Breast cancer screening 93.07.23. Recommendations for breast cancer screening چه شواهدی برای خطر وجود دارد؟ برای غربالگری چه باید کرد؟

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    23-Dec-2015

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<ul><li> Slide 1 </li> <li> Breast cancer screening 93.07.23 </li> <li> Slide 2 </li> <li> Slide 3 </li> <li> Slide 4 </li> <li> Recommendations for breast cancer screening </li> <li> Slide 5 </li> <li> Evidence about the risk of the condition: </li> <li> Slide 6 </li> <li> The incidence of breast cancer in developed countries is high compared to under-developed countries: o USA 2014, Estimated new cases; 232,670 o USA2014, Estimated Death; 40,000 o 89.7 per 100,000 women in Western Europe. o 19.3 per 100,000 women in Eastern Africa The incidence of breast cancer is increasing in the developing world due to: o Increase life expectancy, o Increase urbanization and o Adoption of western lifestyles. o Risk reduction with prevention, cannot eliminate the majority of breast cancers that develop in low- and middle-income countries where breast cancer is diagnosed in very late stages. o Breast cancer survival rates vary greatly worldwide, 80% or over in North America, Sweden and Japan 60% in middle-income countries Below 40% in low-income countries o Although breast cancer is thought to be a disease of the developed world, almost 50% of breast cancer cases and 58% of deaths occur in less developed countries Why Screening? Early detection to improve breast cancer outcome and survival remains the cornerstone of breast cancer control. </li> <li> Slide 7 </li> <li> How? Population-based cancer screening Done in the context of high-standard programmes Target all the population at risk in a given geographical area with high specific cancer burden Everyone who takes part being offered the same level of screening, diagnosis and treatment services WHO promotes breast cancer control within the context of national cancer control programmes and integrated to noncommunicable disease prevention and control. Cost-effective when started early. </li> <li> Slide 8 </li> <li> RISK FACTORS </li> <li> Slide 9 </li> <li> Slide 10 </li> <li> Breast cancer risk management </li> <li> Slide 11 </li> <li> Family history of premenopausal bilateral breast cancer or Family history of premenopausal bilateral breast cancer or Premenopausal breast cancer in a mother and sister, Premenopausal breast cancer in a mother and sister, Breast and ovarian cancer in close relatives, Breast and ovarian cancer in close relatives, Evidence of genetic susceptibility in mutations of BRCA1 or BRCA2 (and p53) (35-85%, lifetime), Evidence of genetic susceptibility in mutations of BRCA1 or BRCA2 (and p53) (35-85%, lifetime), Personal history of lobular carcinoma in situ, atypical hyperplasia, Personal history of lobular carcinoma in situ, atypical hyperplasia, Mammographic density occupying more than 75% of the breast volume. Mammographic density occupying more than 75% of the breast volume. </li> <li> Slide 12 </li> <li> Slide 13 </li> <li> Weak risk factors (risk up to two times normal) are: o Family history of postmenopausal breast cancer, o High socioeconomic status, o Nulliparity, o Later age at first birth (&gt;30 years versus 55 years versus </li></ul>