Blackpool Explorer Scouts. Module J – Awards and Badges

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Blackpool Explorer Scouts Slide 2 Module J Awards and Badges Slide 3 Module J Objectives To be able to explain how the awards and badges form a progressive scheme from age 6 to 25. To be able to explain the concept of the Chief Scouts Awards To understand and show how Participation Awards can be used to recognise participation in the programme. To know, and be able to explain how Moving-on Awards improve links between sections. To understand and talk about the purpose and use of activity badges and the partnership awards. To assess awards and badges on the basis of personal best. Slide 4 What makes a programme? Need a reminder? Slide 5 Explorer Scout Badges Group Awards Explorer Belt National Recognised Awards Staged Activity Badges Activity Badges Progressive Awards Duke of Edinburgh Slide 6 Participation Awards (known as Joining in Badges in younger Sections) Shows how many years you have been in Scouting (6 18 year age range) What do you think a young person should have to do to receive these badges? Attend half of meetings? Be at absolutely everything? Personal best? Slide 7 Challenge Badges Chief Scouts Bronze (Beavers) Silver (Cubs) Gold (Scouts) How would you cover off elements of your sections Outdoor Challenge? Look at the badge requirements and provide feedback. Challenge Badges and Chief Scouts Award Beavers 6x Cubs 7x Scouts 9x Slide 8 Air Activities 1.Make a paper dart out of paper and see how well it flies 2.Find out about a particular aeroplane and tell others in the colony about it. Examples might be Concord, Spitfire, Airbus, Lynx helicopter etc 3.Talk to someone who has flown in a plane, helicopter or hot air balloon and find out what it was like 4.If they have already flown in a plane - tell others in the Colony what it was like. If not, tell them what they would like to fly in, and why Slide 9 Air Activities 1.Know the dangers involved in visiting an airfield. 2.Visit an airfield, air display or air museum. 3.Choose three of the following: Make and fly one of the following: a model aeroplane, three different types of paper glider, a hot-air balloon, or a kite Identify six airlines from their markings Name and identify the main parts of an aeroplane Assemble a plastic scale model aeroplane to a reasonable standard Name and identify the different types of aircraft (powered aeroplanes, airships, gliders etc.) Fly in an aircraft and share their experience with the Pack Explain how different weather conditions can affect air activities Collect and identify six different pictures of aircraft and share them with other Cub Scouts Slide 10 Air Activities 1.Know the Rules relating to access to airfields in Policy, Organisation and Rules. Draw a diagram/map or make a model of an airfield to show and name the different areas. 2.Understand the terms: nose, fuselage, tail, main-plane, port and starboard. Know the names of the control surfaces of an aircraft. 3.Construct and fly a chuck glider for at least 5 seconds or build and fly a hot-air balloon or kite. 4.Choose one of the following activities: 5.Collect photographs or pictures of six aircraft that interest you, name them and their operational uses. 6.Discuss an airline that you are interested in, or have travelled on, showing pictures of aircraft livery and logos. 7.Take part in a Patrol or Troop visit with other Scouts to a place of aviation interest. 8.From the list of Aviation Skills - training activities complete four items, each to be taken from a different section. Slide 11 Air Activities Alternative A - paragliding 1.Know the rules relating to access to airfields as laid down in Policy, Organisation and Rules. 2.Understand and discuss the factors involved in selecting the launch point on the field and demonstrate this to the assessor. 3.Successfully complete the British Hand-gliding and Paragliding Association's Paragliding Ground Training, including landing rolls and inflation and collapse of canopy by wing-tip holders and paragliders. 4.Carry out the British Hand-gliding and Paragliding Association's Course of Training in controlled descents and self-released flights up to the standard of 360-degree stable turns. 5.Carry out canopy control practice on the ground and have a basic knowledge of the flight and steering principles of the canopy. 6.Understand and perform the duties of wing-tip holder, lookout and tensiometer reader, and understand the function of the launch marshal. 7.Discuss the care, packing and storage of equipment. Alternative B - gliding 1.Know the rules relating to access to airfields as laid down in Policy, Organisation and Rules. 2.Understand and discuss the safety aspects of gliding. 3.Act as a member of a Ground Crew and take part in the launch and retrieval of a glider. 4.Demonstrate the signals for a glider launch and transmit them to a winch operator or towing party. 5.List the forces acting on a glider and explain how soaring flight is obtained (thermals, wave lift and ridge lift). 6.Take part in a Gliding Course. The aim should be to gain at least 5 hours flying time, and 10 launches over a period. Alternative C - parachuting 1.Understanding the safety aspects of parachuting. 2.Understand the operation of a parachute. 3.Understand and demonstrate landing procedures. 4.Take part in 3 parachute jumps from an aircraft. Slide 12 So what to think about when awarding a badge Has that young person tried their best Is the standard the same for all Scouts? Encourage them to progress this skill throughout their Scouting life Slide 13 Partnership Awards Three Awards Joint activities between two or more Sections or an appropriate external organisation Looking at the badge requirements, what ideas do you have in order for your section to gain one of the above badges? Slide 14 Membership and Moving-On Awards Membership Badge - presented when you have taken your promise and become a Member of The Scout Association Moving-On Award - presented when you successfully move from one Section to the next. By working in groups with YLs from other sections than your own, what joint sectional activities could you run that would count towards the requirements of the moving on award? Slide 15 Module J Objectives Have we achieved them? To be able to explain how the awards and badges form a progressive scheme from age 6 to 25. To be able to explain the concept of the Chief Scouts Awards To understand and show how Participation Awards can be used to recognise participation in the programme. To know, and be able to explain how Moving-on Awards improve links between sections. To understand and talk about the purpose and use of activity badges and the partnership awards. To assess awards and badges on the basis of personal best. Slide 16 Now I know you werent bored you came back!!! Thats it Your Done

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