Building the future we want promoting disaster resilient nations Building the future we want promoting

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    Mariana Osihn

    UNISDR Regional Office for Europe

    www.unisdr.org

    Building the future we want

    promoting disaster resilient nations

    and communities

    Framtidens byar, Sandnes, Norway

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    UNISDR – United Nations Office for Disaster Risk

    Reduction

    The SRSG – The UN Special Representative of the Secretary-General

    for Disaster Risk Reduction – Ms. Margareta Wahlstrom

    Offices

    • HQ Geneva

    • 5 regional offices (Brussels, Bangkok, Cairo, Panama, Nairobi)

    • 2 Liaison offices (New York, Kobe)

    • 100 staff globally

    UNISDR Europe Office

    • Brussels

    • 40 countries and EU Institutions

    • Ms. Paola Albrito

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    Coordinate: (How Organise: GP, RP, NP)

    international efforts disaster risk reduction

    and provide guidance for the implementation

    of the HFA and monitor its implementation.

    Advocate: (Encourage - Climate Change,

    Education, Gender, MDG) for greater

    investment in disaster risk reduction actions

    to protect people’s lives and assets.

    Campaign: (Promote – Making Cities

    Resilient, Safe Schools and Hospitals

    Sasakawa Award)

    Inform: (Provide – GAR, HFA Report,

    Terminology, PreventionWeb)

    United Nations Office for Disaster Risk Reduction

    (UNISDR) main functions

    http://www.unisdr.org/campaign/resilientcities/

    http://www.unisdr.org/we/inform/publications/19846

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    Disaster Risk Reduction (DRR)

    • Reducing the risk of natural hazards (floods, droughts, earthquakes, storms)

    • Disasters often follow natural hazards and a disaster's severity depends on how

    much impact a hazard has on society and the environment

    • DRR is the concept and practice of reducing disaster risks through systematic

    efforts to analyze and reduce the causal factors of disasters.

    • Disaster risk reduction examples

    • Reducing exposure to hazards

    • Lessening vulnerability of people and property

    • Wise management of land and the environment, and

    • Improving preparedness for adverse events

    • DRR includes disciplines like disaster management, disaster mitigation and

    disaster preparedness and is also part of sustainable development.

    • DRR is everybody's business

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     Greater exposure to natural and human-

    induced hazards, climate change and

    variability

     Socio-economic drivers: poverty and

    unsustainable development, unplanned

    urban growth and migrations, lack of risk

    awareness and institutional capacities...

     Physical drivers: insufficient land use

    planning, housing & critical infrastructure

    located in hazard prone areas...

     Environmental degradation: ecosystem

    and natural resource depletion (coastal,

    watershed, wetlands, forests…)

    VULNERABILITY

    HAZARDS +

    EXTREME EVENTS

    Disasters are NOT natural

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    Hyogo Framework for Action 2005-2015:

    Building the resilience of nations and communities to disasters

    Five priorities for action

    1. Governance: ensure that disaster risk reduction is a national and local priority with strong institutional basis for implementation

    2. Risk identification: identify, assess and monitor disaster risks and enhance early warning

    3. Knowledge: use knowledge, innovation and education to build a culture of safety and resilience at all levels

    4. Reducing the underlying risk factors in various sectors (environment, health, construction, etc.)

    5. Strengthen disaster preparedness for effective response

    Words Into Action: A Guide for Implementing the Hyogo Framework

    www.unisdr.org/eng/hfa/docs/Words-into-action/Words-Into-Action.pdf

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    Vulnerability in Europe • In 2012, natural disasters caused $160 billion in global economic overall losses.

    • 2011 was the costliest year ever in terms of natural catastrophe losses with

    US$ 380 billion in global economic losses. 302 disasters claimed 29,782 lives and affected 206 million people. 2005, the previous record year with losses of US$ 220bn.

    • Europe’s 10-year average of disaster losses totaling US$13.4 billion makes it the third most affected region in the world after the Americas and Asia.

    • 2010 the biggest increase in disaster occurrence (+18.2%) compared to the decade’s average;

    • 2002 and 2011 there were 4130 disaster recorded, resulting from natural hazards around the world where 1,117,527 people perished and a minimum of US$1,195 billion was recorded in losses.

    • The Global Assessment Report on Disaster Risk Reduction released in 2011 indicates that in OECD countries the risk of economic losses is now growing faster than their average GDP growth;

    • Most of the damages are due to climatological and hydrometeorological events;

    Reduced number of Human but High Economic Losses

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    HFA Focal Points and NPs in Europe Region

    Out of 46 Countries:

    38 have designated HFA Focal Points

    Albania, Armenia, Austria, Bosnia & Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, France, Georgia, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Italy, the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Malta, Moldova, Monaco, Montenegro, The Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Russian Federation, Serbia, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Turkey, Ukraine, United Kingdom.

    22 Countries have developed a National Platforms:

    Armenia, Bulgaria, Czech Republic, Croatia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, France, Finland, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Italy, Monaco, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Russian Federation, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, The Netherlands, Turkey, United Kingdom.

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    Linkages between Disaster Risk Reduction

    and Climate Change Adaptation

    Disaster risk reduction and adaptation to climate change share

    the same ultimate goal of reducing vulnerability to weather and

    climate related hazards.

    Natural hazards by themselves are not disasters – it is the

    combination of an exposed, vulnerable and ill-prepared

    population or community with a hazard event that results in a

    disaster.

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    Climate change will affect disaster risks in two ways:

    – Firstly through the likely increase in weather and climate related hazards

    – Secondly through increases in the vulnerability of communities to natural hazards, particularly through ecosystem degradation, reductions in water and food availability, changes to livelihoods, and rapid unplanned urban growth.

    Linkages between Disaster Risk Reduction and

    Climate Change Adaptation

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    Making Cities Resilient: My City is Getting Ready!

    2010 – 2011 (2012-2015) World Disaster Reduction Campaign

    • Launched in 2010 in Bonn

    • Building on the previous

    World Disaster Reduction

    Campaign – Safer Schools

    and Hospitals

    Objectives:

    Achieve resilient, sustainable

    urban communities through

    actions taken by local

    governments to reduce disaster

    risk

    Know More

    Invest Wisely

    Build More Safely

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    Making Cities Resilient: My City is Getting Ready!

    Partners

    Building an alliance of local governments with relevant actors -

    community groups, academic institutions, business associations, NGOs

    and CBOs to ensure participation in planning and decision-making for

    risk reduction.

     City associations/networks: UCLG, EMI, CityNet, Metropolis, ICLEI

     National Associations of Local Governments

     National Platforms and HFA focal points

     International partner institutions (UN agencies such as UN-Habitat,

    UNDP, ILO, WHO, World Bank, UNICEF and IFRC)

     Civil society: Community-based organizations, NGOs, academic

    institutions, business associations…

     Some regions have a network, task force or platform focusing on

    urban disaster risk reduction (e.g. Asia Task Force on Urban Risk)

     Regional

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