1
778 rheumatism of a nervous character are chorea, hysteria, con- traction of the extremities, tetanus, insanity, &c." The best chapter in the book is that devoted to a consideration of the various theories that have been started to account for the nature of the disease. The style is good and the arrange- ment clear, but a good deal more work must be expended on it to make it rank as a first-rate treatise on the subject. Patholo,qy and Treatment of Nerve Weakness. By C. L. DANA,M.D. New York : Trow’s Co. 1883.-Thereismuch more of treatment than of pathology in this little lecture, which was read at a meeting of the Practitioners’ Society of New York in May, 1883. A view of the pathology of neur- asthenia is propounded which is in accord with the teachings of a yet unformed molecular physiology. The number of means here given for disestablishing the neurasthenic state of molecular instability is certainly large enough : General prin- ciples ; hygienic; internal medication in the way of seda- tives, tonics, stimulants; surgical measures; electricit,v; hydrotherapy; revulsives and inhibitants; dry cups; massage (Weir-Mitchell treatment); special diet; andmentalthera- peutics. Cholera a Disease of the Nervous System. By JOHN CHAPMAN, M.D. London : J. and A. Churchill. 1883.- This brochure is a sort of réchauffé of Dr. Chapman’s work on Diarrbaea and Cholera, published in a second edition in 1866. It contains a letter in English addressed to the editor of the Journal de Medeeine de Paris by the author, a French version of which was published by that journal in August last. The second part of the pamphlet gives in full the review of the work on Diarrhoea and Cholera, the writer of which appears to have been Sir Andrew Clark, Bart. It is sufficient for us to say that Dr. Chapman believes that all the phenomena of cholera are due to hyperaemia of the spinal cord and sympathetic nervous systems, and that the most emsacious remedy for the symptom3 of the algide stage of cholera is the spinal ice-bag. The American Joacrnal of Neurology and Psychiatry. August, 1883. New York: B. Westerman and Co.-This well-printed quarterly journal deserves to meet with success. The third number now before us contains a variety of material, some being of considerable interest and value. Of this description we may mention Dr. Hoffmann’s article on Researches in the Normal and Pathological Anatomy of the Grey Substance of the Brain, with remarks on Methods of Examination; A Provisional Communication regarding a case of Pons Haemorrhage, with Descending Degeneration of the Stratum Intermedium," by Spitzka, one of the editors. The other original articles are:-Variola and Insanity, by Dr. Kiernan; On the Alleged Relation between the Speech Disturbance and the Tendon Reflex in Paretic Dementia, by Spitzka ; Simulation of Insanity by a Criminal Lunatic, by Blathardt; The Somatic Etiology of Crime, by Henry Howard ; Alcoholic Insanity, by Lewis Mason; Report on the Recent Appearances observed Post mortem in a Case of Delirium Grave, by Clevenger ; On the Brain of a Cat lacking the Callosum, by Burt Wilder ; The Case of Diedrich Mahnken, by Landon Gray; A Case of Verbal Blindness with Right Lateral Hemianopsia, by McBride ; and on an Authentic Case of Disappearance of the Tendon Reflex without ascertainable Pathological Basis, by Spitzka. This last article relates the case of a doctor who had been in the habit of producing the knee-jerk on himself from his youth upwards. During the last seven years the knee phenomenon could not be got on either side. We should be cautious in drawing any rigid inference from such facts. The disappearance may be due to local conditions, or is it too much to suppose that some other phenomena more explicit in their significance may yet appear in the course of time ? The journal further contains a most refreshing review of Types of Insanity, by Allan McLane Hamilton. New Inventions. BED TABLE. THE table, a woodcut of which is annexed, can be adjusted to the frame of any ordinary hospital or infirmary bed or cot, the steel legs giving considerable play. It is useful not only for the purposes of eating, reading, writing, or work, but it is found to have its advantages for many invalids who suffer from dyspnoea, and who breathe most easily in a sitting 0 posture with the elbows supported. It is manufactured and sold by Messrs. Mayer and Meltzer of Great Portland-street, and the simple method by which it is fixed to the iron frame- work of the bed is due to the ingenuity of Mr. N. H. Nixon, the secretary of University College Hospital, whose thought- fulneas for the comfort of hospital patients is worthy of all commendation. "MEDICAL BULLETINS." l’o the -Ldttor of ’1’HE LANCET. SIR,-I thank "A. R. G." for his communication, but his reference to the late Archbishop of Canterbury is unfor. tunate for him. No medical bulletin was ever issued during the last illness of the Archbishop. The medical attendants upon his Grace never signed a single bulletin or communicated a single written observation upon the case to the daily journals. They studiously avoided doing so. All the communications which were published were made by members of the family in answer to inquiries, which were incessant from all parts of the kingdom, from the Queen down to the smallest parish in the diocese of Canterbury. The medical attendants were not responsible for this demand for information upon the part of the public. When their names were published in the notices regarding the Archbishop’s illness, such publication was made without their action in the matter. Any attempt at secrecy would only be injurious to those most interested, and lead to misrepresentation. When therefore you, Sir, and other medical editors asked, for in- formation upon the medical aspect of the case, that information was supplied to you with the consent of his Grace’s family. If that information was republished in non-medical journals, the medical attendants are in no way responsible for it. I disapprove of misleading or dubious statements, which are capable of being twisted in various ways, especially reo garding those whose lives are public property, and when "A. R. G." has the privilege of being in medical attendance upon those who are occupying a high position in the world, be will soon find that the army of reporters who are catering for the daily papers will not allow him to make secret visits to illustrious individuals who happen to be seriously indis- posed, but will publish the fact of that visit whether he will or no. Yours truly, ALFRED CARPENTER. ALFRED CARPENTER. Grosvenor-street, and Duppas House, Croydon, Oct. 1883.

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778

rheumatism of a nervous character are chorea, hysteria, con-traction of the extremities, tetanus, insanity, &c." Thebest chapter in the book is that devoted to a consideration ofthe various theories that have been started to account for thenature of the disease. The style is good and the arrange-ment clear, but a good deal more work must be expended onit to make it rank as a first-rate treatise on the subject.

Patholo,qy and Treatment of Nerve Weakness. By C. L.DANA,M.D. New York : Trow’s Co. 1883.-Thereismuchmore of treatment than of pathology in this little lecture,which was read at a meeting of the Practitioners’ Society ofNew York in May, 1883. A view of the pathology of neur-asthenia is propounded which is in accord with the teachingsof a yet unformed molecular physiology. The number ofmeans here given for disestablishing the neurasthenic state ofmolecular instability is certainly large enough : General prin-ciples ; hygienic; internal medication in the way of seda-tives, tonics, stimulants; surgical measures; electricit,v;hydrotherapy; revulsives and inhibitants; dry cups; massage(Weir-Mitchell treatment); special diet; andmentalthera-peutics.

Cholera a Disease of the Nervous System. By JOHNCHAPMAN, M.D. London : J. and A. Churchill. 1883.-This brochure is a sort of réchauffé of Dr. Chapman’s workon Diarrbaea and Cholera, published in a second edition in1866. It contains a letter in English addressed to the editorof the Journal de Medeeine de Paris by the author, a Frenchversion of which was published by that journal in Augustlast. The second part of the pamphlet gives in full thereview of the work on Diarrhoea and Cholera, the writer ofwhich appears to have been Sir Andrew Clark, Bart. It issufficient for us to say that Dr. Chapman believes that allthe phenomena of cholera are due to hyperaemia of the spinalcord and sympathetic nervous systems, and that the mostemsacious remedy for the symptom3 of the algide stage ofcholera is the spinal ice-bag.The American Joacrnal of Neurology and Psychiatry.

August, 1883. New York: B. Westerman and Co.-This

well-printed quarterly journal deserves to meet with success.The third number now before us contains a variety of

material, some being of considerable interest and value. Ofthis description we may mention Dr. Hoffmann’s article onResearches in the Normal and Pathological Anatomy of theGrey Substance of the Brain, with remarks on Methods ofExamination; A Provisional Communication regarding acase of Pons Haemorrhage, with Descending Degenerationof the Stratum Intermedium," by Spitzka, one of theeditors. The other original articles are:-Variola and

Insanity, by Dr. Kiernan; On the Alleged Relation betweenthe Speech Disturbance and the Tendon Reflex in PareticDementia, by Spitzka ; Simulation of Insanity by a CriminalLunatic, by Blathardt; The Somatic Etiology of Crime, byHenry Howard ; Alcoholic Insanity, by Lewis Mason;Report on the Recent Appearances observed Post mortem ina Case of Delirium Grave, by Clevenger ; On the Brain of aCat lacking the Callosum, by Burt Wilder ; The Case ofDiedrich Mahnken, by Landon Gray; A Case of VerbalBlindness with Right Lateral Hemianopsia, by McBride ;and on an Authentic Case of Disappearance of the TendonReflex without ascertainable Pathological Basis, by Spitzka.This last article relates the case of a doctor who had been inthe habit of producing the knee-jerk on himself from hisyouth upwards. During the last seven years the knee

phenomenon could not be got on either side. We should becautious in drawing any rigid inference from such facts.The disappearance may be due to local conditions, or is ittoo much to suppose that some other phenomena moreexplicit in their significance may yet appear in the courseof time ? The journal further contains a most refreshingreview of Types of Insanity, by Allan McLane Hamilton.

New Inventions.BED TABLE.

THE table, a woodcut of which is annexed, can be adjustedto the frame of any ordinary hospital or infirmary bed or cot,the steel legs giving considerable play. It is useful not onlyfor the purposes of eating, reading, writing, or work, but it isfound to have its advantages for many invalids who sufferfrom dyspnoea, and who breathe most easily in a sitting 0

posture with the elbows supported. It is manufactured andsold by Messrs. Mayer and Meltzer of Great Portland-street,and the simple method by which it is fixed to the iron frame-work of the bed is due to the ingenuity of Mr. N. H. Nixon,the secretary of University College Hospital, whose thought-fulneas for the comfort of hospital patients is worthy of allcommendation.

"MEDICAL BULLETINS."l’o the -Ldttor of ’1’HE LANCET.

SIR,-I thank "A. R. G." for his communication, buthis reference to the late Archbishop of Canterbury is unfor.tunate for him. No medical bulletin was ever issuedduring the last illness of the Archbishop. The medicalattendants upon his Grace never signed a single bulletinor communicated a single written observation upon thecase to the daily journals. They studiously avoided doingso. All the communications which were published weremade by members of the family in answer to inquiries,which were incessant from all parts of the kingdom, fromthe Queen down to the smallest parish in the diocese ofCanterbury. The medical attendants were not responsiblefor this demand for information upon the part of the public.When their names were published in the notices regardingthe Archbishop’s illness, such publication was made withouttheir action in the matter.Any attempt at secrecy would only be injurious to those

most interested, and lead to misrepresentation. Whentherefore you, Sir, and other medical editors asked, for in-formation upon the medical aspect of the case, that informationwas supplied to you with the consent of his Grace’s family.If that information was republished in non-medical journals,the medical attendants are in no way responsible for it.

I disapprove of misleading or dubious statements, whichare capable of being twisted in various ways, especially reogarding those whose lives are public property, and when"A. R. G." has the privilege of being in medical attendanceupon those who are occupying a high position in the world,be will soon find that the army of reporters who are cateringfor the daily papers will not allow him to make secret visitsto illustrious individuals who happen to be seriously indis-posed, but will publish the fact of that visit whether he willor no. Yours truly, ALFRED CARPENTER.ALFRED CARPENTER.Grosvenor-street, and Duppas House, Croydon, Oct. 1883.