Bowen Island Undercurrent July 24 2015

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Bowen Island Undercurrent July 24 2015

Text of Bowen Island Undercurrent July 24 2015

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    FRIDAYJULY 24, 2015VOL . 4 2 , NO . 2 6

    Moving on...Parting words from an editor andcolumnist...

    Healthcare on BowenMore information required to moveforward

    With love from the NookA send-off to Bowen grads

    More than two decades of work, and all we got was this sign, Paul Hooson.Meribeth Deen, photo

    MERIBETH DEENE D I T O R

    Over the past two decades, you are more likelyto have seen Paul Hooson getting theatri-cal in the municipal hall than you are tohave seen him on-stage at Tir-na-Nog or Cates HillChapel. The clown and puppeteer says the reason forthat is because hes not an actor just a champion forthe theatre arts on Bowen Island.Last Monday, Hooson stood before council yet

    again, offering a brief history of the committeesstruck and reports written in an effort to move for-ward plans for a community hall on Bowen. Afterwrapping up, he told council that this presentationwould be his last.Im feeling resigned, said Hooson in an interview

    following the meeting. Im not sure if thats a stageof grief, but thats where Im at.In the report he wrote up for council, called

    Bowen Island Community Hall: A work in progress,or a project neglected? Hooson lays out possiblenext steps for moving the project forward, but sayshes not optimistic that they will be taken.His presentation to council last week, he says, was

    motivated by the fact that as each new council hasassumed leadership it has misinterpreted the workand objectives of the Arts Council.I wanted to set the record straight before I quit,

    he says. What we want is a Community Hall, not aCommunity Center: a modest, multi-purpose spacefor the performing arts and public assembly.Among the uses of this kind of space, he adds,

    would be weddings and banquets as well as softrecreational activities such as yoga, and various kindsof seniors activities.Hooson started his quest for such a space back in

    1993, when he played the role of an advisor on thetheatre aspect of a Community and PerformingArts Centre for the Bowen Island Parks andRecreation Task Force.

    Hoosons last stand

    continued PAGE 3

    After 22 years working to create a communityhall, theatre advocate Paul Hooson moves on

    MERIBETH DEENE D I T O R

    Over the past three years, Bowenbeekeepers Ian Kennard and NancyLeonard have seen their hives getstronger and stronger. Prior to 2013,says Kennard, between 40 and 50 per-cent of their bees died over the winter.In 2013, 90 percent of their bees sur-vived, and in this past winter, 100 per-cent of their bees survived. It turns out,though, that a majority of their bees donot in fact carry the traits that makethem resistant to disease hygienictraits, technically speaking. Thisnews comes with new technology thatKennard, Leonard and other BowenIsland bee keepers will assist to testover the coming three years.As UBC professor Leonard Foster

    explains, bee breeding technology hasbeen stuck in the dark ages as com-pared to methods used in other agri-cultural sectors. Until Foster and histeam embarked on this recent projectto improve it, bee breeders had no wayof knowing which bees had the genetic

    traits that would help them resist dis-ease and survive the winter.Most bee keepers in Canada get

    their bees from either Hawaii or NewZealand. Theyre not used to the coldand most dont survive long enoughto adapt, so the bee keepers get newones every few years, says Foster, add-ing that a minority of bee keepers, likeKennard and Leonard, breed the sur-vivors and in doing so create bees thatare adapted to this climate.It is pretty well recognized that

    the solution that offers the most hopefor the industry in terms of bee deathis selecting for bees that are strongerand more economically viable, whichis not a shocking conclusion, saysFoster. But the tools that people haveto do the selection have not been there.Weve tried to bring modern molecu-lar techniques that would be usedin a hospital, for example, and applythose tools to honey bees. Last yearsproject, found a way to quickly andeasily determine whether a bee wouldbe hygienic or not based on the pres-ence of a group of proteins in the beesgenetic material.

    Bowen to become closedcolony for honey bees

    continued PAGE 3

    Bee keepers Nancy Leonard, Ian Kennard and research technicianHeather Higo inspect a frame of drones brought to Bowen from theFraser Valley.Meribeth Deen, photo

    You can immediately see why this magical, 5.8 acre property is know as Island Springs. To yourleft as you drive in are three ponds stacked upon the hillside. Relax at the top by the ReflectionPond and watch the waterfall pour into the ponds below. The home overlooks all, and featureslovingly-crafted details, two bedrooms and two baths. Outside is theVillage Green, throughwhichthe driveway continues towards the studio building and its surrounding piazza, field pond, andirrigated garden. The studio features an expansive workshop downstairs; the upstairs open planwas originally used forTai Chi, but is now amusical getaway.

    $2,050,0001293 Westside Road

    Frazer Elliott

    BOWEN ISLANDS TOP PRODUCING RE

    ALTOR SINCE 2009

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    info@bowenhomes.ca

  • 2 FRIDAY JULY 24 2015 WWW.BOWENISLANDUNDERCURRENT.COM

    C O M P L E T E F I R E B A NI N E F F E C T

    NO Open BurningNO Camp FiresNO Beach FiresNO FireworksNO BBQs

    TO REPORT FIRES OR WILDFIRESCALL 911

    WAT E R U S A G ER E C O M M E N D AT I O N S

    The following recommendations apply for all Municipal Water Systems:

    NO LAWN SPRINKLINGNO CAR/BOAT WASHINGNO DECK/POWER WASHING

    Please limit your water usage:

    Turn the tap off while brushing or washing Use the dishwasher only when full Use laundry machines sparingly Embrace the dusty look for your car Water garden by hand-held hose or containers Equip hoses with spring-loaded shutoff devices Collect rainwater Flush only when necessary

    If you have any questions or concerns, please contact the Public Worksdepartment at 604-947-4255

    A T T E N T I O NP R I V A T E W E L L n U S E R S

    Recently, Bowen Island Municipality has received reports of wells starting torun dry in the community. You can take steps to protect your water supplyand to deal with a dry well. Below are some suggestions for private well-users to avoid unpleasant surprises and have peace of mind:

    Check your water level, if you havent already Consider speaking to a qualified local water technician about installing a

    well depth monitor to notify you when your well reaches a lower-than-normal level

    Work with one of the local water companies or a group of neighbours tocoordinate tanker truck deliveries or create communal pump and stor-age systems

    Consider purchasing a storage tank that will work in coordination withthe natural recharge capacity of your well and will help to protect youfrom sudden water outages

    Remember that water quality and characteristics can be affected whenthe water table changes drastically, this may be a first indicator thatwater levels are low

    Talk to neighbours, especially if you are on a shared well or a sharedaquifer, to agree on water conservation strategies and share updates onthe level of the well

    Learn more tips about being Wellsmart at www.rdnwellsmart.ca orlook in the Bowen Phone Book under Water Systems and speak to aqualified local water technician

    Go to www.bimbc.ca for more information

    N O T I C E O FC O N S T R U C T I O NI N S N U G C O V E

    June 30 - July 31, 2015Installation of an oil-water separatorVisit www.bimbc.ca for more information andconstruction updates.

    R E Q U E S T F O RM E M B E R S O N T H E F E R R YA D V I S O R Y C O M M I T T E E

    The Bowen Island Municipal Transportation Advisory Committee (BIMTAC)is seeking members of the public interested in serving on the BC FerriesFerry Advisory Committee (FAC). The FAC is a sub-committee of BIMTAC thatacts as an advisory committee to BC Ferries to represent the interests ofBowen residents and to bring forward local ferry service issues and concernsidentified by residents of the community to BC Ferries.

    BIMTAC is particularly interested in receiving applications from students,seniors, commercial/economic interests and other community groups andorganizations.

    To view the Terms of Reference for BC Ferries Ferry Advisory Committeesplease go to www.bimbc.ca.

    Please submit your application by Monday, July 27 at 4:30 pm via email, faxor regular mail to:Hope Dallas, Committee Clerkhdallas@bimbc.ca604-947-4255Bowen Island Municipality981 Artisan Lane, Bowen Island, BC V0N 1G2

    C O N T R I B U T E T O AC R I M E n F R E E C O M M U N I T Y

    The Sea to Sky Crime Stoppers group is recruiting a volunteer representativefrom Bowen Island to serve on its board. The organization is a communityservice partnership between the RCMP, the media, and citizens to solvecrimes in the Sea to Sky corridor.

    Board meetings for the registered non-profit group are held every fiveweeks, usually in Squamish or Whistler. More information about CrimeStoppers is posted at www.solvecrime.ca and www.facebook.com/SeaToSkyCrimeStoppers.

    If you are interested in this opportunity, please contact Sea to Sky CrimeStoppers Board Secretary Jack Knight at jrknight63@gmail.com before July31.

    B O W E N B A YWAT E R S Y S T E M A N N U A LI N F O R M AT I O N M E E T I N G

    All Bowen Bay Residents Welcome!

    When: Thursday, July 30 at 5:30 pmWhere: Malkin Creek Road Cul-de-sac (weather dependent, alternatively

    Municipal Hall, 981 Artisan Lane)What: Overview of Annual Budget, Water Reports & Operations

  • WWW.BOWENISLANDUNDERCURRENT.COM FRIDAY JULY 24 2015 3

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