1
59 and:the engine is kept oiled and cooled, it is unlikely to need replacement. If it does, it is the owner’s fault for failing to safeguard against avoidable risks. BRISTOL AND THE WESTERN COUNTIES. (FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENTS.) lord Haldane Eleoted to the Chanoellorship of Bristol University. AT a meeting of the University Court on Dec. 20th the Right Hon. Lewis Fry, who presided, proposed the election of Lord Haldane to succeed the late Mr. Henry Overton Wills as Chancellor. He spoke of the strong impetus to the extension of university education which Lord Haldane had given by work and word, and referred to the great powers of organisation which he had shown at the War Office. He spoke also of the distinction he had attained as a student of philosophy, and said that there was no one who would impart greater honour to the University than Lord Haldane. The proposition, having been supported by Mr. G. A. Wills, Professor T. H. Warren (President of Magdalen College, Oxford), Sir Isambard Owen (the Vice-Chancellor of the University), and others, was carried unanimously. It is understood that Lord Haldane will address the University during 1912 if his engagements permit. Bnstol Medical Jlen and the Insecrance Act. On Dec. 19th over 208 members of the medical pro- fession met in the small hall of the University under the auspices of the Bristol division of the British Medical Association to hear a report of the recent representative meeting from Dr. George Parker and to discuss the situa- tion. All the unfortunate bitterness and useless spirit of faction which have been only too conspicuous at some such meetings in the country were happily absent. This was due in large measure to the statesmanlike speech of the chair- man, Mr. H. F. Devis, who said that much as the present position was to be deplored it was unfair to throw all the blame on the Council of the Association, since they were only carrying out the policy to which they had been committed by the Association’s representatives. He regarded the outlook as gloomy, the position being this: that the securing of reasonable terms under the Act depended entirely on the local strength of the pro- fession and the pressure which could be brought to bear upon the Health Committees. Nevertheless, he felt hopeful that the federation scheme put forward by the Bristol division would be accepted by the Association and by the profession as a whole, and that if so there would be an organisation powerful enough t3 fight successfully all the public bodies with whom the profession would be brought into contact. The principles of the proposed federation were explained by Mr. G. Scott Williamson-viz., democratic control, financial guarantee against loss due to the action of the federation, cooperative powers, recognition of vested interests, full money-raising powers, and unrestricted control over its own funds. Each member would pay an entrance fee of 2 and an annual subscription of 1 5s. After signing the memo- randum of federation, as each member would have to do, he would make himself thereby liable for .E5 in the event of i winding up, and only in that event. Resolutions urging the adoption of this scheme by the Council of the Association, authorising its advertisement throughout the profession, and resolving upon a provisional call to local practitioners, were unanimously agreed to. The Bristol inti-tvberezclosis Dispensary. Bristol stands committed to the support of a tuberculosis dispensary similar in most respects to those already at work in Edinburgh, Paddington, and elsewhere. A house has been taken and furnished in RedclifE-parade, close to the principal thoroughfare connecting the centre of Bristol with densely populated areas on the Somerset side of the Avon, and only five minutes’ walk from Bristol Bridge. For the first year, at least, it will depend upon a large sum of money given to equip and start the work by a lady who felt that such an institution was needed in Bristol. A whole-time medical officer, with previous experience in a similar institution, has been appointed, and the work will actually begin early in the year. It is being administered in connexion with the Civic League of Personal Service, which has absorbed and replaced the Charity Organisation Society in Bristol. Bristol is to be congratulated on priority in one respect ; this dispensary is the first, I believe, to make definite terms with the local profession before starting. Patients will not be received unless they come from a qualified medical practi- tioner. This should prove a useful precedent in the solution of the out-patient problem, which demands solution nowhere more urgently than in Bristol. Jan. 2nd. WALES. (FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENT.) z Tubero-ulosis in the Rhondda Valleys. IN a report to the Rhondda urban district council on the compulsory notification of pulmonary tuberculosis, the medical officer of health, Dr. J. D. Jenkins, expresses the opinion that if suitable measures are taken in conjunction with the notification, and if those measures are prosecuted with thoroughness, diligence, and tact, it may be possible to eradicate the disease. The average yearly death-rate from phthisis in the Rhondda during the past ten years has been 0-96 per 1000 of the population. Dr. Jenkins estimates, therefore, that there are at the present time between 400 and 500 cases in this district, which has a population of nearly 160,000 persons. He considers that the steps to be taken as the result of notification should include advice to the patient and friends by officers of the council, with general instruc- tions for the prevention of infection ; the establishment of a tuberculosis dispensary and of an observation station-these for treatment as well as for the purpose of education in the adoption of means designed to prevent the spread of the disease and to maintain and improve the patient’s condition after return home ; and the formation of open-air schools. The observation station recommended could most suitably be established as an annex to the council’s isolation hospital, for reasons bearing upon management, administration, and facilities for treatment, and could most conveniently be run in close connexion with a tuberculosis dispensary, which would naturally form the out-patient department of the observation station. Veriiiinous Sahool Children in Carniarthenqhire. It is to be regretted that in his determined efforts to improve the physical condition of the Carmarthenshire school children the school medical officer of that county, Mr. D. A. Hughes, is not receiving adequate support from the members of the local education authority. He reported some time ago to the authority that in particular schools there was present a large number of verminous children, but no action such as is possible under the Children Act was taken, so that the only course open to him was to exclude the children in question from school attendance. This action brought down the average attendance so largely that the chairman and other members of the authority raised a protest and appeared to consider that it was quite a normal condition for a child to be infested with vermin and lice. The school medical officer, said one member, had very excellent theories, but it was a question whether the country had progressed sufficiently to enable them to be put into practice. For hundreds of years the children had been taught in a dirty condition, and if they were going to take drastic measures to change the habits of the people they would only bring the authority into disfavour. Cardiff Mental Hospital. The latest report of the Commissioners in Lunacy on the Cardiff Mental Hospital bears testimony to the excellent research work that is being carried out in the pathological laboratories attached to the institution. Mr. R. V. Stanford, M.Sc., a few months ago was appointed research chemist to the hospital, and Dr. H. A. Schölberg, who has been acting temporarily as pathologist, has now been appointed per- manently to that position. In 1910 the recovery rate of the asylum, as reckoned on the total admissions of the year, was 46, 7 per cent., an increase of 11-3 per cent. on the rate of the previous year. As many as 81- 5 per cent. of those who recovered were discharged within ten months of their admission. Jan. 2nd.

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and:the engine is kept oiled and cooled, it is unlikely to needreplacement. If it does, it is the owner’s fault for failing tosafeguard against avoidable risks.

BRISTOL AND THE WESTERN COUNTIES.

(FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENTS.)

lord Haldane Eleoted to the Chanoellorship of BristolUniversity.

AT a meeting of the University Court on Dec. 20th the

Right Hon. Lewis Fry, who presided, proposed the electionof Lord Haldane to succeed the late Mr. Henry OvertonWills as Chancellor. He spoke of the strong impetus to theextension of university education which Lord Haldane hadgiven by work and word, and referred to the great powers oforganisation which he had shown at the War Office. He

spoke also of the distinction he had attained as a student ofphilosophy, and said that there was no one who would impartgreater honour to the University than Lord Haldane. The

proposition, having been supported by Mr. G. A. Wills,Professor T. H. Warren (President of Magdalen College,Oxford), Sir Isambard Owen (the Vice-Chancellor of theUniversity), and others, was carried unanimously. It isunderstood that Lord Haldane will address the Universityduring 1912 if his engagements permit.

Bnstol Medical Jlen and the Insecrance Act.

On Dec. 19th over 208 members of the medical pro-fession met in the small hall of the University underthe auspices of the Bristol division of the British MedicalAssociation to hear a report of the recent representativemeeting from Dr. George Parker and to discuss the situa-tion. All the unfortunate bitterness and useless spirit offaction which have been only too conspicuous at some suchmeetings in the country were happily absent. This was duein large measure to the statesmanlike speech of the chair-man, Mr. H. F. Devis, who said that much as the presentposition was to be deplored it was unfair to throw allthe blame on the Council of the Association, since theywere only carrying out the policy to which they hadbeen committed by the Association’s representatives. He

regarded the outlook as gloomy, the position beingthis: that the securing of reasonable terms under theAct depended entirely on the local strength of the pro-fession and the pressure which could be brought to bearupon the Health Committees. Nevertheless, he felt hopefulthat the federation scheme put forward by the Bristol divisionwould be accepted by the Association and by the professionas a whole, and that if so there would be an organisationpowerful enough t3 fight successfully all the public bodieswith whom the profession would be brought into contact.The principles of the proposed federation were explained byMr. G. Scott Williamson-viz., democratic control, financialguarantee against loss due to the action of the federation,cooperative powers, recognition of vested interests, full

money-raising powers, and unrestricted control over its ownfunds. Each member would pay an entrance fee of 2 andan annual subscription of 1 5s. After signing the memo-randum of federation, as each member would have to do, hewould make himself thereby liable for .E5 in the event of i

winding up, and only in that event. Resolutions urging theadoption of this scheme by the Council of the Association,authorising its advertisement throughout the profession, andresolving upon a provisional call to local practitioners, wereunanimously agreed to.

The Bristol inti-tvberezclosis Dispensary.Bristol stands committed to the support of a tuberculosis

dispensary similar in most respects to those already at workin Edinburgh, Paddington, and elsewhere. A house has beentaken and furnished in RedclifE-parade, close to the principalthoroughfare connecting the centre of Bristol with denselypopulated areas on the Somerset side of the Avon, and onlyfive minutes’ walk from Bristol Bridge. For the first year,at least, it will depend upon a large sum of money givento equip and start the work by a lady who felt that such aninstitution was needed in Bristol. A whole-time medicalofficer, with previous experience in a similar institution, hasbeen appointed, and the work will actually begin early in theyear. It is being administered in connexion with the Civic

League of Personal Service, which has absorbed and replacedthe Charity Organisation Society in Bristol. Bristol is to be

congratulated on priority in one respect ; this dispensaryis the first, I believe, to make definite terms withthe local profession before starting. Patients will not bereceived unless they come from a qualified medical practi-tioner. This should prove a useful precedent in the solutionof the out-patient problem, which demands solution nowheremore urgently than in Bristol.Jan. 2nd.

__________________

WALES.(FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENT.) z

Tubero-ulosis in the Rhondda Valleys.IN a report to the Rhondda urban district council on the

compulsory notification of pulmonary tuberculosis, the medicalofficer of health, Dr. J. D. Jenkins, expresses the opinionthat if suitable measures are taken in conjunction with thenotification, and if those measures are prosecuted withthoroughness, diligence, and tact, it may be possible toeradicate the disease. The average yearly death-rate fromphthisis in the Rhondda during the past ten years has been0-96 per 1000 of the population. Dr. Jenkins estimates,therefore, that there are at the present time between 400 and500 cases in this district, which has a population of nearly160,000 persons. He considers that the steps to be taken as theresult of notification should include advice to the patientand friends by officers of the council, with general instruc-tions for the prevention of infection ; the establishment of atuberculosis dispensary and of an observation station-thesefor treatment as well as for the purpose of education in theadoption of means designed to prevent the spread of thedisease and to maintain and improve the patient’s conditionafter return home ; and the formation of open-air schools.The observation station recommended could most suitably beestablished as an annex to the council’s isolation hospital,for reasons bearing upon management, administration, andfacilities for treatment, and could most conveniently be runin close connexion with a tuberculosis dispensary, whichwould naturally form the out-patient department of theobservation station.

Veriiiinous Sahool Children in Carniarthenqhire.It is to be regretted that in his determined efforts to

improve the physical condition of the Carmarthenshire schoolchildren the school medical officer of that county, Mr. D. A.Hughes, is not receiving adequate support from the membersof the local education authority. He reported some time agoto the authority that in particular schools there was presenta large number of verminous children, but no action suchas is possible under the Children Act was taken, so

that the only course open to him was to exclude thechildren in question from school attendance. This actionbrought down the average attendance so largely thatthe chairman and other members of the authority raised aprotest and appeared to consider that it was quite a normalcondition for a child to be infested with vermin and lice.The school medical officer, said one member, had veryexcellent theories, but it was a question whether the countryhad progressed sufficiently to enable them to be put intopractice. For hundreds of years the children had beentaught in a dirty condition, and if they were going to takedrastic measures to change the habits of the people theywould only bring the authority into disfavour.

Cardiff Mental Hospital.The latest report of the Commissioners in Lunacy on the

Cardiff Mental Hospital bears testimony to the excellentresearch work that is being carried out in the pathologicallaboratories attached to the institution. Mr. R. V. Stanford,M.Sc., a few months ago was appointed research chemist tothe hospital, and Dr. H. A. Schölberg, who has been actingtemporarily as pathologist, has now been appointed per-manently to that position. In 1910 the recovery rate of theasylum, as reckoned on the total admissions of the year, was46, 7 per cent., an increase of 11-3 per cent. on the rate ofthe previous year. As many as 81- 5 per cent. of those whorecovered were discharged within ten months of theiradmission.Jan. 2nd.