Baroque Italy and Spain

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Baroque Italy and Spain

Text of Baroque Italy and Spain

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    Religious movement is much of the Baroque art in Catholic countries

    associated:

    The Counter-Reformation.

    List three adjectives or phrases that describe its style:

    Dramatic theatricality.

    Grandiose scale.

    Elaborate ornateness.

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    Carlo Maderno

    Santa Susana

    Rome, Italy

    1597-1603

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    Giacomo della Porta

    faade of I l Ges

    Rome, Italy

    ca. 1575-1584

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    Giacomo della Porta

    faade o f Il GesRome, Italyca. 1575-1584

    Three ways in which Maderns Early Baroque church of Santa Susanna resembles the

    church of Il Gesu:Each building has scroll buttresses connecting the upper and lower levels of the faade.

    Each building has two pediments, one for each story.

    Sculptures in niches frame the central doorway in each building.

    Carlo Maderno

    Santa SusanaRome, Italy1597-1603

    Three ways in which Maderns Early Baroque church of Santa Susanna

    differs from the church of Il Gesu:The faade has a greater verticality, concentrating and dramatizing the major

    features of its model.

    The faades tall central section projects forward from the horizontal lower story.

    Strong shadows cast by the vigorously projecting columns and pilasters mount

    dramatically toward the emphatically stressed central axis.

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    Carlo Maderno

    Santa Susana

    Rome, Italy

    1597-1603

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    Four architects who worked on St. Peter's and note the primary

    contribution of each.Donato dAngelo Bramante: The original plan and the concept of a

    hemispherical dome.

    Michelangelo: The reduced plan and the ogival dome with drum.Carlo Maderno: the faade.

    Gianlorenzo Bernini: the colonnaded piazza.

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    Carlo Maderno

    Aerial view of Saint Peters

    Vatican City, Rome, Italy

    1506-1666

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    Gianlorenzo Bernini

    baldacchino Saint Peters

    Vatican City, Rome, Italy

    1624-33

    gilded bronze

    approximately 100 ft. high

    Baldacchino

    Canopy-like structure on

    columns, frequently built

    over an altar.

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    Gianlorenzo Bernini

    Scala Regia

    Vatican City, Rome, Italy

    1663-1666

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    Gianlorenzo Bernini

    David

    1623

    marble

    approximately 5 ft. 7 in. high

    Four major characteristics of

    Bernini's sculpture that are typical

    of Baroque art in general.

    Expansive and theatrical.

    The element of time usually plays an

    important role.

    Dynamic quality conveying a bursting

    forth of energy.

    Refusal to limit itself to firmly defined

    spatial settings.

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    Gianlorenzo Bernini

    David

    1623

    marble

    approximately 5 ft. 7 in. high

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    BerniniMichelangelo

    Buonarroti

    Donatello

    Michelangelo's is shown before, Bernini's is during and Donatello's is after the fight

    with Goliath.Michelangelo and Bernini depict David as more of a man, Donatello shows him as a young

    boy, also lots of sexual symbolism in Donatello's, like the feather from Goliath's hat

    running up David's inner thigh.

    Donatello's is bronze, the other 2 are marble.Donatello's is very early Renaissance- he is going towards more realistic features, as is seen

    in the pouchy stomach and saggy behind of David.

    Michelangelo's musculature is consistent with the thoughts of the Renaissance: a look

    back at idealized figures and tension-creating scenes- he hasn't fought yet, we still don't

    know what will happen.

    Bernini is working in a more baroque style, combing motion and concentration (in

    David's face) to achieve a dynamism in the work not found in the earlier

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    Gianlorenzo Bernini

    in teri or of the Cornaro Chapel

    Santa Maria della Vittoria, Rome, Italy

    1645-1652

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    Gianlorenzo BerniniEcstasy of Saint Theresa

    Cornaro Chapel,

    Santa Maria della Vittoria, Rome, Italy

    1645-1652

    Bernini depiction of the vision

    of St. Theresa:

    As light (shining from behind

    a hidden window of yellowglass) pouring down on

    bronze rays suggesting the

    radiance of Heaven.

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    Francesco Borromini

    faade of

    San Carlo al le Quattro Fontane

    Rome, Italy1665-1676

    Who developed the

    sculpturalarchitectural

    style to its extreme?

    Francesco Borromoni.

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    Francesco Borrominifaade of

    San Carlo al le Quattro Fontane

    Rome, Italy

    1665-1676

    Two buildings designed by him.San Carlo alle Quattro Fontane.

    Chapel of Saint Ivo.

    Both are located in the city of Rome.

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    Francesco Borromini

    plan of

    San Carlo al le Quattro Fontane

    Rome, Italy1665-1676

    While the circle had been the ideal

    geometric figure to Renaissance

    architects, Baroque planners

    preferred the oval.

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    Francesco Borrominidome of

    San Carlo al le Quattro Fontane

    Rome, Italy

    1665-1676

    They preferred the oval

    because the oval is a more

    dynamic form of the circle,

    creating an interior that appearsto flow from entrance to altar,

    unimpeded by the segmentation

    characteristic of Renaissance

    buildings.

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    Francesco BorrominiChapel of Saint I vo

    Col lege of the Sapienza

    Rome, Italy

    begun 1642

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    Francesco Borrominiplan of the Chapel of Saint I vo

    Col lege of the Sapienza

    Rome, Italy

    begun 1642

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    Francesco Borrominidome of the Chapel of Saint I vo

    Col lege of the Sapienza

    Rome, Italy

    begun 1642

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    Francesco Borrominidome of the Chapel of Saint I vo

    Col lege of the Sapienza

    Rome, Italy

    begun 1642

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    Guarino Guarini

    Palazzo Carignano

    Turin, Italy

    1679-1692

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    Guarino Guarini

    Palazzo Carignano

    Turin, Italy

    1679-1692

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    Guarino Guarini

    Chapel of Santi ssima Sindone

    Turin, Italy

    1667-1694

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    Guarino Guarini

    Chapel of Santi ssima Sindone

    Turin, Italy

    1667-1694

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    Bramante and Raphael

    Dome of Sant Eligio degli Orefici

    Rome, Italy

    ca. 1509, reconstructed ca. 1600

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    Caravaggio

    Conversion of Saint Paul

    Cerasi Chapel, Santa Maria del Popolo

    Rome, Italyca. 1601

    oil on canvas

    approximately 7 ft. 6 in. x 5 ft. 9 in.

    Three characteristics of

    Caravaggio's style.

    Injected naturalism into both

    religious and classical subjectswith unidealized figures.

    Sharply, dramatically lit figures

    emerging from a dark

    background.

    Invites the viewer to participate

    in the scene.

    The common purpose of Caravaggio's Conversion o f St Paul and

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    CaravaggioConversion of Saint Paul

    Gianlorenzo BerniniEcstasy of Saint Theresa

    The common purpose of Caravaggio s Conversion o f St. Paul and

    Bernini's The Ecstasy o f St. Theresa:To produce the representation of a vision, using actual light from each chapels

    windows.

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    Caravaggio

    Calli ng of Saint Matthew

    Contarelli Chapel, San Luigi dei Francesci

    Rome, Italy

    ca. 1597-1601

    oil on canvas

    11 ft. 1 in. x 11 ft. 5 in.

    Caravaggio attempted to

    compel the viewers interest

    and involvement in the

    scenein his religious

    pictures.

    Caravaggio

    accomplished this

    by using pictorialdevices such as

    showing action

    taking place in the

    foreground; low

    horizon line;dramatic light.

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    Tenebroso

    Shadowymanner of

    dark settingsenveloping their

    occupants.

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