine Division of Vocational Rehabilitation

  • *What is your Type?

    What are your two highest interest preferences? P. 11 Activity

    Do your interest preferences match what you know about yourself?

    *Maine Vocational Rehabilitation*

    Maine Division of Vocational Rehabilitation

  • *Job ZonesA Job Zone isA group of occupations that are similar inHow most people get into the jobHow much experience is needed to get the jobHow much education is needed to do the jobHow much on-the-job training is needed

    So occupations in a Job Zone require similar amounts of preparation to do the job.*Maine Vocational Rehabilitation*

    Maine Division of Vocational Rehabilitation

  • *Job ZonesWhat do they tell us?

    Job Zone 1 -Little/No preparationJob Zone 2 - Some preparationJob Zone 3 - Medium preparationJob Zone 4 -Considerable preparationJob Zone 5 - Extensive preparation*Maine Vocational Rehabilitation*

    Maine Division of Vocational Rehabilitation

  • *Record Interests On the Career Decision-Making Grid on page 1, item 6, record your two highest scores.

    On page 3, item7, record occupations of interest. *Maine Vocational Rehabilitation*

    Maine Division of Vocational Rehabilitation

  • *Definition of an Achievement A Different Source of Skill Information P. 12 ActivityA Chance to Recall Skills from Work, Leisure, Learning and Personal LifeA Chance to Take Credit for Past AccomplishmentsA Chance to Share Your AccomplishmentsA Process of Documenting Skills for Future Resumes

    *Maine Vocational Rehabilitation*

    Maine Division of Vocational Rehabilitation

  • *Achievements and Accomplishments (as defined by Richard Bolles and Bernard Haldane)Activities in which YOU were the main characterActivities which you felt good about or that gave you some satisfactionActivities that you enjoyed doingActivities that possibly challenged youActivities that were concrete and time-limitedActivities that had a beginning and an end*Maine Vocational Rehabilitation*

    Maine Division of Vocational Rehabilitation

  • *Homework Activity Handout P. 13 Activity Acknowledging Your Accomplishments

    Homework AssignmentGenerate as many achievements as you can on the following handout and a phrase to remind you of this achievement.*Maine Vocational Rehabilitation*

    Maine Division of Vocational Rehabilitation

  • *Demonstration of an Achievement Story?

    What are you hearing from this story?*Maine Vocational Rehabilitation*

    Maine Division of Vocational Rehabilitation

  • *Day One ThoughtsAny Reactions to todays exercises?

    Did the exercises trigger any ideas?

    Questions/Concerns for the group or VRC?

    Your evaluation of todays activities**Maine Vocational Rehabilitation

    Maine Division of Vocational Rehabilitation

    *Facilitator Directions:OBJECTIVE: To welcome and acclimate workshop participants to the CEWMaterials/Equipment: Laptop computer & LCD Projector, current PowerPoint presentation for Day One on flash drive, & Facilitator Notebook, Post-It Notes wall charts for each participant Magic markers, attendance sheet, refreshments, Participant loose-leaf folders, table tents for participants

    Each facilitator fills out a Table Tent prior to the beginning of the workshop.

    Be sure the laptop is on, correctly connected to the LCD projector or other TV screen is working properly. Set up the room and create a pleasant environment as participants enter the room. Have the PowerPoint ready for presentation.

    Distribute the manuals and tent cards on the table so they will be ready for the participants.

    As participants come in, direct them to complete a Table Tent with their name, using a magic marker. They can fill in their first name only in large letters .

    Facilitators take attendance as people come in.

    Participants are invited to partake in whatever refreshments are provided.coffee & donuts, water, healthy snacks.

    When facilitators are ready to begin, announce the name of the workshop to ensure that participants are in the right place.

    Facilitators should indicate to participants that the PowerPoint presentation and handouts are all located in their Participant notebooks in the order of presentation.

    **Facilitator Notes: Facilitators introduce themselves with more details later.

    Participants may want to write in the names of the facilitators.

    **Facilitator Notes:OBJECTIVE: Review the days agenda, with a brief overview of each segment.

    For all of us to get to know one another, lets do introductions Then we will discuss VRs Expectations and Your Expectations for the workshop.Discuss an overview of the Bureau of Rehabilitation ServicesTalk about the great services offered at the Career Centers; to have handouts available for participants.Collaboration with VRC facilitator needs to create a clear boundary that they [the facilitator] will not be working directly with the participants to develop the employment plan. The participants are directed to discuss what they are learning about themselves and their goals with their VRC, using the results of this workshop. To implement what you are learning and to set goals, you will meet with your assigned VRC to move forward with decision-making and then a plan of action. How to Use the Career Decision-Making Grid to help with goal identification and a plan of action. The purpose of the Grid is to gather all of the information you learn about yourself, about different kinds of occupations and how the two come together.

    **Facilitator Directions: First day agenda continued

    The Opening Exercise - on Values, if you are using the Coat of Arms.

    Employment Readiness Scale we will talk about the different components of the assessment.

    Life/Work Balance asks the question about how you are using your time to maintain a balance in your life.

    O*NET Interest Inventory will be looking at what you like to do and how that relates to the work you choose to do.

    Memory Net generates ideas about your past achievements.

    Day One Thoughts check-in of their day (very short).**Facilitator Directions:

    Go over housekeeping issues, adding any changes/differences, based on the workshop location.

    Remind them of the workshop hours - 9:00 AM to Noon and 1:00 4:00 PM.

    Indicate that, if they need to stand and/or walk around due to discomfort, to do so as needed.

    The same for trips to the restroom, theyre adults and can make those decisions!

    **OBJECTIVE: Participants will introduce themselves and begin to get comfortable with group interaction, skill identification and goal-setting

    Facilitator Directions:

    Explain that we will be using this format as a way to introduce themselves to fellow participants.Name:Most Recent Occupation:Skill That I Have Demonstrated:Tentative Goal:

    Discuss that the skills may be from any area of their lives, not just the workplace.

    Discuss the fact that many participants start with no particular goal in mind, so its OK to be undecided!

    Facilitators should model the introductions by introducing themselves first, using the same four components.

    Facilitators should record the participant responses on each participant Post-It Notes wall chart for continuing use (or they may ask participants to record that information on the wall charts, depending on their comfort).**Facilitator Directions: Read the slide with the participants.

    CEW Group Objectives - To assist clients in exploring possible future employment options.- Participants will have the opportunity to learn from each others experiences.- Participants will work in a team environment in both small and large group activities in the process of developing a possible employment goal.

    *Facilitator Directions: OBJECTIVE: Participants will be made aware of the expectations of the trainers and outcomes of the Career Exploration Workshop.

    You could ask each participant to read each one of the expectations and then answer any questions -You will use this workshop as an opportunity for Career Exploration and Planning.You will develop a tentative Initial Plan for Employment.Attend all five sessions.Be on time for sessions and after breaks.Participate.Take turns speaking.Use I statements when expressing opinion.Respect others in the group and their views.Turn off cell phones.Have fun!

    Remind them that the facilitators will be listening for and helping participants to identify employability skills, through participation (written & oral), attendance, promptness in returning after breaks & lunch, flexibility, team work and other skills as appropriate.

    **

    Facilitator Directions: It is mandatory that this statement be read in full at each workshop to clients.

    As a member of this group, we ask that you respect other peoples privacy and keep what is said in the workshop confidential.

    You certainly can share your experience in the workshop but we ask that you not talk about what is said by others outside the room.

    We cannot guarantee that everything that is shared will stay in the room, so only share what you are comfortable discussing.

    *Facilitator Directions:OBJECTIVE: Encourage each participant to express their expectations for the workshop.

    Remind them that we have OUR agenda. And that includes What is theirs?

    Prompt them to respond to the two questions on the slide.- What do you hope to learn?- What would you like to get from the workshop?

    Or any other expectations they might have.

    The co-facilitator could record the responses to review later in the workshop.

    It is important to note that what they learn in the workshop needs to be shared with their appointed Vocational Rehabilitation Counselor (VRC). That may or may not be the Facilitator. No decisions or plans will be made without input from their VRC.**Facilitator Notes:OBJECTIVE: Participants will understand that they need to collaborate with their VRC in the development of their Employment Plan and goals.

    Ask them if they know who their VRC is? You probably might know this in advance.

    Remind them of the purpose of the workshop.

    Emphasize that identifying their employment goal is a mutual endeavor for them and their VRC

    **Facilitator Directions:

    Go over the broad outline/process of the workshop..

    Remind them of the workshop dates..

    Indicate that their appointments should have already been made with the VRC.

    Emphasize the importance of their responsibilities for the planning meeting (setting appt. date, bringing materials to the meeting, doing their homework, etc..as well as the follow-up meeting).

    Remind them that the facilitators are not part of the decision-making team The decision is between them and their VRCs.**Facilitator Directions:

    OBJECTIVE: Participants will be reminded of the importance of sharing their questions and comments throughout the workshop.

    This is an opportunity and process to address issues as they arise either answer them as they arise or indicate how and when they will be addressed.

    **Facilitator Directions:

    OBJECTIVE: Participants will more fully understand the background & purposes of Vocational Rehabilitation.

    Materials:Maine VR brochures or Maine VR orientation PowerPoint

    Facilitators will walk participants through the new VR orientation PowerPoint presentation.

    Facilitators will distribute the VR brochures, as needed.

    Both facilitators will answer any questions re: VR during the discussion.

    Indicate that this workshop is a VR initiative to help participants move more quickly and efficiently in developing and implementing an employment plan.

    **Facilitator Directions:

    Indicate that it is time for a break 15 minutes!

    Indicate again the location of bathrooms, smoking areas, etc.

    Give them a time to be back and remind them to be back on time.

    Be sure to provide clear directions pertinent to each individual career center, for example places to smoke, entrances to use, keyed access to security doors and where to park, and to be courteous to all people using the career centers. **Facilitator Directions:OBJECTIVE: The goal is to help Participants to become aware of the full line of services offered at the CareerCenters, both in the offices and online.

    Materials: Facilitators go to your career center and get the Job Seeker Guide brochure and the Maine Job Bank handout, list of workshops being offered by the local career center staff and Suggested Internet Sites handout.

    Facilitators could indicate that VR is just one part of the Career Centers.

    When and if possible, invite a CareerCenter staff to be a presenter.

    Following the presentation of materials by staff, ask participants if they learned anything new about CareerCenter services.

    Facilitators ask if any of the participants have used the Career Information Center and what services they used and what they would recommend. **Facilitator Notes:OBJECTIVE: Participants will learn how to use the Grid as a decision-making tool.

    The overall purpose of this workshop is to help participants gather enough information to make an informed choice about what they would like to do for employment.

    This Grid is a tool to consolidate all of the self-exploration and occupational information gathered from their exercises, discussions, and activities.

    It is critical that they enter their results for each exercise as they move through the workshop.**Facilitator Directions:

    Have some suggestions for places to eat close by so that they can return in a timely manner.

    If they plan to eat in the training room or Career Center, explain any special rules for the building.

    Give them a return-by time.**Facilitator Notes:

    You are trying to find the best fit or match for your future job; Keep in mind employers will be asking the same question Where do you fit in their world?

    It is critical to take the time to determine the best plan or idea for employment, rather than to jump at the first opportunity.

    Jumping at the first opportunity may not guarantee success, you may be going through this same process again, sooner rather than later!

    To help you determine the best idea for employment, lets do an activity that focuses on what is important to you.

    During this workshop we will be completing many activities and learning many things from each other that will help with the process of determining your path to employment.

    The first activity involves finding out what your learning style is and how that can relate to employment.

    **Facilitator Notes: OBJECTIVE: Participants will gain an understanding of their learning style and how that impacts how they learn a new job and what they like to do on the job.

    Materials: Barsch Learning Style Inventory and the blue Effective Study Tips pamphlets.

    See the following page for notes and instructions.**Facilitator Directions: OBJECTIVE: Participants will learn the importance of learning style in determining future employment goals and its utilization in the workplace.

    Why do you think were having you determine your preferred learning style?

    Knowing your preferred learning style will be helpful in any kind of training as well as in the workplace (especially learning a new job).

    Learning Styles were first noticed by Aristotle in 334 B.C., but modern study began in the early 1900s.

    Multi-sensory approaches integrated into school curricula are based on the recognition that human beings learn in multiple ways.

    **Facilitator Directions:

    Materials: Copies of the Barsch Learning Style Inventory and the blue Effective Study Tips pamphlet copies should be located in the resource cabinet on wheels.

    The Barsch Learning Style Inventory measures four different learning styles.

    **Facilitator Directions: If you have a high visual score You need to:see study materialspractice visualizing what you are learninguse charts, maps, videos, written notes, pictures, flashcards use brightly colored markerswrite things out

    Those with high visual scores tend to get the impact of materials by seeing the information. This begins the processing, organizing and storage for later retrieval. The Effective Study Tips pamphlet has many suggestions for visual learners.

    **Facilitator Directions:If you have a high auditory score You need to : use tapes for the lectures and review themsit where you can hear clearly without distractionread important points out loud to yourselfgather in study groups and learn together

    Those with High Auditory scores tend to prefer materials to which they can listen; working in groups can be very beneficial.

    **Facilitator Directions:If you have a high tactile scoreYou need to: write as you learnreview by writing things downcombine strategies with another learning stylehave paper handy to write things down

    Primary Tactile Learners benefit from understanding what their secondary mode of learning is so that they can learn from a combination of styles. **Facilitator Directions:If you have a high kinesthetic score You need to: Involve your body as part of your learningWalk while you review your notesStand up on occasion to shift your body Use physical objects to help you learn flashcards, hold onto a pen or pencil Use role-playingUse hand gestures or body language

    Primary Tactile Learners benefit from understanding what their secondary mode of learning is so that they can learn from a combination of styles.**Facilitator Directions:

    What are your two preferred learning styles?

    Do those learning styles seem to make sense for you?

    Record your learning style on the Career Decision-Making Grid, page 1, item 1, in the section titled Preferred Barsch Learning Style.

    Suggest to the participants that they place the inventory and study tips into their manual so that it does not get lost.

    **Facilitator Notes: Following are notes for the Coat of Arms Exercise.

    Explain that the Coat of Arms is a values activity which will allow them to express what is important to them and how that information may impact their future work environment. Read the directions to the group, including the instructions for each of the seven components of the Coat of Arms. Answer any questions they may have.Ask the participants to draw a picture, design or symbol to complete the exercise and we are encouraging them to use colored pencils, crayons, and other writing implements. Some individuals may find this activity unsuitable to them. Do your best to encourage them, and let them know they can do whatever they want with this activity.

    **It is very conducive to this exercise for the Facilitator to share an example of a completed Coat of Arms with the participants before they get started. This will alleviate some of the anxiety about doing the activity. Ask the participants to complete the exercise (usually 20 minutes will suffice for them to complete this activity). Let them know that they will be asked to share their work with others once completed.Remind them of the ground rules for group work:Share only what they wish to shareListen to othersBe non-judgmentalRemember that what is shared is confidential and private and stays in the room Get feedback after the exercise What did you enjoy about this exercise?Did anything make you feel uncomfortable?Did you learn anything new about yourself?*Ask them to record this information into the Career Decision-Making Grid. *Facilitator Directions:OBJECTIVE: Participants will understand how to use ERS results as a measure of readiness for employment.

    Materials: Individual copies of participants ERS results are handed out to participants.

    Remember to use the words inventory or assessment, not TEST.

    Explain the purposes of the ERS to set a baseline for their current readiness for employment

    Remind them that they will take this at least one more time to help measure their progress toward being ready to seek and keep employment.

    Explain to the group that their results are based on THEIR responses to the question during assessment. And conversations with their VR Counselor about their readiness to go to work with be based on responses they provided. And the goal is to implement a strategy to overcome any barrier to employment readiness, whether it be transportation, childcare, or geographic work area. **Facilitator Directions: Give them about 15 minutes to review their results quietly and instruct them to write down any questions that arise from their review. Tell them you will address their questions as we go through each section of the report in general terms and if questions arise specifically to the client, refer them to their VR Counselor.

    After they have reviewed the results, explain that you are beginning at the end of the report to:(1) discuss the three types of challenges and answer questions about their results;(2) identify the four types of coping supports they have and answer questions about their results; and (3) define the five employability dimensions and what their scores indicate.

    Begin with the 3 types of challenges - Help them to identify other types of personal challenges; emphasize that these are challenge areas that are under their control making sure to take prescribed medications, arranging a support of people to help the transition to work, making sure you have the right clothes for interviewing and working, keeping your hair presentable and teeth brushed.

    Remind them that these are Challenges, not barriers, meaning they can be resolved.**Facilitator Directions:

    Have them think and talk about the challenges of environmental responsibilities and how that might impact their readiness to go to work.

    Ask if they can think of other types of environmental challenges, the challenges usually involve other people or responsibilities that impact their lives they may be responsible for their care, or need to help with chores or going to the doctors. **Facilitator Directions: Indicate that there are a number of systems that they are and/or will have to deal with.

    Ask them to brainstorm some other examples of systemic challenges.

    Be sure to encourage clients to seek out people who can help them because there are usually other systems that can help them to overcome some of these challenges.Case ManagersAdult education programsAlpha OneMany colleges have open housesMaine Education Opportunities Association ClubhousesOther agencies, i.e. Bayside and WestsideNAMIBrain Injury Information Association**Facilitator Directions:

    Define what the low, medium and high mean on their feedback reports remembering that the results are based on their responses.

    This will help them determine what areas they need to focus on first and find strategies for that area in order to be ready and available for work.

    You can suggest that areas of High Challenge may be something they will have to discuss and resolve with their VR Counselor. If there is more than one area of need, they will prioritize with their counselor what will be looked at first.

    **Facilitator Directions:Remind them that these are the means or supports which help them cope with the challenges they face. You may face a number of barriers or challenges that act as stressors and can be incapacitating if not managed well. You may be facing significant challenges without assistance in handling them that may cause you to fail at work even if you are successful in getting a job.

    Go over the definition of each support, because some of these are terms they may not be familiar with, especially Self-Efficacy and Outcome Expectancy.

    You could ask them to put the definitions in their own words; ask for volunteers.

    Ask them how they can use or improve each of these support areas

    Stress the importance of these supports in coping with any challenges they are facing. It could be a flat tire. This is why having a support system in place is so important.

    **Facilitator Directions:Have them look at the bar graph picture of their supportsReview the slide above to indicate what the report shows

    Remind them that all areas of the ERS can be improved by working with their counselor on increasing the supports and coping skills.

    Remind the participants that the purpose is to find interventions or ways to overcome the challenges so they are not an area of stress or a barrier any longer. This is not about pointing out problems, but finding solutions. Our clients have lots of strengths. **Facilitator Directions: Review each of the 5 employability dimensions and be sure to ask the questions in the group and give people time to respond. The goal is to help them realize how much responsibility they have in this process.

    Indicate that each of these 5 areas are really skill areas related to the entire employment process and is what VR does with people.

    You could ask them to give an example of a skill in each of the 5 areas.

    Remind them to read the boxed sections of their feedback report because these are customized responses, commentaries, suggestions related to each of their scores.

    **Facilitator Directions:Direct the participants to the Career Decision-Making Grid to enter what they learned from the assessment.

    Ask if there are any other questions related to this inventory; be sure to direct them to their counselor with specific concerns.

    Remind them that their ERS feedback reports will be a topic of conversation when they meet with their VRC; writing this down will help them remember what they want to talk about during this meeting.

    State that this first take of the ERS is a baseline of their employment readiness and that they will re-take this assessment at the end of the workshop.

    Direct participants to be sure to save their report and insert it into their portfolio.

    **Facilitator Directions:

    We are now going to do an exercise that will demonstrate how you spend your time

    Have them retrieve the PIE exercise handout, including the instructions on one side and the two-pie figures on the other sideGive an overview of the Life and Work Balance exercise reading the instructions in part one.Answer any question they may have and instruct them to think about how they allocate their time during a week, month, etc. and then divide the Current pie into 3 sections, one for each of the types of needs Self, Others and Work.

    Give them about 5-10 minutes to draw their pie.

    Once they have all finished drawing their pies, discuss in the group.

    Do exercise -**Facilitator Directions:

    Review this slide and direct them to discuss how and why they divided their time accordingly.

    Give them about 10 minutes to discuss and share their pie allocations.

    Ask if there were any surprises.

    Indicate that we will be looking at their time allocations for the future later in the workshop.

    Have them indicate their allocations on their Career Decision-Making Grid on Page 1, item 5.

    If there is a large group, you could break into smaller groups.

    **Facilitator Directions:

    Be sure to give group a return time.**Facilitator Directions:OBJECTIVE: Participants will understand the importance of determining their interests and personality types in selecting an employment goal.

    Materials: Access to a Holland-based interest inventory, either the O*NET, California Career inventory, Texas DOL inventory or Hollands Self-Directed Search

    Holland Poster on the wall, three-hole punch if you have one; or they could put it in the front of the manual.

    Indicate to participants that each inventory highlights a different component of who they are as individuals.

    Emphasize that this inventory will focus on what kinds of activities they like to do.

    Remind them that this inventory is really helping them define their personality characteristics, based on their preference for particular activities, more so than a search for a favorite job.

    Indicate that they will then use those preferences to make initial connections with particular occupations.**Facilitator Directions:

    Indicate which Holland Interest Profiler will be used (O*NET, California Career inventory, Texas DOL inventory or Hollands Self-Directed Search)

    Using the slide content, it is critical that they be given appropriate instructions, so they understand how they make their decisions.

    Remind them that their answers are painting a personality picture, not just selecting random activities. Their answers and personality type will provide connections to interests, jobs, skills, leisure activities, values, as related to employment. **Facilitator Directions:Instruct participants to go to the computers and take the identified inventory.

    It typically takes about 20-30 minutes to complete the inventory.

    Make sure participants print their results before they exit from the software.**Materials: Individual inventory results, Holland handout (in notebook)

    Facilitator Directions:

    Explain that these inventories are all based on Dr. John Hollands theory that explains that people choose activities that are compatible with who they are (personality types)

    People also choose work environments (jobs) that are compatible with those types,

    Have them look at Handout: Holland Types this outlines the characteristics of each of the 6 types,

    This provides the background for the Holland-type inventories.

    Indicate that Holland-type inventories are probably the most respected interest inventories in the country.basis for others .the Strong, Harrington-OShea and others

    **Facilitator Directions:Materials: Holland Poster or Handout with the Holland Material

    This Hexagon contains the Holland Types, which are referred to as the RIASEC types: R Realistic; I Investigative; A Artistic; S Social; E Enterprising; C Conventional

    Refer to Holland Poster, if you have one available.

    Briefly read the characteristics of each type, and ask participants to suggest an occupation for each type.

    After you discuss each Type, ask each participant if they would like to share their two-letter type, dependent on their two highest scores - i.e., SA or RI, etc.

    Ask each participant if these descriptions are accurate descriptions of who they are. Consequently, these are a good indicator of the validity of the Holland inventory.

    You could then ask the participants to record their 2 or 3 letter results on the Wall charts or a flip chart.**Facilitator Directions:

    Explain to the participants that this slide shows the Common Names for the RIASEC, which indicate the common skill type of each Holland Type.Realistic DoersInvestigative ThinkersArtistic CreatorsSocial HelpersEnterprising PersuadersConventional - Organizers

    For some, these titles may be a little easier to remember and explain.**Facilitator Directions:Ask which of the Holland types primarily works with each of the following items: Data, Things, Ideas and PeopleRealistic Doers - ThingsInvestigative Thinkers - IdeasArtistic Creators - IdeasSocial Helpers - PeopleEnterprising Persuaders - PeopleConventional Organizers - Data

    To maintain the connections between the three slides, all three versions are listed above.

    These connections give a little more definition to each of the types, talking about what they primarily use to do their work or what they could see them doing for work.

    Indicate to participants that we will be referencing these terms later, in relation to skills, leisure activities, etc. **Facilitator Directions:

    Discuss with participants their two highest preferences and if these match what they know about themselves. **Facilitator Directions:Some of the instruments that are used will refer to Job Zones as a way for participants to select employment categorizes, or the feedback or interpretive reports will be printed according to Job Zone.

    So these two slides will help participants to understand Job Zones and how they relate to employment.

    The next slides will explain the amount and type of preparation needed for each Job Zone.

    **Facilitator Directions: Optional if taking the O*NET inventory or other self directed Holland-Based inventory.If participants take the O*NET Interest Inventory, the inventory requires them to select a Job Zone in order to print the employment related results. (remember that WOWi also talks about job zones, too.)

    Job Zones, as outlined above, provide an indication of how much Preparation Time they are willing to invest in training and or Experience in order to get their next job.

    The software directions provide examples.

    Ask for an example of a job in Zone 1.

    Ask for an example of a job in Zone 5.

    So, participants will have to decide with their VR Counselor what is realistic for preparation time before they become employed. **Facilitator Directions:

    Ask participants to record their results in the Career Decision-Making Grid.

    **Facilitator Directions:

    OBJECTIVE: Participants will learn how to document their achievements, extract the skills and choose the skills they wish to use in future employment.

    Materials:Discuss the rationale for the Achievement Story exercise: Many people have difficulty defining their skills. Skills are critical to getting a job. Many of our skills are buried in our past achievements in long-term memory. We can recall some of these skills by talking about how we demonstrated them in our achievements. Other people can help us fill in the blanks by listening to our stories. Telling your achievement story can help document a whole range of skills .Many of these skills and achievements can become the language of your resumes and prepare for interviewing.**Facilitator Directions:You could tell the participants that these are Achievements as defined by Richard Bolles and Bernard Haldane, two giants in the job choice and job search process which needs to be read to the group.

    At this point, the Facilitator may want to give examples from their own life about an achievement or accomplishment that was important to them. (Remember that the achievement story activity is coming in a few slides.)

    You also may want the group to brainstorm some ideas or examples.

    The following activity will help individuals to generate a list of examples of achievements and accomplishments from their own lives.

    You could share with the group that many of us are trained or encouraged not to brag about our skills, and as a result, so much of our skills and accomplishments tend to get buried in our long-term memory and never shared.

    The following exercise and its results are an attempt to help participants take credit for the good things they have accomplished and to possibly use some of those buried skills in their future employment.**Facilitator Directions:Materials: Handout in your portfolio Acknowledging your AchievementsTell the participants that this is a tool that will help them take a look at four different areas of their lives Work, Leisure, Learning & Personal.Point out that the handout is divided into four of those areas to help them focus on one achievement at a time.

    Homework: All we want is the titles or main point of their accomplishments in those spaces. Some may be blank, others may have more than one accomplishment. This will become their source for choosing 3 achievement stories to write about or draw or tell about.

    We encourage them to go back as far as they can remember and not to assume it was not important because it happened many years ago.

    And they shouldnt assume that skills from areas other than the workplace are not important. Ironically, many participants choose and document achievements from their leisure or personal areas, not the workplace.**Facilitator Directions:The Acknowledging your Achievements exercise will help participants come up with their lists of possible stories, and your demonstration will help them to hear what telling a story will be like. It has a beginning, a middle and an end, and it is talking about one thing.

    One of the facilitators or a willing participant will give a brief example of an achievement, outlining the main components.

    The other facilitator will document these story pieces on newsprint or a dry-erase board.

    Participants will then be asked to brainstorm the skills that were demonstrated in those components, as well as ask the story teller to elaborate on missing pieces of the story, from which new skills can be gleaned.

    The facilitator-recorder will document the skills as they are reported by the participants.

    Facilitators will then ask if there are any questions about the Achievement Story process.**Facilitator Directions: Ask that participants write down their immediate impressions of any of the activities that they participated in today or reactions to exercises. Give them about five minutes.

    Facilitators may wish to go over these at the beginning of Day Two.

    The questions above are simply to prompt them to think and react.

    Thank them for their participation and hard work and indicate that we will reconvene tomorrow.

    *