Art in the Difficult School || Anonymous (20th Century)by Leonardo Ricci

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  • National Art Education Association

    Anonymous (20th Century) by Leonardo RicciReview by: Charles RobertsonArt Education, Vol. 16, No. 6, Art in the Difficult School (Jun., 1963), p. 22Published by: National Art Education AssociationStable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3190569 .Accessed: 14/06/2014 19:20

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  • Watercolors Simplified, John Rogers, New York, Reinhold Publishing Corporation, 1962, 111 pages, $8.95.

    John Rogers' book is a good, sincere watercolor technique publication and is comparable to other good watercolor "how-to-do-it" books such as those of Kautsky and Whitney. Its catchy title, "Watercolors Simplified," would be more accurate if it were en- titled, "Simple Watercolors Explained." It is a very excellent reference book for an art student interested in pursuing watercolor painting beyond the dabbling stage. The book is recommended as an acceptable source of watercolor techniques for serious high school and college art students. The primary danger of this type of art instruction book, although very valuable as a source, is that the student could easily become another John Rogers in style and subject matter. Art instructors, especially at the high school level, should encourage the student to adopt and practice the water- color disciplines and techniques for individual use in his own style and creations.

    Charles T. Young, Austin Peay State College, Clarksville, Tennessee.

    Anonymous (20th Century). Leonardo Ricci, New York, George Braziller, 1962. 254 pp. $5.

    While reading this pagan pean to a world of

    potential goodness where man-the-technician is recon- ciled with man-the-humanist, I could not help thinking of the poems of Walt Whitman. There is a vigor in Ricci's visionary descriptions of what might be the city of some tomorrow that is related to exhortations of our own Whitman. But there is also a warmth and softness in this book caused by the mellow Mediter- ranean earth which sired this young Italian architect.

    What we have here apparently is a collection of essays rather loosely concerned with art, architecture, and city planning. But we find much more. Ricci ranges up and down the broad avenues of philosophy and politics in order to paint a verbal portrait of an artist deeply concerned with living space and pro- foundly involved with the man who occupies that space. It is a romantic self-portrait of a modern humanist.

    Charles Robertson, Pratt Institute, Brooklyn, New York.

    Visual Art for Industry, George Magnan, New York, Reinhold Publishing Corporation, December 1961, 176 pages, $12.00.

    This is a very practical book designed specifically for industry. It will be of value to the industrial art

    Watercolors Simplified, John Rogers, New York, Reinhold Publishing Corporation, 1962, 111 pages, $8.95.

    John Rogers' book is a good, sincere watercolor technique publication and is comparable to other good watercolor "how-to-do-it" books such as those of Kautsky and Whitney. Its catchy title, "Watercolors Simplified," would be more accurate if it were en- titled, "Simple Watercolors Explained." It is a very excellent reference book for an art student interested in pursuing watercolor painting beyond the dabbling stage. The book is recommended as an acceptable source of watercolor techniques for serious high school and college art students. The primary danger of this type of art instruction book, although very valuable as a source, is that the student could easily become another John Rogers in style and subject matter. Art instructors, especially at the high school level, should encourage the student to adopt and practice the water- color disciplines and techniques for individual use in his own style and creations.

    Charles T. Young, Austin Peay State College, Clarksville, Tennessee.

    Anonymous (20th Century). Leonardo Ricci, New York, George Braziller, 1962. 254 pp. $5.

    While reading this pagan pean to a world of

    potential goodness where man-the-technician is recon- ciled with man-the-humanist, I could not help thinking of the poems of Walt Whitman. There is a vigor in Ricci's visionary descriptions of what might be the city of some tomorrow that is related to exhortations of our own Whitman. But there is also a warmth and softness in this book caused by the mellow Mediter- ranean earth which sired this young Italian architect.

    What we have here apparently is a collection of essays rather loosely concerned with art, architecture, and city planning. But we find much more. Ricci ranges up and down the broad avenues of philosophy and politics in order to paint a verbal portrait of an artist deeply concerned with living space and pro- foundly involved with the man who occupies that space. It is a romantic self-portrait of a modern humanist.

    Charles Robertson, Pratt Institute, Brooklyn, New York.

    Visual Art for Industry, George Magnan, New York, Reinhold Publishing Corporation, December 1961, 176 pages, $12.00.

    This is a very practical book designed specifically for industry. It will be of value to the industrial art

    Watercolors Simplified, John Rogers, New York, Reinhold Publishing Corporation, 1962, 111 pages, $8.95.

    John Rogers' book is a good, sincere watercolor technique publication and is comparable to other good watercolor "how-to-do-it" books such as those of Kautsky and Whitney. Its catchy title, "Watercolors Simplified," would be more accurate if it were en- titled, "Simple Watercolors Explained." It is a very excellent reference book for an art student interested in pursuing watercolor painting beyond the dabbling stage. The book is recommended as an acceptable source of watercolor techniques for serious high school and college art students. The primary danger of this type of art instruction book, although very valuable as a source, is that the student could easily become another John Rogers in style and subject matter. Art instructors, especially at the high school level, should encourage the student to adopt and practice the water- color disciplines and techniques for individual use in his own style and creations.

    Charles T. Young, Austin Peay State College, Clarksville, Tennessee.

    Anonymous (20th Century). Leonardo Ricci, New York, George Braziller, 1962. 254 pp. $5.

    While reading this pagan pean to a world of

    potential goodness where man-the-technician is recon- ciled with man-the-humanist, I could not help thinking of the poems of Walt Whitman. There is a vigor in Ricci's visionary descriptions of what might be the city of some tomorrow that is related to exhortations of our own Whitman. But there is also a warmth and softness in this book caused by the mellow Mediter- ranean earth which sired this young Italian architect.

    What we have here apparently is a collection of essays rather loosely concerned with art, architecture, and city planning. But we find much more. Ricci ranges up and down the broad avenues of philosophy and politics in order to paint a verbal portrait of an artist deeply concerned with living space and pro- foundly involved with the man who occupies that space. It is a romantic self-portrait of a modern humanist.

    Charles Robertson, Pratt Institute, Brooklyn, New York.

    Visual Art for Industry, George Magnan, New York, Reinhold Publishing Corporation, December 1961, 176 pages, $12.00.

    This is a very practical book designed specifically for industry. It will be of value to the industrial art

    Watercolors Simplified, John Rogers, New York, Reinhold Publishing Corporation, 1962, 111 pages, $8.95.

    John Rogers' book is a good, sincere watercolor technique publication and is comparable to other good watercolor "how-to-do-it" books such as those of Kautsky and Whitney. Its catchy title, "Watercolors Simplified," would be more accurate if it were en- titled, "Simple Watercolors Explained." It is a very excellent reference book for an art student interested in pursuing watercolor painting beyond the dabbling stage. The book is recommended as an acceptable source of watercolor techniques for serious high school and college art students. The primary danger of this type of art instruction book, although very valuable as a source, is that the student could easily become another John Rogers in style and subject matter. Art instructors, especially at the high school level, should encourage the student to adopt and practice the water- color disciplines and techniques for individual use in his own style and creations.

    Charles T. Young, Austin Peay State College, Clarksville, Tennessee.

    Anonymous (20th Century). Leonardo Ricci, New York, George Braziller, 1962. 254 pp. $5.

    While reading this pagan pean to a world of

    potential goodness where man-the-technician is recon- ciled with man-the-humanist, I could not help thinking of the poems of Walt Whitman. There is a vigor in Ricci's visionary descriptions of what might be the city of some tomorrow that is related to exhortations of our own Whitman. But there is also a warmth and softness in this book caused by the mellow Mediter- ranean earth which sired this young Italian architect.

    What we have here apparently is a collection of essays rather loosely concerned with art, architecture, and city planning. But we find much more. Ricci ranges up and down the broad avenues of philosophy and politics in order to paint a verbal portrait of an artist deeply concerned with living space and pro- foundly involved with the man who occupies that space. It is a romantic self-portrait of a modern humanist.

    Charles Robertson, Pratt Institute, Brooklyn, New York.

    Visual Art for Industry, George Magnan, New York, Reinhold Publishing Corporation, December 1961, 176 pages, $12.00.

    This is a very practical book designed specifically for industry. It will be of value to the industrial art

    teacher and the art educator as a reference and re- source text. It gives a very excellent picture of the function of graphic presentation in modern industry. The technical illustrations are very clear and concise; the educator will find them of value and should bring them to the attention of the student contemplating entrance into the field of industrial illustration.

    The material in the book is well organized in a chronological sequence, and the distinction between "industrial art" and "industrial design" is made quite clear.

    The author has made it quite clear that the publi- cation concerns itself with "industrial art." The com- mercial artist has a place in industry, and industrial art is "utilitarian" in the area of communications and a vital part of today's industrial program.

    According to the author, "A centralized art group forms a major core of activity, performing art jobs of every possible variety for each of the company's functional departments."

    The section reviewing orthographic drawing, free- hand drawing, isometric drawing, and perspective is very well done, as is the material on production illus- tration. The illustrations are clear, concise, and easily read.

    The chapter on technical illustration should be of interest to the art educator, since the author has en- deavored to cover the subject matter of technical illustration very thoroughly. The discussion of the professional techniques used by the industrial artist in industry should be of interest to the art teacher and the professional art school.

    This book should be of value to both student and teacher in a high school, vocational or trade school, or at the college level as well as to management in our great industrial organizations.

    Walter M. Johnson, University of Illinois, Ur- bana, Illinois.

    Cubism, Impressionism, Non-Objective Art, Surreal- ism. 7 min., color. Available from Bailey Films, Inc., Hollywood 28, California.

    A series of five films of varying technical quality suitable for junior high school. Color quality and technical make-up range from poor in quality to ade-

    quate. The film Impressionism, is the best of the series in terms of technical presentation. The general approach is to identify characteristic artistic devices of the epoch utilizing various illustrations and ends with summary of points. Points characterizing the

    epochs are at times oversimplified to the point of los- ing their value.

    teacher and the art educator as a reference and re- source text. It gives a very excellent picture of the function of graphic presentation in modern industry. The technical illustrations are very clear and concise; the educator will find them of value and should bring them to the attention of the student contemplating entrance into the field of industrial illustration.

    The material in the book is well organized in a chronological sequence, and the distinction between "industrial art" and "industrial design" is made quite clear.

    The author has made it quite clear that the publi- cation concerns itself with "industrial art." The com- mercial artist has a place in industry, and industrial art is "utilitarian" in the area of communications and a vital part of today's industrial program.

    According to the author, "A centralized art group forms a major core of activity, performing art jobs of every possible variety for each of the company's functional departments."

    The section reviewing orthographic drawing, free- hand drawing, isometric drawing, and perspective is very well done, as is the material on production illus- tration. The illustrations are clear, concise, and easily read.

    The chapter on technical illustration should be of interest to the art educator, since the author has en- deavored to cover the subject matter of technical illustration very thoroughly. The discussion of the professional techniques used by the industrial artist in industry should be of interest to the art teacher and the professional art school.

    This book should be of value to both student and teacher in a high school, vocational or trade school, or at the college level as well as to management in our great industrial organizations.

    Walter M. Johnson, University of Illinois, Ur- bana, Illinois.

    Cubism, Impression...