Boat review Stabicraft 2600 Supercab Boat review Stabicraft 2600 Supercab T he Stabicraft 2600 Supercab
Boat review Stabicraft 2600 Supercab Boat review Stabicraft 2600 Supercab T he Stabicraft 2600 Supercab
Boat review Stabicraft 2600 Supercab Boat review Stabicraft 2600 Supercab T he Stabicraft 2600 Supercab
Boat review Stabicraft 2600 Supercab Boat review Stabicraft 2600 Supercab T he Stabicraft 2600 Supercab
Boat review Stabicraft 2600 Supercab Boat review Stabicraft 2600 Supercab T he Stabicraft 2600 Supercab

Boat review Stabicraft 2600 Supercab Boat review Stabicraft 2600 Supercab T he Stabicraft 2600 Supercab

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  • Boat review Stabicraft 2600 Supercab

    T he Stabicraft 2600

    Supercab is the biggest in

    the company’s range to

    feature the Game Chaser

    transom and Arrow

    pontoons – and that makes

    it a weapon in offshore fishing.

    The new hull, pontoon and

    transom combo was introduced on

    the Stabicraft 1850 Supercab and

    now features on the 1650 and 2100

    models as well.

    The Arrow pontoons give the

    new boat a sleeker look with finer

    entry, deeper vee and narrower

    shoulders that sweep back to the

    Game Chaser transom. This allows

    the 2600 to back down as fast as you

    dare, with the transom piercing the

    water rather than pushing through

    it – normally a manoeuvre with the

    potential to ship plenty of water

    when a skipper goes hard astern

    chasing a hooked gamefish.

    The new 2600 Supercab is

    undoubtedly the softest-riding

    Stabicraft boats are becoming sleeker, shaking off their aesthetic challenges and presenting a more kindly shape to the seas as well as to the eye. Meet the latest evolution.

    Straight arrow

    Craig Lewis, Stabicraft dealer, took the new 2600 out in 40 knots

    76 Boating New Zealand August 2013

  • Stabicraft boats are becoming sleeker, shaking off their aesthetic challenges and presenting a more kindly shape to the seas as well as to the eye. Meet the latest evolution.

    Straight arrow Words by John Eichelsheim Photos by Will Calver

    and quietest Stabicraft I’ve had the

    pleasure to drive. Indeed, it’s better

    than the old 2570, which was quite

    similar in size and general layout.

    FinE hull The new hull design gives a fresh new

    look on the trailer and really shines

    once the boat’s in the water.

    For a Stabicraft, this is a deep-vee

    hull, measuring 21.5° at the transom,

    but it’s what has happened up front

    that makes the most difference to

    the ride. By reducing the size of the

    chine flats, especially at the boat’s

    shoulders, and tapering the pontoons

    – as well as altering Stabi’s typically

    full entry – Stabicraft has achieved an

    impressively soft, dry and quiet ride.

    We didn’t have a lot of sea to

    contend with, though it built with

    the nor’easter as the morning

    wore on. However Craig Lewis of

    Gulfland Marine, Whangaparaoa

    who supplied and commissioned the

    boat, has tried it in 40 knots of wind.

    Lewis commented on its excellent

    directional stability and the way it

    holds its line in the rough, assisted by

    the longer waterline length created by

    the Gamechaser transom.

    The trade-off from the Arrow

    pontoons is less stability at rest

    than we are used to with this brand,

    especially lightly loaded, which leaves

    the pontoons completely clear of

    the water, but it’s still good. The boat

    leans over only so far and then stops.

    The Game Chaser design

    provides superior backing-up

    ability, manoeuvrability and safety.

    It’s easy to steer the Game Chaser

    boats in reverse, making it a cinch to

    manoeuvre in a tight spot.

    We had around a metre of slop in

    Tiri Channel on the way home, but the

    2600 Supercab handled it smoothly

    and quietly. The boat tracks beautifully,

    including running downhill, and can

    be pushed along into a quartering sea

    without banging or jarring, not normally

    a Stabicraft’s best angle of attack.

    subscribe online at www.mags4gifts.co.nz/boating-nz 77subscribe online at www.mags4gifts.co.nz/boating-nz 77

  • Performance with the

    250hp Mercury Verado was

    characteristically crisp, though

    we didn’t explore its full potential

    because of the motor’s extreme

    newness. Travelling at 20 knots the

    boat feels positively languid, but

    even at 30 knots it is unflappable

    and sure-footed. This boat should

    be able to manage long passages in

    lumpy conditions without beating

    up its passengers.

    WEll SpEC’d The new model has an extensive list

    of standard features but the owner,

    for whom this is Stabicraft number

    two, has ticked several boxes on the

    manufacturer’s options list.

    He will keep the boat at his

    beachside property in the Bay of

    Islands on a tandem-axle Voyager

    steel trailer robust enough for beach

    launching. Weighing close to three

    tonnes all up, it’s equipped with an

    LEFT: Craig Lewis and John Eichelsheim enjoy the Stabicraft's spacious cockpit. ABOVE: Optional fishing accessories include tuna tubes.

    PERFORMANCE Furuno NavNet **Mercury SmartCraft VesselView

    RPM Speed (knots) Fuel (lph)** 1000 0.9 4.4 1500 2.2 6.0 2000 4.4 11.0 2500 8.0 16.0 3000 14.0 25.0 3500 19.4 32.0 4000 22.6 41.0 4500 27.0 54.0 5000 29.0 75.0 5500 31.5 99.2 6000 35.0 110.2

    78 Boating New Zealand August 2013

    0813223

  • electrically activated Sensabrake

    system for road use.

    This model introduces a few

    changes to equipment: aluminium

    rodholders – previously plastic, cast

    aluminium cleats and beefy 50mm

    diameter matte-black painted bow

    rails. Stabicraft has incorporated

    subtle evolutionary changes

    and features like the bait station

    rodholders and the generous use of

    non-slip neoprene on the side decks,

    foredeck, coamings, rear corner seats

    and cabin between the v-berths.

    The general standard of finish

    is good, but Stabicraft hasn’t gone

    overboard with this boat, making

    sure it’s practical and serviceable as

    a fishing/diving day boat. Facilities

    include an under-bunk plumbed

    electric toilet forward of the helm

    console with an environmentally-

    friendly 28-litre holding tank.

    On review day the v-berths were

    still covered in plastic wrap. Lewis

    says they’re likely to stay that way: the

    owner’s previous boat, which Lewis

    also supplied, was traded after three

    years' hard use with the squabs still

    encased in protective plastic film. The

    owner does little overnighting and

    the forward cabin is more likely to be

    used to store gear than for sleeping.

    There is generous storage with

    shelves, cubby holes and bins for odds

    and ends. There’s a large locker under

    The Arrow pontoons present a sleeker silhouette, and the Game Chaser transom presents a sharper tail end for backing up on a fish, than on earlier Stabicraft models

    subscribe online at www.mags4gifts.co.nz/boating-nz 79

    0813224

  • the floor between the v-berths and

    a massive 450-litre underfloor wet

    locker with waste pump in the cockpit.

    largE hardtop The wheelhouse is a generous size

    with ample headroom, but Stabicraft

    has made no attempt to squeeze in

    a galley or extra seating. The same

    boat is available with an extended

    Supercab suitable for overnighting

    that offers these features.

    Inside, seating while underway is

    restricted to a pair of optional Soft

    Rider gas-strut pedestal seats, both

    with fold-up bolsters for lumbar

    support when standing up. Footrests

    and grab rails are well positioned,

    whether standing up to drive or

    sitting down. Standing passengers

    are also provided with grab rails

    overhead and along the dashboard.

    The boat’s owner has opted for the

    enclosed hardtop with dual sliding

    doors: solid-looking black powder-

    coated aluminium and glass affairs.

    A two-tier helm console is plain,

    black powder-coated aluminium – no

    fancy vinyl, timber or carbon – but

    it offers plenty of real estate for

    large screen displays. A 14-inch

    Furuno NavNet touch-screen

    display still left plenty of room for

    the Mercury SmartCraft VesselView

    display, Furuno NavPilot and an

    array of switches and controls.

    Communications and stereo

    equipment is housed overhead and

    tempered glass windscreens feature

    a washer and wiper for each pane.

    The forward cabin and the

    wheelhouse are lined in grey Verticell

    fabric, which complements the

    boat’s black and white paint scheme

    and chequerplate alloy cockpit and

    hardtop floors. The forward hatch

    provides access to the ground tackle,

    a substantial Delta plough anchor

    attached to 10m of chain and 100m

    of warp stored on a StressFree drum

    winch under the foredeck, though

    it’s easy enough to sidle around the

    hardtop to the foredeck if you prefer.

    Outside roof rails provide secure

    handholds and something to strap

    an inflatable dinghy onto; the roof

    is engineered to support the weight

    of a person and can accept a tuna

    tower if desired.

    FiShing CoCkpit A big, wide-open cockpit with

    high sides and full-length side-

    pockets means the 2600 is a pro