1
1095 Parliament Queen’s Speech In the Speech from the Throne at the -opening of Parliament on Nov. 1 it was announced that the Govern- ment proposed to increase war pensions, and retirement pensions, other benefits, and contributions under the National Insurance schemes. They would authorise an increasing level of expenditure on the physical recreation of the young. Awards for students at universities and for those taking comparable courses at other institutions of higher education would be granted on an improved basis. They would introduce a Bill to provide better means of dealing with young offenders; to extend compulsory after- care to prisoners and so to discourage them from reverting to crime; and to improve the management of approved schools. t ’ Welsh Teaching Hospital On Nov. 2, on the adjournment, Mr. LEO ABSE sharply criticised the plans for this new teaching hospital, which he described as an " ossified hospital design accepted from a septuagenarian architect by assessors led by another septuagen- arian architect... a design for a hospital for 1950, not as it should be for a 1980 hospital ". Wales wanted a forward- looking teaching hospital; it was being proffered a mausoleum. Going on to offer detailed criticisms, he said that the con- temptuous attitude to research was well illustrated by the location and space allocated to the animal house. In defiance of hospital planning, the X-ray department was so embedded within the building that expansion was well nigh impossible. A derisory amount of space was allocated for radioisotopes. A trivial 32 beds had been allocated to mental illness, and there was still no sign of a department and chair in psychiatry being created. But the most dismaying feature was the ludicrous amount of space allocated for research in relation to bed space. The design gave every appearance of there having been a battle for beds between heads of departments. Other points which he made were: quiet rooms in the noisiest part of the building; the sluice room farthest from the beds most needing its services and unrelated to treatment suite; cross-infection risks increased by infected material being brought into the ward suite for disposal and by inadequate air-conditioning; lavatories concentrated in blocks and not related to bed areas or day spaces; an operating- theatre with a wood-block floor which could never be sluiced clean; eight-storey light wells which meant that wards would be badly lit and have a wretched outlook. All these blunders and many more, he added, would be housed in a dull cliff-like bulk of buildings unmistakably institutional in appearance. Miss EDITH PITT, the parliamentary secretary to the Ministry of Health, welcomed the opportunity of discussing the University Hospital of Wales and of replying to some of the criticisms. The fact that it was an undergraduate medical school dictated not only the concept of the work to be performed there but also the site of the hospital, which was to have 650 beds. The scheme must be viewed against the development of acute hospital services in South Wales, which included not only another major acute regional hospital working in the Cardiff area, but also major acute hospitals at Bridgend, Pontypridd, and Newport, and others in the Welsh Hospital Board’s plans for Merthyr and North Monmouthshire. The Board of Governors of the United Cardiff Hospitals and the Welsh National School of Medicine desired a hospital integrated with a medical school, with the closest possible working arrangements between the professional and the clinical staff and with the various departments and their research and other laboratories. An architectural competition for an important * Details of these proposals are given on p. 1081. t Details of these proposals are given on p. 1082. scheme of this size was thought preferable to selecting an architect, because it was believed that competition would give incentive to a number of architects to think about the problems set by the promoters, and that new ideas and techniques might be evolved. Competition, however, could do no more than select an architect and, in a scheme of this size, a fundamental design. The promoters and architect could deal with each other on paper only in broad outline. The details must wait till later. A series of working parties had now been set up to go into the plans of the various units with the architect and with the engineer. Ward units, outpatient department, lifts and communications, catering and food distribution, training accommodation, the dental school, were all being looked at in this way. The internal design and layout of the ward unit, for instance, had already been replanned to provide better access and better supervision, to take account of the latest thoughts on cross-infection; more single rooms had been provided, and the large ten-bed unit had been broken up into smaller units. This was a normal process which one would expect to take place with any design, and similar replanning was going on throughout the hospital. The promoters had examined the design carefully in the light of the numerous criticisms and were satisfied that the completion of the process of preparation of detailed sketch plans, which was now going on, would give them a modern and efficient hospital and a medical teaching centre. She thought it premature at this stage to be too critical of the detailed planning because the details had still to be filled in. It was her earnest hope that, when this hospital was completed, the Welsh people would have a hospital in accord- ance with their wishes and a hospital of which they might be proud. QUESTION TIME Poliomyelitis Vaccination At Sept. 30, 13,333,000 people in England and Wales had been vaccinated against poliomyelitis under the National Health Service. Appointments BIRKBECK, M. Q., M.B. Cantab., D.PHYS.MED.: consultant in physical medicine, Northampton/Kettering area. BROWNE"M. P., M.B.E., M.B. N.U.I., D.T.M. & H.: airport M.o., health control unit, London Airport. BURTLES, RICHARD, M.B. Lond., F.F.A. R.c.s.: consultant anaesthetist, Northampton and Kettering area. EMERY, RALPH, M.B. Lond., M.R.c.P.E., D.P.M. : assistant psychiatrist (s.H.M.o.), Aylesbury and High Wycombe area. ETON, BRUCE, M.D. Manc., M.R.C.O.G. : S.H.M.O., maternity hospital, Cambridge. LUNN, J. E., M.B. Glasg., D.P.H., D.P.A.: assistant M.o.H. and assistant school M.o., Oldham. ORTON, W. T., M.B. Belf., D.P.H. : senior assistant M.o., Wembley and Willesden. Birmingham Regional Hospital Board: BATTEN, R. L., F.R.C.S. : consultant surgeon, West Bromwich group of hospitals. GALLA, THOMAS, M.B. Edin., D.P.M. : consultant and deputy medical superintendent, St. Edward’s Hospital, Cheddleton and Stoke-on- Trent hospital group. HILL, EILEEN E., M.D. Glasg., M.R.C.P., D.c.H.: consultant paediatrician, Birmingham (Selly Oak) hospital group. ROBB, H. P., M.B. Aberd., D.P.M. : consultant psychiatrist and deputy medical superintendent, Lea Hospital and Lea Castle Hospital. Ross, J. H., M.D. Cantab., M.R.C.P., D.OBST.: part-time consultant physician, Herefordshire hospital group. SAGE, R. H., M.B. Birm., F.R.C.S. : consultant surgeon, Birmingham (Selly Oak) hospital group. Liverpool Regional Hospital Board: OSWALD, D. C., M.B. Dubl.: assistant pathologist, Birkenhead H.M.C. PORTER, R. A., M.B. Belf.: deputy medical superintendent (s.H.M.o.), Moss Side Hospital. SNOW, R. G., M.B. Birm., F.F.A. R.C.S.: part-time consultant anaesthetist, Chester area. Manchester Regional Hospital Board: FLEMING, A. C., M.B. Durh., D.P.M. : consultant psychiatrist and medical superintendent, Calderstones Hospital, Whalley, near Blackburn. GRIMSHAW, LINTON, D.F.C., M.B. Mane., D.P.M.: consultant psychiatrist, Bury and Rossendale hospital group. KRAWIECKI, J. A., M.B. Edin., D.P.M. : consultant psychiatrist, West Manchester and Springfield and Swinton hospital groups. METCALFE, W. J., M.B. Mane., F.R.C.S. : consultant surgeon, Blackburn and district hospital group. SIMPSON, D. C., M.B. Edin.: senior casualty officer, Withington Hospital, near Manchester.

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1095

Parliament

Queen’s SpeechIn the Speech from the Throne at the -opening of

Parliament on Nov. 1 it was announced that the Govern-ment proposed to increase war pensions, and retirementpensions, other benefits, and contributions under the

National Insurance schemes. They would authorise anincreasing level of expenditure on the physical recreationof the young. Awards for students at universities and forthose taking comparable courses at other institutions ofhigher education would be granted on an improved basis.They would introduce a Bill to provide better means ofdealing with young offenders; to extend compulsory after-care to prisoners and so to discourage them from revertingto crime; and to improve the management of approvedschools. t ’

Welsh Teaching HospitalOn Nov. 2, on the adjournment, Mr. LEO ABSE sharply

criticised the plans for this new teaching hospital, which hedescribed as an " ossified hospital design accepted from aseptuagenarian architect by assessors led by another septuagen-arian architect... a design for a hospital for 1950, not as itshould be for a 1980 hospital ". Wales wanted a forward-

looking teaching hospital; it was being proffered a mausoleum.Going on to offer detailed criticisms, he said that the con-

temptuous attitude to research was well illustrated by thelocation and space allocated to the animal house. In defianceof hospital planning, the X-ray department was so embeddedwithin the building that expansion was well nigh impossible.A derisory amount of space was allocated for radioisotopes.A trivial 32 beds had been allocated to mental illness, and therewas still no sign of a department and chair in psychiatry beingcreated. But the most dismaying feature was the ludicrousamount of space allocated for research in relation to bed space.The design gave every appearance of there having been a battlefor beds between heads of departments.Other points which he made were: quiet rooms in the noisiest part

of the building; the sluice room farthest from the beds most needingits services and unrelated to treatment suite; cross-infection risksincreased by infected material being brought into the ward suite fordisposal and by inadequate air-conditioning; lavatories concentratedin blocks and not related to bed areas or day spaces; an operating-theatre with a wood-block floor which could never be sluiced clean;eight-storey light wells which meant that wards would be badly litand have a wretched outlook.

All these blunders and many more, he added, would behoused in a dull cliff-like bulk of buildings unmistakablyinstitutional in appearance.Miss EDITH PITT, the parliamentary secretary to the

Ministry of Health, welcomed the opportunity of discussingthe University Hospital of Wales and of replying to some of thecriticisms. The fact that it was an undergraduate medicalschool dictated not only the concept of the work to be performedthere but also the site of the hospital, which was to have 650beds. The scheme must be viewed against the development ofacute hospital services in South Wales, which included not onlyanother major acute regional hospital working in the Cardiffarea, but also major acute hospitals at Bridgend, Pontypridd,and Newport, and others in the Welsh Hospital Board’s plansfor Merthyr and North Monmouthshire.The Board of Governors of the United Cardiff Hospitals and

the Welsh National School of Medicine desired a hospitalintegrated with a medical school, with the closest possibleworking arrangements between the professional and the clinicalstaff and with the various departments and their research andother laboratories. An architectural competition for an important

* Details of these proposals are given on p. 1081.t Details of these proposals are given on p. 1082.

scheme of this size was thought preferable to selecting anarchitect, because it was believed that competition would giveincentive to a number of architects to think about the problemsset by the promoters, and that new ideas and techniques mightbe evolved. Competition, however, could do no more thanselect an architect and, in a scheme of this size, a fundamentaldesign. The promoters and architect could deal with each otheron paper only in broad outline. The details must wait till later.A series of working parties had now been set up to go into theplans of the various units with the architect and with theengineer.

Ward units, outpatient department, lifts and communications,catering and food distribution, training accommodation, the dentalschool, were all being looked at in this way. The internal design andlayout of the ward unit, for instance, had already been replanned toprovide better access and better supervision, to take account of thelatest thoughts on cross-infection; more single rooms had beenprovided, and the large ten-bed unit had been broken up into smallerunits.

This was a normal process which one would expect to take

place with any design, and similar replanning was going onthroughout the hospital. The promoters had examined the

design carefully in the light of the numerous criticisms andwere satisfied that the completion of the process of preparationof detailed sketch plans, which was now going on, would givethem a modern and efficient hospital and a medical teachingcentre. She thought it premature at this stage to be too criticalof the detailed planning because the details had still to be filledin. It was her earnest hope that, when this hospital wascompleted, the Welsh people would have a hospital in accord-ance with their wishes and a hospital of which they might beproud.

QUESTION TIMEPoliomyelitis Vaccination

At Sept. 30, 13,333,000 people in England and Wales hadbeen vaccinated against poliomyelitis under the NationalHealth Service.

Appointments

BIRKBECK, M. Q., M.B. Cantab., D.PHYS.MED.: consultant in physicalmedicine, Northampton/Kettering area.

BROWNE"M. P., M.B.E., M.B. N.U.I., D.T.M. & H.: airport M.o., health controlunit, London Airport.

BURTLES, RICHARD, M.B. Lond., F.F.A. R.c.s.: consultant anaesthetist,Northampton and Kettering area.

EMERY, RALPH, M.B. Lond., M.R.c.P.E., D.P.M. : assistant psychiatrist(s.H.M.o.), Aylesbury and High Wycombe area.

ETON, BRUCE, M.D. Manc., M.R.C.O.G. : S.H.M.O., maternity hospital,Cambridge.

LUNN, J. E., M.B. Glasg., D.P.H., D.P.A.: assistant M.o.H. and assistantschool M.o., Oldham.

ORTON, W. T., M.B. Belf., D.P.H. : senior assistant M.o., Wembley andWillesden.

Birmingham Regional Hospital Board:BATTEN, R. L., F.R.C.S. : consultant surgeon, West Bromwich group of

hospitals.GALLA, THOMAS, M.B. Edin., D.P.M. : consultant and deputy medical

superintendent, St. Edward’s Hospital, Cheddleton and Stoke-on-Trent hospital group.

HILL, EILEEN E., M.D. Glasg., M.R.C.P., D.c.H.: consultant paediatrician,Birmingham (Selly Oak) hospital group.

ROBB, H. P., M.B. Aberd., D.P.M. : consultant psychiatrist and deputymedical superintendent, Lea Hospital and Lea Castle Hospital.

Ross, J. H., M.D. Cantab., M.R.C.P., D.OBST.: part-time consultant physician,Herefordshire hospital group.

SAGE, R. H., M.B. Birm., F.R.C.S. : consultant surgeon, Birmingham (SellyOak) hospital group.

Liverpool Regional Hospital Board:OSWALD, D. C., M.B. Dubl.: assistant pathologist, Birkenhead H.M.C.PORTER, R. A., M.B. Belf.: deputy medical superintendent (s.H.M.o.), Moss

Side Hospital.SNOW, R. G., M.B. Birm., F.F.A. R.C.S.: part-time consultant anaesthetist,

Chester area.

Manchester Regional Hospital Board:FLEMING, A. C., M.B. Durh., D.P.M. : consultant psychiatrist and medical

superintendent, Calderstones Hospital, Whalley, near Blackburn.GRIMSHAW, LINTON, D.F.C., M.B. Mane., D.P.M.: consultant psychiatrist,

Bury and Rossendale hospital group.KRAWIECKI, J. A., M.B. Edin., D.P.M. : consultant psychiatrist, West

Manchester and Springfield and Swinton hospital groups.METCALFE, W. J., M.B. Mane., F.R.C.S. : consultant surgeon, Blackburn and

district hospital group.SIMPSON, D. C., M.B. Edin.: senior casualty officer, Withington Hospital,

near Manchester.