ANTHROPOLOGY ... Anthropology - Introduction Introduction Course Philosophy Anthropology is a semester

  • View
    1

  • Download
    0

Embed Size (px)

Text of ANTHROPOLOGY ... Anthropology - Introduction Introduction Course Philosophy Anthropology is a...

  • FREEHOLD REGIONAL HIGH SCHOOL DISTRICT

    OFFICE OF CURRICULUM AND INSTRUCTION

    SOCIAL STUDIES DEPARTMENT

    ANTHROPOLOGY

    Grade Level: 10-12

    Credits: 2.5

    BOARD OF EDUCATION ADOPTION DATE:

    AUGUST 27, 2012 SUPPORTING RESOURCES AVAILABLE IN DISTRICT RESOURCE SHARING

    APPENDIX A: ACCOMMODATIONS AND MODIFICATIONS

    APPENDIX B: ASSESSMENT EVIDENCE

    APPENDIX C: INTERDISCIPLINARY CONNECTIONS

    https://docs.google.com/document/d/1mEcdd5YsukZgMjnuU4GLQbRsGh-qzbT5eC0sUSt3M0o/edit?usp=sharing

  • Board of Education

    Mr. Heshy Moses, President Mrs. Jennifer Sutera, Vice President

    Mr. Carl Accettola Mr. William Bruno

    Mrs. Elizabeth Canario Mrs. Kathie Lavin

    Mr. Ronald G. Lawson Mr. Michael Messinger Ms. Maryanne Tomazic

    Mr. Charles Sampson, Superintendent

    Ms. Donna M. Evangelista, Assistant Superintendent for Curriculum and Instruction

    Curriculum Writing Committee Ms. Jamie Krieger-Lundquist

    Mrs. Sean Leahy

    Supervisors

    Mr. Peter Krais Mr. David Bleakley Ms. Judith Newins Mr. Stanley Koba Ms. Michelle Lilley

  • Anthropology - Introduction Introduction  

     

    Course Philosophy   Anthropology is a semester course that provides students with the knowledge and skill sets necessary to understand the full sweep and complexity of  humanity.  By examining the origins of human ancestry the student must not only consider the social, cultural, and historical aspect of civilization, but  must also use scientific skills to evaluate theories and piece together the story of our past.  Anthropology allows the learner to gain an appreciation of  how far the human species has evolved, and creates an application of knowledge to the solution of human problems.  This examination will ultimately  create more socially aware and responsible citizens. 

     

    Course Description    

    Anthropology offers an in depth examination of the cultural, physical, and social aspects of civilization.  Additionally, this course incorporates authentic  learning experiences throughout the curriculum including an archeological simulation.  The skills of artifact recovery, interpretation, and preservation,  are carried over into the cultural as well as forensic units and help to inform modern legal application.  By the end of the course, students will have  obtained greater knowledge and fuller respect for the diverse cultures of the world in the past, present, and future. Students' skill sets will be enriched  and improved to include formulating scientifically sound hypotheses and educated opinions, primary source research and analysis, and real‐world  application of anthropological knowledge.       

     

                       

  •    

    Course Map and Proficiencies/Pacing    

    Course Map    

    Relevant  Standards 

    Enduring Understanding Essential Questions  Assessments 

    Diagnostic  Formative  Summative      6.1.12 D.14.e     5.3.12 E.1, E.2, E.3, and  E.4    LA.11‐12.RH.11‐12.1      LA.11‐12.RH.11‐12.7    LA.11‐12.WHST.11‐ 12.1.a    LA.11‐12.WHST.11‐ 12.7   

    All societies attempt to  explain the nature of  human existence.   

    How has Darwin's Theory of  Evolution sparked debate and  controversy throughout history?    What common themes can be  found in ancient and modern  belief systems?      What are the major elements of  the debate between evolution  and creationism? 

    About Me Surveys    Discussion Based  Questions    Warm Up/Do Now  Questions     Reading  Comprehension of  scholarly articles 

    Elements of Creation  Beliefs Comparison    Charles Darwin‐Theory of  Evolution Quiz    Daily Journal Entries    Examination of Scopes  Monkey Trial 

    Persuasive Essay‐ Social  Impact of Darwinism    Project Based  Assessment‐ Theories  on the Creation of the  Universe    Unit Test 

    6.2.12 D.4.k    6.2.12 B.6.a      LA.11‐12.RH.11‐12.2    LA.11‐12.RH.11‐12.8    LA.11‐12.WHST.11‐ 12.4 

    Every society has culture.   

    What are cultural universals?    What are similarities and  differences between cultures?    How can we better promote  cultural acceptance? 

    Snapshot of Me  Project‐ Personal  Culture Show & Tell    KWL Chart    Prewrite Activities 

    Class Discussion    Cultural Anthropology  Readings    Elements of Culture  Quizzes    Multimedia Presentations

    Create‐A‐Culture  Project    Unit Test    Careers in Anthropology  Project                           

    6.2.12 D.2.d    5.1.12 A.1    LA.11‐12.RH.11‐12.3    LA.11‐12.RH.11‐12.9    LA.11‐12.WHST.11‐ 12.6 

    Evidence is open to cultural  and scientific  interpretation.   

    How do personal beliefs impact  individual interpretation of  historical evidence?    How have the standards of  evidence in the legal system  changed over time?    How can a complete and  thorough analysis be achieved  when evidence is lacking? 

    Prewrite Activities    KWL Chart    Pre‐test    Remote Responders 

    Streaming Video    Document Analysis    Quizzes    Debates    Online Forums 

    Crime Scene Project    Unit Test    Essays    Crime Journal    Archaeological Dig  Simulation 

  • 6.1.12 D.3.a,      6.2.12 D.1.a    6.2.12 B.6.a    LA.11‐12.RH.11‐12.2    LA.11‐12.RH.11‐12.8    LA.11‐12.WHST.11‐ 12.4 

    Culture is a human  adaptation to the  environment.   

    How does culture evolve and  adapt over time?    How does geography impact  culture?    What is Cultural Relativism? 

    Elements of Culture  Pre‐Test    Identify/Describe the  elements in modern  teenage culture   

    Primary Source Document  Analysis    Comparative Cultures   Assignments such as  Venn‐Diagrams or quizzes   Streaming  Video/Documentary  Viewing quizzes and/or  discussions 

    Create‐A‐Culture  Project (can be used in  conjunction with the  Archaeological Dig  Project)    Evolution of Culture  Performance  Assessment 

      6.2.12 D.2.d    6.2.12 C.6.d    LA.11‐12.R.CCR.7    LA.11‐12.W.CCR.1    LA.11‐12.WHST.11‐ 12.1.b    LA.11‐12.WHST.11‐ 12.6    LA.11‐12.WHST.11‐ 12.7     

    Science is a catalyst for  social change. 

    How has Scientific Theory  changed over time? 

    Pre‐Test    Discussion    Examination of historic  evidence 

    Timeline of scientific  discoveries    Expository Essay    Debate       Streaming  Video/Documentary  Viewing quizzes and/or  discussions 

      Modern Scientific  Discovery Presentation   Evidence Evaluation  Assessment    Writing a Scientific  Research Grant 

    6.2.12 D.6.a    9.1.12 A.3     9.1.12 B.1    LA.11‐12.W.CCR.5 

    Understanding human  qualities is a vital social  skill.   

    What are major similarities  and differences among  cultures?      

    Discussion    Student resume 

    Job Interview  Simulation    Geographic Impact  Survey    Guest Speaker Q/A 

    Job/Careers in  Anthropology  Portfolio or  Presentation Project    Mock Resume Project

      

     

     

  • Proficiencies and Pacing   It is recommended that the culture unit precede the archaeology unit. However, the placement of these units may depend upon the weather.  The  archaeology unit should be conducted either in marking period 1 or in marking period 4 due to the outdoor element of the "Big Dig" project.  If it is  not possible to conduct an archeological dig outside, please follow the Semester #2 schedule.    

    Unit Title  Unit Understanding(s) and Goal(s)  Recommended  Duration 

    Unit 1: Cultural  Anthropology 

        Understandings:  Culture is a human adaptation to the environment.  Evidence is open to cultural and scientific interpretation.  Every society has culture.  All societies attempt to explain the nature human existence.    Goals:   

    1. Students will be able to describe the evolution of man from nomadic hunter‐gatherer  societies to sedentary farming civilizations. 

    2. Students will be able to compare and contrast the successes of independent invention  and cultural diffusion. 

    3. Students will be able to identify, compare/contrast cultural universals across space and  time. 

    4. Students will be able to identify common themes in historical creation stories.  5. Students will be able to create a fictitious culture.  6. Students will be able to examine evidence and artifacts to analyze the culture of a 

    fictitious civilization.  7. Students will be able to evaluate the costs and benefits of modernization on human 

    civilization.