Arc Flash Hazard Mitigation - IEEE Entity Web Hosting | A ...ewh.ieee.org/r3/atlanta/ias/2014-2015_Presentations/IEEE - Flash Hazard Mitigation August 25, 2015 Luaya Halig, PE Judy A. Robinson. 2 2 Agenda • Arc Flash Requirements – NFPA 70E and ... • IEEE 1584: “IEEE Guide

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    Arc Flash Hazard Mitigation

    August 25, 2015Luaya Halig, PEJudy A. Robinson

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    Agenda

    Arc Flash Requirements NFPA 70E and OSHA

    NEC Arc Energy Reduction Arc Flash Hazard Mitigation Techniques Arc Resistant Equipment

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    Arc Flash RequirementsNFPA 70E 2015OSHA 29 CFR 1910.269August 25, 2015Luaya Halig, P.E.Service Sales Engineer

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    Outline

    NFPA 70E 2015 Arc Flash Definition Overview of Arc Flash Requirements Important Changes to Arc Flash in latest Revision Arc Flash PPE Categories vs. Incident Energy

    Analysis Methodology

    OSHA 29 CFR 1910.269 What are The New Requirements? When is Compliance Due?

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    NFPA 70E 2015

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    Arc Flash Introduction (NFPA70E Article 100)

    Arc Flash Hazard - A dangerous condition associated with the possible release of energy caused by an electric arc.

    An arc flash hazard may exist when energized electrical conductors or circuit parts are exposed or when they are within equipment in a guarded or enclosed condition, provided a person is interacting with the equipment in such a manner that could cause an electric arc.

    Under normal operating conditions, enclosed energized equipment that has been properly installed and maintained is not likely to pose an arc flash hazard.

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    NFPA70E Overview - Article 130.2(A)Work Involving Electrical Hazards

    Am I required to wear PPE for every task performed on electrical equipment?

    Electrically Safe Working Conditions

    NFPA-70E Exceptions

    1. Additional Hazards or Increased Risk

    2. Infeasibility

    3. Less than 50 Volts

    New Exception to the 2014 NFPA-70E

    4. Normal Operation

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    NFPA70E Overview - Article 130.2(A)(4)Work Involving Electrical Hazards

    Normal operation of electric equipment shall be permitted where all of the following conditions are satisfied 130.2(A)(4):

    (1) The equipment is properly installed.

    (2) The equipment is properly maintained.

    (3) The equipment doors are closed and secured.

    (4) All equipment covers are in place and secured.

    (5) There is no evidence of impending failure.

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    Who Does These Changes Affect?

    Qualified personnel working on electrical equipment.

    Personnel working near energized electrical equipment.

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    New Terms in NFPA-70E

    Risk: A combination of the likelihood of occurrence of injury or damage

    to health and the severity of injury or damage to health that results from a hazard.

    Risk Assessment An overall process that identifies hazards, estimates the potential

    severity of injury or damage to health, estimates the likelihood of occurrence of injury or damage to health, and determines if protective measures are required.

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    NFPA 70E Changes

    Shock Risk Assessment ..shall determine the voltage to which personnel

    will be exposed, the boundary requirements, and the PPE necessary in order to minimize the possibility of electric shock to personnel.

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    NFPA 70E ChangesArticle 130.5

    Arc Flash Risk Assessment Is there an arc flash hazard? If so, the risk

    assessment must contain the following: Appropriate safe-work practices Arc Flash Boundary Appropriate PPE

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    NFPA 70E ChangesArticle 130.5

    Arc Flash Risk Assessment Update studies when major modifications or

    renovations take place. Study should be reviewed at an interval not to exceed five (5) years.

    Take into consideration the design and condition of overcurrent devices.

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    NFPA-70E Article 130.5 (C)Appropriate PPE

    Incident Energy Analysis

    Equations / Calculations

    Arc Flash PPE Categories Tables 130.7(C)(15)(A)(a)/(b),

    130.7(C)(15)(B), & 130.7(C)(16) PPE Categories 1-4

    Two Methods

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    Working in a Situation Where an Arc-Flash Hazard Exists: Arc-Flash Warning Label

    Electrical equipment that are likely to require examination, adjustment, servicing or maintenance while energized shall be field marked with a label containing the following (Refer to NFPA 70E-2015, Art. 130.5(D)):

    Nominal systems voltage

    Arc flash boundary

    At least one of the following:

    Available incident energy and the corresponding working distance, or the arc flash PPE category in Table 130.7(C)(15)(A)(b) or Table 130.7(C)(15)(B) for the equipment, but not both

    Minimum arc rating of clothing

    Site-specific level of PPE

    The method of calculating and data to support the information for the label shall be documented.

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    Arc Flash Labels

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    Arc-Flash Boundary

    An arc-flash boundary is an approach limit at which a person would be expected to receive a just curable burn on exposed skin if an arc flash were to occur.

    If you are required to work within the arc-flash boundary, you are also required to wear arc-rated garments.

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    Approach & Arc Flash Boundaries

    Arc Flash Boundary and Limits of Approach

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    Arc Flash PPE Categories Process

    Step 1: Refer to Table 130.7(C)(15)(A)(a)This table identifies arc flash hazards based on a list of common tasks.

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    Arc Flash PPE Categories Process

    Step 2: Refer to Table 130.7(C)(15)(A)(b) for AC Equipment or Table 130.7(C)(15)(B) for DC Equipment

    These tables can be used if associated parameters are met.

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    Arc Flash PPE Categories Process

    Step 3: Refer to Table 130.7(C)(16) for Personal Protective Equipment (PPE)

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    Arc Flash PPE Categories Process

    Step 1: Refer to Table 130.7(C)(15)(A)(a)This table identifies arc flash hazards based on a list of common tasks.

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    Maintenance RequirementsNFPA-70E Article 205.3

    Electrical equipment shall be maintained in accordance with manufacturers specifications and/or industry standards.

    Improper maintenance may result in increased opening time of devices

    PPE may not provide adequate protection

    Increased Incident Energy

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    OSHA 29 CFR

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    Excerpts from OSHA 29 CFR 1910

    The final rules for general industry and construction include new and revised provisions on host employers (facility operator) and contractors.

    training job briefings fall protection work on transmission and distribution lines working in manholes and vaults electrical hazards (including arc flash)

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    Protection from Flames & Electric Arcs OSHA 1910.269 (Appendix E)

    The employer shall: 1. Assess the workplace to identify employees exposed

    to hazards from flames or from electric arcs.2. Estimate incident energy values. 3. Ensure employees wear flame-resistant clothing and

    PPE with adequate arc ratings that will not melt or ignite and continue to burn.

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    Frequently Asked QuestionsOSHA Final Ruling

    What Methods are acceptable per OSHA Final Ruling? Below is a table taken from the final rule that illustrates what

    methods OSHA will accept for calculating incident energy.

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    Frequently Asked QuestionsOSHA Final Ruling

    From OSHA Final Ruling: OSHA based the determination of the level of PPE required under

    the final rule solely on incident heat energy. OSHAs final rule separates the determination of risk (that is, whether an employee is exposed to hazards posed by electric arcs), as required by final paragraph (g)(1), from the calculation of incident energy, as required by final paragraph (g)(2). Therefore, the Agency concludes that NFPA 70E Table methodology, is not a reasonable method of estimating incident energy under final paragraph (g)(2) and, therefore, is not referencing that table in Appendix E in the final rule.

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    When is Arc Flash Compliance Required?

    No later than January 1, 2015, employers must estimate the incident heat energy of any electric-arc hazard to which a worker would be exposed.

    No later than April 1, 2015, employers generally must provide workers exposed to hazards from electric arcs with protective clothing and other protective equipment with an arc rating greater than or equal to the estimated heat energy.

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    Frequently Asked QuestionsOSHA Final Ruling

    Question: I have already completed an arc flash study assessment for my facility. Do I need rerun the analysis per new OSHA regulations?

    Answer: Maybe? As long as the incident energy analysis was completed according

    to the guidelines in 1910.269 Appendix E. NFPA 70E requires that arc flash study assessments be updated

    at a minimum of every 5 years or when major changes are implemented to the power system.

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    Frequently Asked QuestionsOSHA Final Ruling

    Question: What kinds of fines does OSHA impose for violations?

    Answer: OSHA violations are defined as: Other than serious: Proposed penalty ($7,000 maximum) per violation Serious: Mandatory penalty ($7,000 maximum) per violation Willful: Minimum penalty of $5,000 up to $70,000 per violation If an employer is convicted of a willful violation of a standard that has

    resulted in the death of an employee, the offense is punishable by a court-imposed fine or by imprisonment for up to six months, or both. A fine of up to $250,000 for an individual, or $500,000 for a corporation, may be im

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