Click here to load reader

BIAWAK - · PDF fileBIAWAK Journal of Varanid Biology and Husbandry Editor ... [email protected] Editorial Review MICHAEL J. BALSAI Department of Biology, Temple University

  • View
    231

  • Download
    5

Embed Size (px)

Text of BIAWAK - · PDF fileBIAWAK Journal of Varanid Biology and Husbandry Editor ......

  • Journal of Varanid Biology and Husbandry

    ISSN: 1936-296X

    Volume 7 Number 2

    BIAWAK

  • On the Cover: Varanus bengalensis

    The illustration appearing on the cover of this issue depicts Varanus bengalensis, and originates from Plate 101 (Tab. CI) of Albertus Sebas monumental 1734 work entitled, Locupletissimi Rerum Naturalium Thesauri. Identified by Seba as Lacerta, this early account and illustration of V. bengalensis predates Linnaeus 1735 Systema Naturae, which introduced the concept of binomial zoological nomenclature. Moreover, this work also predates the first ap-plication of Varanus Merrem 1820 to varanid lizards by more than eighty years.

    Sebas Locupletissimi Rerum Naturalium Thesauri remains an important and highly sought after illustrated work, particularly due to its large emphasis on herpetological natural history. Several additional illustrations depicting va-ranid specimens from Sebas personal collection appear throughout the work, including V. salvator and V. niloticus.

    References

    Linn, C.v. 1735. Caroli Linnaei, Sveci, Doctoris Medicinae, Systema Naturae, Sive Regna Tria Naturae System atice Proposita per Classes, Ordines, Genera, & Species. Theodorum Haak, Lugduni Batavorum.Merrem, B. 1820. Versuch eines Systems der Amphibien - Tentamen systematis amphibiorum. Johann Christian Krieger, Marburg.Seba, A. 1734. Locupletissimi Rerum Naturalium Thesauri Accurata Descriptio, et Iconibus Artificiosissimis Expressio, Per Universam Physices Historiam. J. Wetstenium & Gul. Smith, & Janssonio-Waesbergios, Amsterdam.

  • BIAWAKJournal of Varanid Biology and Husbandry

    Editor

    ROBERT W. MENDYKCenter for Science Teaching and Learning

    1 Tanglewood RoadRockville Centre, NY 11570, US

    [email protected]

    Associate Editors

    DANIEL BENNETTPinaglubayan, Butaan Project

    Polillo Island, Quezon, [email protected]

    MIchAEL cOTAFaculty of Science and Technology

    Suan Sunandha Rajabhat University1 U-thong Road, Dusit District,

    Bangkok 10300 [email protected]

    Natural History MuseumNational Science Museum, Thailand

    Technopolis, Khlong 5, Khlong LuangPathum Thani 12120, [email protected]

    ANDR KOch Zoologisches Forschungsmuseum Alexander Koenig

    Leibniz Institute for Animal Biodiversity Adenauerallee 160 D-53113 Bonn, DE

    [email protected]

    Editorial Review

    MIchAEL J. BALsAIDepartment of Biology, Temple University

    Philadelphia, PA 19122, [email protected]

    BERND EIDENMLLERGriesheimer Ufer 5365933 Frankfurt, DE

    [email protected]

    MIchAEL FOsTDepartment of Math and Statistics

    Georgia State UniversityAtlanta, GA 30303, US

    [email protected]udent.gsu.edu

    RusTON W. hARTDEgENDepartment of Herpetology, Dallas Zoo

    650 South R.L. Thornton FreewayDallas, Texas 75203, US

    [email protected]

    hANs-gEORg hORNMonitor Lizards Research Station

    Hasslinghauser Str. 51D-45549 Sprockhvel, [email protected]

    TIM JEssOp Department of ZoologyUniversity of Melbourne

    Parkville, Victoria 3010, [email protected]

    JEFFREY M. LEMMBehavioral Ecology Division

    San Diego Zoo Institute for Conservation ResearchZoological Society of San Diego

    15600 San Pasqual Valley RdEscondido, CA 92027, [email protected]

    InternAtIonAl VArAnId Interest Groupwww.varanidae.org

    The International Varanid Interest group is a volunteer-based organization established to advance varanid research, conservation, and hus-bandry, and to promote scientific literacy among varanid enthusiasts. Membership to the IVIG is free, and open to anyone with an interest in monitor lizards and the advancement of varanid research. Membership includes subscription to Biawak, an international research journal of varanid biology and husbandry, and is available online through the IVIG website.

    Editorial Liaisons

    JOhN ADRAgNACybersalvator.com

    [email protected]

    MATThEW sOMMAhttp://indicus-complex.webs.com

    [email protected]

  • BiawakVolume 7 Number 2

    December 2013

    ISSN 1936-296X

    News Notes............................................................................................................................................. 50

    Shelter from the Storm: an Unconventional Refuge for a wild Varanus varius (white, 1790) (Reptilia: Sauria: Varanidae)

    ........................................................................................aLaN a. JONES & DEaN C. METCaLFE 54

    Husbandry and Breeding of the Crocodile Monitor Varanus salvadorii Peters & Doria, 1878 in Captivity

    .........................................................aLVaRO CaMiNa, NiCOLaS SaLiNaS & JaiRO CUEVaS 56

    Notes and Observations on the Fish Prey of Varanus salvator macromaculatus (Reptilia: Squamata: Varanidae)in Thailand with a Review of the Fish Prey of the Varanus salvator Complex known to Date

    ......................................................................................MiCHaEL COTa & RaLF SOMMERLaD 63

    Historical Facsimiles.............................................................................................................................. 71 Recent Publications................................................................................................................................ 80illustrations............................................................................................................................................ 82

    2013 international Varanid interest Group

    Journal of Varanid Biology and Husbandry

    Varanus salvator macro-maculatus eating a turtle egg. Japanese Gardens, Sin-gapore. Photographed by Ken Goh.

  • NEWS NOTES

    50

    641 Monitor Lizards Captured in Thailand

    A total of 641 Asian water monitors (Varanus salvator macromaculatus) were captured in Samut Songkhrams Amphawa District, Thailand by officers of the Department of National Parks, Wildlife and Plant Conservation due to complaints by villagers. Local villagers claim that the lizards had been raiding numerous fishery farms. The lizards are to be released in the Khaoson Wildlife Breeding Centre in Ratchaburis Chom Bung District.

    Source: Bangkok Post, 10 July 2013.

    Charges Filed for Monitor Lizard Poachers in India

    Forest Department Officials in Chandrapur, India filed charges against six individuals, including five police officers in a case of monitor lizard poaching (species not identified, but likely Varanus bengalensis). The men are accused of delivering 2 kg of monitor lizard meat to a local restaurant.

    Source: The Times of India, 6 July 2013

    Two Arrested with Golden Monitor Lizard

    The Central Investigation Bureau of the Nepal Police arrested two wildlife traders that were in possession of a golden monitor lizard (Varanus flavescens) in Kathmandu, Nepal. The suspects were caught by police as they attempted to sell the live animal to a potential customer. It was later determined that the animal was captured in Taplejung before it was brought to Kathmandu for sale. Varanus flavescens is protected in Nepal under Annex 1 of the National Parks and Wildlife Conservation Act of 1973, and the illegal trade in the protected species brings a steep fine and a jail sentence of 5 to 15 years.

    Source: The Himalayan, 26 July 2013

    New Monitor Lizard Exhibit to Open at the Bronx Zoo

    Exhibit artists at the Wildlife Conservation Societys Bronx Zoo (USA) are putting the finishing touches on a brand new exhibit which will display several species of monitor lizard including Varanus komodoensis, V. macraei, V. mertensi, and V. acanthurus. This will be the zoos first time displaying V. komodoensis since the 1950s.

    Source: The New York Times, 15 July 2013.Varanus tristis. Ayers Rock, Northern Territory. Photo-graphed by Dean Lee.

  • BIAWAK VOL. 7 NO. 251

    Komodo Dragon Population Around Pota in Decline

    The population of Komodo dragons (Varanus komodoensis) in the vicinity of Watu Payung Lake, Pota, Flores is in decline due to the effects of poaching. Local residents have taken to trapping the animals which they blame for attacks on their livestock. The population has only been known to the outside world since 2011 and as the region does not constitute part of Komodo Park, authorities consider their conservation status to be of high concern. Local villagers professed that they were unaware the large lizards were the same as the parks namesake species. Source: Jakarta Post, 29 June 2013

    Television Star Pleads Guilty to Sale of Protected Monitors

    Donald Schultz, a self-described reptile expert and television personality on the Animal Planet series Wild Recon, has pled guilty to charges connected to the sale of two Iranian desert monitors (Varanus griseus). The

    animals, along with a number of other reptiles, were listed for sale on Schultzs Facebook account. An undercover agent with the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service contacted Schultz claiming to be purchasing the animals for a third party. A sale was eventually completed and the pair shipped to another agent in New York in 2010. The sale of the endangered desert monitors, protected under Appendix I of CITES was in violation of the Endangered Species Act, and can bring up to one year in prison and a $100,000 fine. Source: Los Angeles Times, 13 September 2013; 19 November 2013

    Losses for Zoo Komodo Dragons

    Komodo dragons (Varanus komodoensis) at two U.S. facilities have recently died. A 20 year-old male Komodo dragon was euthanized at Zoo Atlanta. A zoo spokespe