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A nnual Trauma Services Report April 1, 2000 to March 31, 2001

Annual Report 2000-2001 - Alberta Health Services · Regional Trauma Services Annual Report 4 2000/2001 INTRODUCTION Dr. John B. Kortbeek, Director, Regional Trauma Services, Calgary

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Page 1: Annual Report 2000-2001 - Alberta Health Services · Regional Trauma Services Annual Report 4 2000/2001 INTRODUCTION Dr. John B. Kortbeek, Director, Regional Trauma Services, Calgary

Annual

Trauma

Services

Report

April 1, 2000 to March 31, 2001

Page 2: Annual Report 2000-2001 - Alberta Health Services · Regional Trauma Services Annual Report 4 2000/2001 INTRODUCTION Dr. John B. Kortbeek, Director, Regional Trauma Services, Calgary

Regional Trauma Services Annual Report 22000/2001

Calgary Health Region

Regional Trauma Services Annual Report 2000/2001

Table of Contents

Organizational Structure 3

Introduction 4

Foothills Medical Centre 5

Trauma Service Activities 6Clinical 6Education 6· Conferences/Workshops 6· Trauma Nursing Core Course® 7· Advanced Trauma Life Support® 7· Inservice/Orientation 7· Trauma Rounds 8· Quality Improvement 9

Research 9Administration 19Data Management 21Performance Indicators 22TRISS Methodology 33Trauma Web Page 34

Alberta Children’s Hospital 35

Pediatric Trauma Program 36Trauma Service Activities 36Committee Representation 36Education 37Research 37Pediatric Trauma Coordinator 37Trauma Rounds 39Performance Indicators 40TRISS Methodology 48

Trauma Statistics 49

Burn Report 76

Calgary Emergency Medical Services Statistics 79

Injury Control Report 81

Injury Statistics 88

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Regional Trauma Services Annual Report 32000/2001

Organizational Structure

Regional Trauma Services personnel include:

Foothills Medical Centre Site:

Ms. Janet Umphrey, Executive Director

Dr. Cam Waddell, Medical Director

Ms. Sue Conroy, Director Emergency/Trauma Services

Dr. John Kortbeek, Regional Medical Director, Trauma Services

Ms. Jane Bartlett, Regional Trauma Services Manager

Ms. Patricia Long, Regional Trauma Services Coordinator

Ms. Christi Findlay, Regional Trauma Services Data Analyst

Ms. Michaile Lovatt, Regional Trauma Services Data Analyst

Ms. Sandra Dowkes, Regional Trauma Services Secretary

Alberta Children’s Hospital Site:

Mr. Hume Martin, Executive Director

Ms. Bonnie Johnston, Director In-patient and Related Services

Dr. Robin Eccles, Chair Pediatric Trauma Committee

Ms. Kerry Larkin, Patient Care Manager Emergency

Ms. Jeanette Pearce, Regional Pediatric Trauma Coordinator

Ms. Michaile Lovatt, Regional Trauma Services Data Analyst

District Trauma Site Trauma Committee Chair’s:

Dr. Bruce Rothwell: Peter Lougheed Centre Trauma Committee

Dr. Gerald Lazarenko: Rockyview Hospital Trauma Committee

Acknowledgements to former personnel:

• Dr. Chris Eagle, Executive Director, FMC• Ms. Pam Holberton, Trauma Services Manager, CHR• Ms. Cathy Dobson, Pediatric Trauma Coordinator• Ms. Cathy Hubley, Trauma Data Analyst

Page 4: Annual Report 2000-2001 - Alberta Health Services · Regional Trauma Services Annual Report 4 2000/2001 INTRODUCTION Dr. John B. Kortbeek, Director, Regional Trauma Services, Calgary

Regional Trauma Services Annual Report 42000/2001

INTRODUCTION

Dr. John B. Kortbeek, Director, Regional Trauma Services, Calgary Health Region

The Pine Lake tornado was a sentinel event during the past year for Calgary’s Regional Trauma Service.The tornado touched down on a hot Friday afternoon leaving in its path at least 300 injured amidst chaosand turmoil. The initial disaster response was well coordinated and efficient, with cooperation between avariety of agencies, including EMS and police.

Scene management included evacuation by ground ambulance and STARS helicopters. Subsequenttriage assessment and resuscitation in Red Deer was also coordinated and efficient. Eleven fixed wingdedicated aircraft of the provincial air ambulance system were positioned in Red Deer to transportpatients to Calgary and Edmonton.

When the disaster was declared in Calgary, the response from personnel was tremendous. The initialtransfer of major trauma patients to the Calgary region appeared to be quite manageable, resulting in adowngrade of the disaster response. Over the ensuing weekend a larger number of patients weretransported to Calgary than expected, many arriving from small hospitals where they had been takendirectly by local ground ambulance crews.

In addition, the tornado coincided with one of the busiest trauma weeks ever. Over 35 major motorvehicle crash victims were treated at the Foothills Medical Centre that week. The major trauma inpatientcensus peaked at approximately eighty patients. The disaster illustrated the preparedness of the system,as well as highlighted areas for improvement.

A major initiative of the Calgary region involving the trauma service over the past year has been to dissectlast summer’s event and prepare for a future multi-casualty incident. These efforts have become quitetimely with the announcement of the G8 meeting in Kananaskis next summer, given the recentexperience in Milan. Tremendous growth in the Calgary region and a booming economy have allowedthe Calgary Health Region to attract new, highly skilled, committed and energetic individuals in a varietyof disciplines who will be tremendous contributors to the trauma program. This includes new recruits inneurosurgery, intensive care, general/trauma surgery, vascular and thoracic surgery, as well asemergency medicine.

The announcement of the new Alberta Children's Hospital facility on the West University campus offersgreat potential for the evolution of Trauma Services. The region will work with Trauma Services at theAlberta Children's Hospital headed by Dr. Robin Eccles in the coming years. The scope, response andneeds of the Children’s tertiary trauma facility will be developed.

The Calgary Regional Trauma Service continues to promote the establishment of benchmarks for traumacare, included in the report. A complete summary of our performance indicators are also included in thereport.

We continue to work with our colleagues in Alberta, and the Alberta Centre for Injury Control andResearch in the development of the provincial trauma proposal. The service has also been active inongoing initiatives in setting trauma system standards with the Trauma Association of Canada and theAmerican College of Surgeons Committee on Trauma.

The Trauma Services Annual Report reflects the commitment, energy and dedication of our staff inmeeting the challenges of providing excellent trauma care in an era of increased scrutiny, risingexpectations and tight budgets.

We welcome your suggestions and feedback. Please feel free to contact any of the trauma services staffwith your comments and suggestions.

Submitted by John B. Kortbeek MD FRCSC FACS

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Regional Trauma Services Annual Report 52000/2001

Foothills Medical Centre

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Regional Trauma Services Annual Report 62000/2001

TRAUMA SERVICE ACTIVITIES

The Regional Trauma Service continues to provide support for trauma care in the followingareas:

1. Clinical2. Education3. Quality Improvement4. Research5. Administration6. Data Management

1. CLINICAL

Clinical follow through of trauma patients remains an important component of the traumaservice. Collaboration with staff, physicians and residents assists with identification of clinicalprojects.

As a result of these activities, refinements to the trauma team activation process have beenachieved, as well as the provision of educational activities suited to the needs of the variousclinical areas.

2. EDUCATION:

Conferences/Workshops:2000/2001

University of Calgary weekly Trauma Resident Rounds –Trauma Services

Calgary Continuous

University of Calgary Undergraduate Trauma Seminars –Trauma Services

Calgary Continuous

2001Academic Half-days, University of Calgary, Trauma –John Kortbeek

Calgary April

Academic Half-days, University of Calgary, Post-operative Care – John Kortbeek

Calgary April

Evolution of Trauma Care in Calgary and LessonsLearned from the Pine Lake Tornado (slides)

St. GeorgeHospitalSurgical GrandRounds,Australia

March

Difficult trauma cases: What would you do? Presentedat the Trauma Association of Canada/Australian TraumaSociety Meeting.

Trauma 2001Sydney,Australia

March

M. Monroy, C. Doig, S. McFadden, J.B. Kortbeek. Post-traumatic empyema and pneumonia in blunt chesttrauma following thoracostomy (poster). Presented at theTrauma Association of Canada/Australian TraumaSociety Meeting.

Trauma 2001Sydney,Australia

March

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Regional Trauma Services Annual Report 72000/2001

Workun S.A., Knox L., Doig C., Burrowes P., Larsen G.,Kortbeek J. Prospective evaluation of CT scanning forthe spinal clearance of unconscious trauma patients(Bearpit). Presented at the Trauma Association ofCanada/Australian Trauma Society Meeting.

Trauma 2001Sydney,Australia

March

M Dunham, E Hofer, S Nichols, R Moore, J Kortbeek &R Karmy-Jones. Endovascular stenting for blunt aorticinjury: A tale of two cities. Presented at the TraumaAssociation of Canada/Australian Trauma SocietyMeeting.

Trauma 2001Sydney,Australia

March

The Trauma Perspective (Chair) Trauma 2001Sydney,Australia

March

Combined TAC/Australasia Trauma Society – PatriciaLong, Attendee

Sydney,Australia

March

2000International Conference on Pediatric Trauma – RobinEccles, Attendee.

Colorado, USA June

Trauma Nursing Core Course® (TNCC®):

• Calgary June & November 2000, January & March2001

Many other TNCC® courses have been offered by other nursing personnel throughout theprovince and by Trauma Services in the Capital Health Authority.

Advanced Trauma Life Support® (ATLS®):

• Student Provider Courses: April 13-15, May 11-13, June 15-17, October5-7, 2000 & February 1-3, 2001

• Instructor Course: November 18, 2000

In-service/Orientation

Monthly trauma orientations · residents (GS, Trauma, ICU)· clinical clerks, fellows, electives,

international medical studentsThoracic Trauma, Emergency, March 2001 · ED staff

· general surgery residents· respiratory therapists

Caring for Families/Trauma Patients in Crisis,March 2001

· ED staff

Blunt Cardiac Trauma, August, September2000

· ED staff

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Regional Trauma Services Annual Report 82000/2001

Trauma Rounds, 0730-0830

2000

April 28 Metabolic Responses to Trauma: Current Concepts- Dr. Morad Hameed, U of Miami

May 26 Prehospital Crichothyrotomy and Rapid Sequence Intubation: ACritical Review- Dr. Andy Anton, Medical Director, EMS

September 29 Pine Lake Disaster – Videoconference- STARS: Dr. Greg Powell, Dr. Lance Shepard- Emergency: Dr. Arun Abbi- Trauma Services/General Surgery: Dr. John Kortbeek- Orthopedics: Dr. Jim Powell- Anesthesia: Dr. Jennifer Froelich- ICU: Dr. Chip Doig

October 27 Spinal Instability- Dr. Stephan J. DuPlessis, Spinal Neurosurgery, U of C Spine Program

December 1 Pain Management of the Injured Patient- Dr. Rob Mulloy, General Surgery- Dr. Jennifer Froelich, Anesthesia

2001January 26 Open Pelvic Fractures

- Dr. Jim Powell, Associate Clinical Professor, University of Calgary

February 23 Trauma Care Comes of Age- Dr. Leanelle Goldstein, UCSD Medical Centre, San Diego, CA

March 23 Protection Against Ballistic Injuries- Lt. Col. Ian Anderson, MD, CM, FRCSC Fellow – Critical Care/Trauma

Rounds sponsored by

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Regional Trauma Services Annual Report 92000/2001

3. QUALITY IMPROVEMENT

The measurement and evaluation of the various components of the trauma service continues tobe of prime importance in directing and improving the quality of care delivered at both the adultand pediatric sites within the region. At the FMC and ACH, quarterly reviews of statistics andperformance indicators are compiled for analysis and review. At the PLC and RGH,reports/issues generated from various sources are brought forward for review at the respectivetrauma committees on a quarterly basis.

Projects related to the trauma quality improvement process include:

• review of standards of care and benchmarks within other trauma service organizations• revision and development of performance indicators for adult and pediatric trauma• revision of guidelines for communication between prehospital personnel and trauma team

leaders/team• ongoing revisions to the trauma team activation process• Manager attended Team Based Process Improvement Orientation as part of QIHI initiatives• ongoing review of all trauma laparotomies

4. RESEARCH

JOHN B. KORTBEEK

Abstracts

Dunham M, Hofer, E, Nichols S, Moore R, Kortbeek J. Endovascular stenting for blunt aorticinjury: A tale of two cities. J Trauma 50(6):1166, 2001

Workun S, Knox L, Doig C, Burrowes P, Larsen G, Kortbeek J. Prospective evaluation of CTscanning for the spinal clearance of unconscious trauma patients. J Trauma 50(6):1165, 2001

Monroy M, Doig C, McFadden S, Kortbeek J. Post-traumatic empyema and pneumonia in bluntchest trauma following thoracostomy. J Trauma 50(6):1165, 2001

Publications

Besselink MG, Berende NC, Preshaw RM, Romano C, Kortbeek J. Non-operative treatment ofduodenal perforation secondary to blunt abdominal trauma. Injury 32(6):513-15, 2001.

Kortbeek J. Trauma systems: A review of trauma systems using the Calgary model. CJS43(1):23-28, 2000

Chapters

Edward D. Chan, John B. Kortbeek, Lance S. Terrata, and Brent W. Winston. Bedside CriticalCare Manual. Second Edition. Hanley and Belfus, Inc., Philadelphia, PA. 2001. In press

Submitted/In Press

Dunham M, Hofer, E, Nichols S, Moore R, Kortbeek J. Endovascular stenting for blunt aorticinjury: A tale of two cities. Submitted to J Trauma

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Regional Trauma Services Annual Report 102000/2001

Goldstein, L, Doig C, Bates S, Rink S, Kortbeek J. Adopting the prehospital index forinterfacility helicopter transport: A proposal. Submitted to Injury

RICHARD E. BUCKLEY

Grants

AO International DVT Study, 1998, $20,000.00 US, 2000, $20,000 U.S., 2001.Pharmacia Upjohn/Searle, $120,000.00, 2001Pharmacia Upjohn/Searle, $120,000.00, 2002.

Publications

• R. McCormack, R. Buckley, D. Brien, M. McKee, J. Powell, E. Schemitsch. Fixation offractures of the shaft of the humerus by dynamic compression plate or intramedullary nail: Aprospective randomized trial. Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery, Vol. 82B, pages 336-339,2000

• T. Tufescu, R. Buckley. Age, gender, work capability, and Workers Compensation in patientswith displaced intra-articular calcaneal fractures. Journal of Orthopaedic Trauma, Vol. 15,pp.275-279, 2001

• D. Longino, R. Buckley. Bone graft in the operative treatment of displaced intra-articularcalcaneal fractures: Is it helpful? Journal of Orthopaedic Trauma, Vol. 15, pp. 280-286, 2001

• M. Csizy, R. Buckley, C. Fennell. Benign calcaneal bone cyst and pathologic fracture-surgicaltreatment with injectable calcium-phosphate bone cement (Norian®): A case report. Foot andAnkle International, Vol. 22, No 6, pp 507-510, 2001

Projects in Publication

• Prospective randomized controlled multi-centre clinical trial: operative vs nonoperativetreatment of displaced intra-articular calcaneal fractures - A 2-8 year follow-up. Co-authors:Dr. Suzanne Tough, Dr. B. McCormack, Dr. G. Pate, Dr. R. Leighton, Dr. D. Petrie, Dr. Galpin.Accepted by the American Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery

• Long-term ct results in calcaneal fractures treated operatively and nonoperatively. Co-authors: Dr. Phil Aubin, Dr. Doug Connell. Submitted to Journal of Orthopaedic Trauma

• Multi-centre clinical trial: New, symphysial plate for pelvic diastases. Co-authors: Dr. RossLeighton, Dr. Jim Powell

• Comparison of experiences of observers looking at distal radial fracture healing patterns. Co-authors: Dr. Jim Powell, Dr. Eli Olschewski, Dr. Paraic Murray

• Invited article: Calcaneal fractures: Do we operate on all, some or none? American Academyof Orthopaedic Surgery Journal. Co-author: Dr. Suzanne Tough

• Displaced intra-articular calcaneal fractures: who fails treatment and needs a subtalar fusion.Co-authors: Dr. Marcel Csizy, Mr. Jason Smith, Dr. Suzanne Tough, Dr. Bob McCormack, Dr.Graham Pate, Dr. Ross Leighton, Dr. Dave Petrie, Dr. Robert Galpin. Accepted by theJournal of Orthopaedic Trauma

• Patients lost to follow-up: Why? A critique of a prospective trauma data base. Co-author: M.Lucas Murnaghan. Accepted by the Canadian Journal of Surgery

Projects in Progress

• Multi-Centre Clinical Trial Reamed Versus Unreamed Femoral Nailing. Co-authors: Dr. JimPowell, Dr. Russ de Groote, Canadian Orthopedic Trauma Society (COTS)

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• Prophylaxis of Deep Vein Thrombosis in Patients with Fractures of the Lower Extremity Distalto the Knee. Co-authors: Dr. Gwen deVries, Dr. Greg Abelseth, Dr. Jim Powell, Dr. BryceCowan, COTS

• Randomized Controlled Study of Novos (TM) Putty Versus Standard Treatment for OpenTibial Fractures. Co-authors: Dr. Mike McKee, COTS

• Tibial Malrotation Study - Postoperative CT Correlates with Clinical Presentation. Co-authors:Dr. Shannon Puloski, Dr. Jim Powell, Dr. Bart Allende

• Multicentre Clinical Trial - Ring Fixator Versus Standard ORIF of Severely Displaced TibialPlateau Fractures. Co-authors: Dr. Shafique Pirani, COTS

• The Female Calcaneal Fracture. Co-authors: Dr. Jorge Barl, COTS• Prospective Gait Analysis of Calcaneal Fracture Patients: A Natural History. Co-author: Dr.

Jason O'Brien• Osteosynthesis of Fractures of the Patella, Prospective Randomized Trial, Suture vs. Wire.

Co-author: Dr. Seth Bitting• Displaced Intra-articular Calcaneal Fractures and Correlation's between Range of motion and

Outcome. Co-authors: Dr. Nigel Willis and Stephen Kingwell• Displaced Intra-articular Calcaneal Fractures and Correlations with Outcome for Bilateral Heel

Fractures. Co-authors: Mr. Paul Dooley, COTS• αBSM in Calcaneal Fractures. Co-author: COTS• Complications in Calcaneal Fractures. Co-authors: Jamie Howard, COTS• αBSM in Distal Radial Fractures. Co-authors: Dr. Vaughan Bowen, COTS

Presentations:

• Podium Presentation: Displaced Intra-articular Calcaneal Fractures: Who Fails Treatmentand Needs Subtalar Fusion? Canadian Orthopaedic Association Meeting, Edmonton, June 4,2000

• Podium Presentation (Jim Dr. Powell): A prospective randomized trial comparing reamed andunreamed intra-medullary nailing: Analysis of rates of union. COTS/COA meeting EdmontonJune 4, 2000

• OTA update Course, Calgary, Alberta, July 15, 2000 - The latest in calcaneal fractures• OTA update Course, Calgary, Alberta, July 15, 2000 - Proximal humeral fractures: An update• Podium Presentation: Prospective randomized multi-centre canadian clinical trial: Operative

vs. non-operative treatment of displaced intra-articular calcaneal fractures. OTA Meeting, SanAntonio, Texas, October 14, 2000

• Podium Presentation: Displaced intra-articular calcaneal fractures: Who fails treatment andneeds subtalar fusion. OTA, San Antonio, Texas, October 14, 2000

• Abstract (Dr. Jim Powell): Prospective randomized trial comparing reamed and unreamedintramedullary nailing: analysis of pulmonary complications. COT/OTA Meeting, San Antonio,October 13, 2000

• Basic Course Lecture: Absolute fracture stability. AO Course, Toronto, Ontario, November16, 2000

• Advanced Course Lecture: The side for unreamed femoral nails. AO Course Toronto,Ontario, November 16, 2000,

• Acute infection. AO Course Toronto, Canada, November 19, 2000• Calcaneal fracture treatment/subtalar fusions and randomized prospective trial discussion.

Nottingham Fracture Forum, Nottingham, England, November 22, 2000• How to do a fireside discussion. AO Course Davos Switzerland, December 10, 2000• Ankle fractures. AO Course Davos Switzerland, December 13, 2000• Your fractures and my fractures. Emergency Medicine Conference for Rural Physicians,

Banff, January 20, 2001

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Regional Trauma Services Annual Report 122000/2001

• What rural GPs do well: An orthopaedic trauma surgeon's perspective. Emergency MedicineConference for Rural Physicians, Banff, January 20, 2001

• Fracture healing and my philosophy: An orthopaedic trauma surgeon's prospective.Canadian Orthopaedic Technician Conference, Rockyview General Hospital, February17,2001

• Podium Presentation: Prospective randomized multi-centre Canadian clinical trial - Operativevs. non-operative treatment of displaced intra-articular calcaneal fractures. AAOS Meeting,San Francisco, California, March 3, Highlight Paper and Winner of "Bovill Award”

• Podium Presentation: Fractures associated with vascular complications. New ZealandOrthopaedic Association Meeting, Christchurch, New Zealand, March 29, 2001

• Podium Presentation: Subtrochanteric fractures. New Zealand Orthopaedic AssociationMeeting, Christchurch, New Zealand, March 29, 2001

• Podium Presentation: Calcaneal fractures - Who should have surgery and who should not?New Zealand Orthopaedic Association Meeting, Christchurch, New Zealand, March 30, 2001.

• Podium Presentation: Elbow fracture dislocations. New Zealand Orthopaedic AssociationMeeting, Christchurch, New Zealand, March 30, 2001.

DR. GARNETTE R. SUTHERLAND

Intraoperative Magnetic Resonance Research Program 1995 -(Innovative Magnetic Resonance Imaging Systems [IMRIS]; BrainLAB;

Marconi Medical Systems; Magnex Scientific UK; Surrey Medical ImagingSystems UK; National Research Council Canada; Foothills Medical Centre, U of Calgary

Grants

Medical Research Council of Canada $ 382,7581998-01

(Operating Grant)Metabolic basis and motor syndrome of pyridoxine sensory neuropathy. A combined NMRspectroscopic chromatographic, electrophysiological and behavioural studywith M. Hulliger, D.P. Archer

Heart & Stroke Foundation of Alberta & NWT $ 153,0001999-02

(Operating Grant)Metabolism and the Ischemic Brain: New Perspectives

Alberta Foundation for Health Research $ 500,0001999-01

(Operating Grant - Southern Alberta Stroke Program)A Window on the Brainwith T.E. Feasby, W.J. Becker, A.M. Buchan

Canadian Foundation for Innovation $4,720,0001999-2003

(Infrastructure Support)Seaman Family MR Research Centre

Medical Research Council of Canada $174,0001999-2003

(Operating Grant)Metabolism and the Ischemic Brain: New Perspectives

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Regional Trauma Services Annual Report 132000/2001

Abstracts

Hamilton MG, Vecil J, Kaibara T, Sutherland GR. The successful integration of framelessstereotaxy with the mobile 1.5-Tesla intraoperative MR imaging system. 34th Meeting of theCanadian Congress of Neurological Sciences, Ottawa, Ontario, June 13-17, 2000

Dumont AS, Verna S, Lovren F, Sutherland GR, McNeill JH, Triggle CR, Anderson TJ. Novelendothelial protective effects of endothelin antagonism in human saphenous veins: Implicationsfor cerebral revascularization. Congress of Neurological Surgeons Annual Meeting 50th

Anniversary Celebration, San Antonio, Texas, September 23-28, 2000

Dumont AS, Verna S, Kaibara T, Sutherland GR. The neurosurgical legacy of Charles G.Drake, M.D. Congress of Neurological Surgeons Annual Meeting 50th Anniversary Celebration,San Antonio, Texas, September 23-28, 2000

McTaggart Cowan RA, Falkenstein R, Archer DP, Wallace CJ, Sutherland GR. The impact ofmobile intraoperative MRI on anesthetic care. American Society of Anesthetists, San Francisco,California, October 13-18, 2000

Kaibara T, Myles ST, Sutherland GR. Epilepsy surgery guided by high field intraoperative MRimaging. The 59th Annual Meeting of the Japan Neurosurgical Society, Fukuoka, Japan,October 24-28, 2000

Kaibara T, Dort J, Sutherland GR. Skull base surgery augmented by mobile 1.5Teslaintraoperative MR imaging. The 59th Annual Meeting of the Japan Neurosurgical Society,Fukuoka, Japan, October 24-28, 2000

Kaibara T, Sutherland GR. Surgical navigation with high field intraoperative MR imaging. The59th Annual Meeting of the Japan Neurosurgical Society, Fukuoka, Japan, October 24-28, 2000

Kaibara T, Dumont AS, Sutherland GR. Resection of vascular malformations monitored by highfield intraoperative MR: Initial experience. The 4th Annual Meeting of the AANS/CNS and TheFirst American-Japanese Meeting for Surgical and Endovascular Treatment of CerebrovascularDisorders, Hawaii, February 9-12, 2001

Publications

Louw DF, Yang FW, Sutherland GR. The Effect of Delta-9-Tetrahydrocannabinol on forebrainischemia in rat. Brain Research 857:183-187, 2000

Perron JT, Tyson RL, Sutherland GR. Maintenance of TCA cycle kinetics in Brown-NorwayFischer 344 rats may translate to longevity. Neurosci Lett 281:91-94, 2000

Sutherland GR, Perron JT, Kozlowski P., McCarthy DJ. AR-R15896AR reduces cerebral infarctvolume following focal ischemia in cat. Neurosurg 46:710-720, 2000

Tyson RL, Perron J, Sutherland GR. 6-Aminonicotinamide inhibition of the pentose phosphatepathway in rat neocortex. Neuro Report II(9): 1845-1848, 2000

Kaibara T, Saunders JK, Sutherland GR. Advances in mobile intraoperative MR imaging.Neurosurg 47:131-138, 2000

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Regional Trauma Services Annual Report 142000/2001

Hoult DI, Saunders JK, Sutherland GR, Sharp J, Gervin M, Kolansky HG, Kripiakevich DL,Procca A, Sebastian RA, Dombay A, Rayner DL, Roberts FA, Tomanek B. The engineering ofan interventional MRI with a movable 1.5Tesla magnet. J Magn Reson Imaging 13:78-86 2001

Dumont AS, Lovren F, McNeill JH, Sutherland GR, Triggle CR, Anderson TJ, Verma S.Augmentation of endothelial function by endothelin antagonism in human saphenous veinconduits. J Neurosurg 94:281-286, 2001

Kaibara T, Hurlbert RJ, Sutherland GR. Intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging –Augmented transoral resection of axial disease. Neurosurg Focus 10 (2):Article 4, 2001

Barber PA, Auer RN, Buchan AM, Sutherland GR. Understanding and managing ischemicstroke. Can J Physiol Pharmacol 79 (3):283-296, 2001

Submitted/In Press

Dumont AS, Hyndman ME, Dumont RJ, Fedak PM, Kassell NF, Sutherland GR, Verma S.Pravastatin improves endothelial function in insulin resistant carotid arteries. (In Press: JNeurosurg 2001)

Dort JC, Sutherland GR. Intraoperative MR Imaging for Skull Base Surgery. (In Press: TheLaryngoscope 2001)

Louw DF, Asfora WT, Sutherland GR. A Brief History of Aneurysm Clips. (In Press: NeurosurgFocus 2001)

Kaibara T, Hurlbert RJ, Sutherland GR. Trans-Oral resection of axis pathology augmented byintraoperative MR imaging. (In Press: J Neurosurg:Spine October 2001)

Dumont AS, Verma S, Hurlbert RJ, Sutherland GR. Thrombeombolic stroke secondary to blunttraumatic cardiac injury. (Submitted: J Neurosurg 2001)

Dumont AS, Dumont RJ, McNeill JH, Kassell NF, Sutherland GR, Stewart DJ, Verma S.Chronic endothelin antagonism restores myogenic tone, endothelium-dependent vasomotionand responsiveness to a KATP channel opener in cerebral arteries of diabetic rats. (SubmittedNeurosurg 2001)

Dumont AS, Dumont RJ, Kassell NF, Sutherland GR, Verma S. Endothelin and cerebralvasospasm in hypertension. (Submitted: AHA Journal 2001)

Kaibara T, Myles ST, Lee MA, Sutherland GR. Optimizing epilepsy surgery with intraoperativeMR imaging. (Submitted Epilepsia 2001)

Darsaut TE, Tyson RL, Sutherland GR. Acute changes in cerebral glucose metabolism inducedby phenazine methosulfate and methylene blue. (Submitted J Neurochem 2001)

Archer DP, Cowan RAMcT, Falkenstein RJ, Wallace CJ, Kaibara T, Sutherland GR. Acontrolled study of intraoperative mobile, high field magnetic resonance imaging for craniotomy.(Submitted Can J Anaesth 2001)

Sutherland GR, Kaibara T, Wallace C, Tomanek B, Richter M. Intraoperative assessment ofaneurysm clipping using MR angiography and diffusion weighted imaging. (Submitted:Neurosurg 2001)

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Regional Trauma Services Annual Report 152000/2001

Tyson RL, Sutherland GR. Regional pyruvate carboxylase activity measured using NMRspectroscopy-detected [1-13C] glucose metabolism. (Submitted: J Cereb Blood Flow Metab2001)

Book Chapters

Auer RN, Sutherland GR. Hypoxic Brain Damage. DI Graham and PL Lantos. Editors.Greenfield’s Neuropathology Seventh Edition. Edward Arnold (Publishers) Limited. (In Press2001)

Sutherland GR. C Truit, Editor. Neuroimaging Clinics in North America. NeurosurgeryOperating Room in the 21st Century. (In Press 2001)

Presentations

Advances and Clinical Experiences with Mobile Intraoperative MR Imaging at 1.5Tesla. WaltonNeurosurgical Institute, Liverpool, UK, May 31, 2000

University of Birmingham, Queen Elizabeth Hospital. Advances and Clinical Experiences withMobile Intraoperative MR Imaging at 1.5 Tesla. Birmingham, UK, June 2, 2000

Advances in Mobile Intraoperative MR Imaging (IMRIS 1.5T, iMotion). XIV Congress EuropeanSociety for Stereotactic and Functional Neurosurgery, London, UK, October 25, 2000

Neurosurgery in the 21st Century: Intraoperative MRI. 5th Detroit Neurosurgery Symposium,Detroit, Michigan, November 4, 2000

Neurosurgical Operating Room of the 21st Century. 8th Annual Banff Conference, Banff, Alberta,February 2-3 2001

BRENT W. WINSTON

Grants

• Alberta Heritage Foundation For Medical Research Establishment and Clinical InvestigatorGrant - 3 year Grant awarded 1996, renewed 1999

• Research in Excellence - Alberta Government one time award- $28,000• Medical Research Council of Canada Scholarship - 5 yr Award starting 1996.• Medical Research Council of Canada Operating Grant - 3 year Grant awarded 1996,

renewed 1999.• Alberta Lung Association - 1 year award, 1998, 1 year renewal, 1999-2000.• Centeon – 1 year award 1999-2000.• University of Calgary, Ruth Rannie Memorial Endowment Award – 1 year award, 2000-2001.• Canadian Intensive Care Foundation – 1 year award, 1999-2000.• Regional ICU Department Grant – 1 year award, 2000-2001.• Medical Services Incorporated Grant – 2 year award.• Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada, Alberta Chapter – 1 year grant

Co Investigator Industry Sponsored:

Chiron Pharmaceuticals. OPTIMIST Trial – Phase III TFPI in Severe Sepsis.$396,000 to date

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Regional Trauma Services Annual Report 162000/2001

Invited Lecturer to Critical Care Fellows Seminars, University of Toronto, Nov, 2000

Invited Speaker to the Respirology Research in Progress, University of Toronto, November2000

Invited speaker, University of Manitoba, Division of Critical Care Medicine, January 25-26, 2001.Two presentations entitled: 1) “Cell and molecular aspects of sepsis: targeted therapy” and 2)“Factor B induction in septic shock.”

Oral presentation at the Annual Meeting of the American Society of Critical Care Medicine, Feb.11, 2001, Moscone Center, San Francisco, CA. Presentation entitled “IGF-I is upregulated infibroproliferative ARDS.”

Invited speaker at the Western Canadian Critical Care Course, March 28, 2001, Banff ParkLodge, Banff, Alberta. Presentation entitled “ATIII in human-based studies.”

Abstracts

Connie Mowat, Sabine Bisson, Stephen Robbins and, Brent W. Winston. TNFα stimulatesMEKK1 translocation into lipid rafts (or low density membrane microdomains, LDMC’s) inmacrophages. Am. J. Resp. and Crit. Care Med. Vol. 161 (3), 2000, pp A455

Yong Huang, Peter M. Krein and Brent W. Winston. Regulation of complement factor B by IFNγand TNFα in macrophages. Am. J. Resp. and Crit. Care Med. Vol. 161 (3), 2000, pp A535

B. W. Winston, W. Tinmouth, G. Gelfand, S. McFadden; R. Brisebois, and F. H. Y. Green.Insulin–like growth factor-I (IGF-I) is expressed in human lung tissue in fibroproliferative ARDS.Am. J. Resp. and Crit. Care Med. Vol. 161 (3), 2000, pp A95

Connie Mowat, Sabine Bisson, Stephen Robbins and, Brent W. Winston. TNFα stimulatesMEKK1 activation in lipid rafts (or low density membrane microdomains, LDMC’s). Oralpresentation at the CSCI and RCPS Annual Meeting September 2000

Brent W. Winston, P. M. Krein, P Sabatini, W. Tinmouth, R. Brisebois, C. Doig, and F. Green.IGF-I is upregulated in fibroproliferative ARDS. Oral presentation at the Annual Meeting of theSociety of Critical Care Medicine, February, 2001

Brent W. Winston, Yong Huang and Peter M. Krein. Regulation of complement factor B by IFNγand TNFα in mouse and human mononuclear cells. Am. J. Resp. and Crit. Care Med. Vol. 163(5), 2001, ppA553

Brent W. Winston, P.M. Krein, P. Sabatini, W. Tinmouth, G. Gelfand, S. McFadden, R. Brisbois,C. Doig and F.H.Y. Green. Retrospective and prospective analysis of IGF-I induction inpersistent ARDS. Am. J. Resp. and Crit. Care Med. Vol. 163 (5), 2001, pp A140

Yong Huang, Peter M. Krein, and Brent W. Winston. Mapping the synergistic effects of TNFα-and IFNγ-stimulated induction of complement factor B in macrophages. Presented at theAnnual Meeting of the Canadian Society for Immunology Meeting, March 2001

Connie Mowat, Sabine Bisson, Stephen Robbins and, Brent W. Winston. TNFα stimulation andactivation of MEKK1 and Caspase 8 in lipid rafts. Presented at the Annual Meeting of theCanadian Society for Immunology meeting, March 2001

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Publications

Yong Huang, Tiliang Deng and Brent W. Winston. Identification and Characterization of aTranscriptional and Splicing Factor Phosphorylation Kinase. Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun.,2000, 271(2), pp 456-463.

Peter M. Krein, Yong Huang and Brent W. Winston. Growth Factor regulation and Manipulationin wound repair: To scar or not to scar, that is the question. Expert. Opin. Ther. Patents, 2001,Vol. 11(7):1065-1079.

Submitted/In Press

David Zygun, Ian Anderson, Kevin Laupland, Andreas Kramer, Christopher Doig and Brent W.Winston. Update in critical care medicine in the new millennium. Royal College Annals, 2001 inPress.

Yong Huang, Peter M. Krein, and Brent W. Winston. Characterization of IFNγ regulation of thecomplement factor B gene in macrophages. Submitted to the European Journal of Immunologyfor Publication.

Yong Huang, Peter M. Krein, and Brent W. Winston. Complement factor B gene regulation:Synergistic effects of TNFα and IFNγ in macrophages. Submitted to the Journal of Immunologyfor publication.

Peter M. Krein, Peter Sabatini, William Tinmouth, Francis Green, and Brent Winston. IGF-Iimmunoreactivity is increased in the lungs of patients with fibroproliferative ARDS. Submitted tothe American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

Chapters

Edward D. Chan, John B. Kortbeek, Lance S. Terrata, and Brent W. Winston. Bedside CriticalCare Manual. Second Edition. Hanley and Belfus, Inc., Philadelphia, PA. 2001, In Press.

R. JOHN HURLBERT

Publications

Hurlbert RJ. Methylprednisolone for acute spinal cord injury: An inappropriate standard of care.J Neurosurg (Spine 1) 93:1-7, 2000

Ziai, W.C., Hurlbert, RJ. A six year review of odontoid fractures: The emerging role of surgicalintervention. Can J Neurol Sci 27:297-301, 2000

Hurlbert, RJ. Surgical Site Complications Associated with a Morphine Nerve Paste used forPost-operative Pain Control after Laminectomy (letter). Infec Control Hosp Epidemiol 21:5,2000

Hurlbert, RJ. The use of methylprednisolone (letter). J Neurosurg (Spine 1) 93:340-341, 2000

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In Preparation

Vecil GG, Hurlbert RJ. Modified Brooks posterior wiring technique with transarticular screws forcomplex atlanto-axial instability

Kaibara T, Hurlbert RJ. Anterior cervical fixation and load sharing: superior fusion results

Dumont A., Theodore N, Sonntag, VKHS, Hurlbert RJ. Long-term follow-up of post-operativepain control with a morphine based analgesic paste

Presentations

Role of Steroids in Neurological Injury. Orthopedic Trauma Association – Trauma Managementand Controversies, Calgary, AB, July 14-16, 2000

Indications and Techniques for Decompression in Spinal Surgery. Orthopedic TraumaAssociation – Trauma Management and Controversies, Calgary, AB, July 14-16, 2000

Anatomical and Biomechanical Considerations in Cervical Spine Instability. Course Lecture:PC10 Cervical Spine Stabilization. Congress of Neurological Surgeons Annual Meeting, SanAntonio, TX, September 23-28, 2000

Thoracic Endoscopic Vertebrectomy. Course Lecture: PC10 Cervical Spine Stabilization.Congress of Neurological Surgeons Annual Meeting, San Antonio, TX, September 23-28, 2000

Role of Pharmacotherapy in Acute Spinal Cord Injury. Congress of Neurological SurgeonsAnnual Meeting, San Antonio, TX, September 23-28, 2000

The Cervical Spine 360. Instability of the Subaxial Cervical Spine: Current Concepts inManagement. Congress of Neurological Surgeons Annual Meeting, San Antonio, TX,September 23-28, 2000

Posterior Cervical Anatomy and Techniques of Instrumentation: Second Annual WesternCanada Spine Course, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, October 27-29,2000

Combined Anterior and Posterior Cervical Approaches: Second Annual Western Canada SpineCourse, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, October 27-29, 2000

Vertebral osteoporosis: the aging spine. A Contemporary Review of Disorders of the Spine,University of Florida, Whistler, BC, January 7-12, 2001

High dose methylprednisolone in spinal cord injury. Invited speaker. Interior BC Winter SpineMeeting. Vernon, BC, February 23-24, 2001

Anterior cervical fusion for cervical disc disease – is fusion necessary? Interior BC Winter SpineMeeting. Vernon, BC, February 23-24, 2001

with Thng P, Hamilton M. Adult Tethered Cord Syndrome. 1st Annual Meeting of the CanadianSpine Society. Mont Tremblant, Quebec, March 22-24, 2001

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JAMES N. POWELL

Publications

McCormack RG, Brien D, Buckley RE, McKee MD, Powell J, Schemitsch EH. Fixation offractures of the shaft of the humerus by dynamic compression plate or intramedullary nail. JBone Joint Surg (Br) 2000; 82-B:336-9

J. DEAN SANDHAM

Liquivent in ARDS, April 2000

ROBERT HARROP

Harrop, R. Indian status as a risk factor for injury mortality in Alberta. Conference on InjuryPrevention and Control, October, 2000

5. ADMINISTRATION

This year’s activities included:

• change in Regional Trauma Services personnel – Jane Bartlett assumed manager role inJuly 2000

• continued participation in the development of the ACICR proposal for a provincial traumanetwork

• completion of initial phase of formation of Trauma Coordinators of Canada• Trauma Coordinators Of Canada Managerial Meeting May 2000 in Halifax, NS• maintaining links to Province Wide Services• maintaining links to Trauma Program in Edmonton• supporting the implementation of the DI Picture Archiving And Communication System

(PACS) on unit 71 and the emergency department at FMC

Human Resources Activities:

• successful recruitment of a part-time data analyst (FMC & ACH) and part-time pediatrictrauma coordinator at ACH

Committee Representation:

Calgary Health Region:• HOPE Advisory Committee• Regional Injury Control Executive Committee, CHR• Peter Lougheed Centre Trauma Committee• Rockyview Hospital Trauma Committee• Foothills Medical Centre Adult Trauma Care Committee• Foothills Medical Centre Trauma Resuscitation Committee• Trauma Update Organizational Committee• The University of Calgary Surgical Undergraduate Education Committee• The University of Calgary, Critical Care Fellowship Steering Committee• Trauma Quality Improvement, FMC• Trauma Audit Committee, ACH

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Regional Trauma Services Annual Report 202000/2001

• Regional Trauma Executive• Emergency Managers Committee• Patient Care Managers Committee• PARTY Advisory Committee• Site Managers Group• FMC Disaster and Emergency Response Planning Committee• ACCN Provincial Advisory Committee• Calgary Injury Prevention Coalition Communications Committee• Canadian Intensive Care Foundation, Golf for Life Organizing Committee• ICU Executive Committee• ICU Quality Council Committee• ICU Research Committee• ICU CQI

Provincial:• Advisory Trauma Provincial Working Group, Alberta Centre for Injury Control Research• Alberta Ambulance Medical Review Committee• American College of Surgeons, Alberta Chapter• Alberta Ambulance Advisory and Appeal Board

National:• Trauma Association of Canada Executive Committee• Trauma Association of Canada Abstract Review Panel• Royal College of Physicians & Surgeons of Canada Corresponding Member, Test

Committee for General Surgery• Trauma Coordinators of Canada

International:• American College of Surgeons, Alberta Chapter• American College of Surgeons ATLS® Subcommittee• American College of Surgeons

• Committee on Trauma• Editorial Review Panel, Journal of Trauma• Editorial Board, INJURY

Regional/Provincial/National Liaisons:

Trauma Services continues to be involved with prevention, acute care and rehabilitationactivities and groups both within and outside the Calgary Health Region.

• PARTY program – participate regularly in PARTY presentations (annual report availablefrom Lynda Vowell)

• Provincial Trauma System• liaison continues within the ACICR• trauma managers, coordinators and data analysts meet regularly to ensure consistency with

the Alberta Trauma Registry (ATR) and provide a forum to review and plan trauma activities• liaison with educational centres has continued – i.e., member of Mount Royal College Adult

Critical Care Nursing Advisory Council• Emergency Nurses Interest Group• Emergency Nurses Association

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6. DATA MANAGEMENT:

Data collection and management continues to be an integral component of the RegionalTrauma Services program.

The management of data gathered at both the Foothills Medical Centre and the AlbertaChildren's Hospital provides the basis for the Alberta Trauma Registry, and is a cornerstone forregional system operations and quality improvement initiatives. This data also supports thework being done towards the establishment of a provincial trauma network.

Collection of data from the Peter Lougheed Centre and Rockyview Hospital is accomplishedthrough chart review. Specific charts are reviewed based on injury discharge data and/oridentification of major trauma patients by staff at those two sites.

The following summarizes the injury data for the fiscal year April 1, 2000 – March 31, 2001 atthe four acute care sites within the CHR:

Monthly Discharges* ISS> 12

FMC 2736 679

ACH 713 79

PLC 1035 55

RGH 1431 40

Total 5915 853*based on injury discharge codes

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Performance Indicators

Foothills Medical Centre

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PERFORMANCE INDICATORS

As part of Regional Trauma Services quality improvement process, several indicatorsthroughout the continuum of care are monitored on a regular basis as a measure ofperformance. Some of the indicators stem from audit filters set out by the American College ofSurgeons’ Committee on Trauma. Other indicators were developed at the FMC and the ACH assite specific performance indicators. The following is a summary of these indicators for the FMCfor patients who meet the inclusion criteria for the Alberta Trauma Registry (patients with an ISS>/= 12 and who are admitted to the hospital or die in the emergency department at the FMC).

PREHOSPITAL

Known Transport Time by Calgary EMS

Time spent transporting patient to trauma centre, direct from scene, by Calgary EMS(responder):

Yes = Transport time is known (time responder left scene and time responder arrived attrauma centre);No = Transport time is unknown (time responder left scene and / or time responder arrivedat trauma centre).

• Minimum - Time spent transporting patient to trauma centre by Calgary EMS (responder)where transport time is known (time responder left scene and time responder arrived attrauma centre).

• Maximum - Time spent transporting patient to trauma centre by Calgary EMS (responder)where transport time is known (time responder left scene and time responder arrived attrauma centre).

• Average - Time spent transporting patient to trauma centre by Calgary EMS (responder)where transport time is known (time responder left scene and time responder arrived attrauma centre).

Note: Transport time information provided by Calgary EMS.

n=222Indicator Yes % Yes No % NoCalgary EMS timedocumentation• Minimum• Maximum• Average

183

2 minutes47 minutes16.6 minutes

82.4% 39 17.6%

Region of Injury Event When Direct from Scene by Ground Ambulance

Includes all patients transported direct from scene to trauma centre by ground ambulance withknown region of injury event (within region 4 and outside region 4):

Yes = Patients transported direct from scene to trauma centre by ground ambulance withknown region of injury event within Calgary Health Region (region 4);No = Patients transported direct from scene to trauma centre by ground ambulance withknown region of injury event outside Calgary Health Region (region 4).

n=240Indicator Yes % Yes No % NoDirect from scene byground ambulance

223 92.9%within region 4

17 7.1%outside region 4

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Region of Injury Event When Direct from Scene by STARS Air Ambulance(rotary wing)

Includes all patients transported direct from scene to trauma centre by STARS Air Ambulancewith known region of injury event (within region 4 and outside region 4). Ground EMS may beinvolved in patient care at scene but method of transport to trauma centre is by STARS AirAmbulance.

Yes = Patients transported direct from scene to trauma centre by STARS Air Ambulancewith known region of injury event within Calgary Health Region (region 4);No = Patients transported direct from scene to trauma centre by STARS Air Ambulance withknown region of injury event outside region 4.

n=52Indicator Yes % Yes No % NoDirect from scene byrotary wing (STARSAir Ambulance)

24 46.2%within region 4

28 53.8%outside region 4

GCS </= 8 at Scene With or Without Mechanical Airway

Includes all patients with first GCS </= 8 at scene recorded by medical personnel:Yes = Patients with first recorded GCS at scene </= 8 with mechanical airway asintervention at scene;No = Patients with first recorded GCS at scene </= 8 without mechanical airway asintervention at scene.

Mechanical airway includes intubation (nasal and oral), cricothyroidotomy and tracheostomy

Note: 146 patients excluded from analysis due to lack of GCS documentation at scene ormissing patient care record.

n=93Indicator Yes % Yes No % NoGCS </= 8 at scenewith mechanicalairway

41 44.1% 52 55.9%

GCS </= 8 at Trauma Centre

Includes all patients arriving at trauma centre regardless of GCS at scene:Yes = Patients with first recorded GCS at trauma centre </= 8;No = Patients with first recorded GCS at trauma centre >/= 8 or no documented GCS orarrived intubated.

n=679Indicator Yes % Yes No % NoGCS </= 8 on arrivalat trauma centre

21 3.1% 658* of this 149arrived attrauma centreintubated, 25had no GCSdocumentationand 484GCS>8 *

96.9%

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INTERFACILITY TRANSFER

Transfers from Within Region 4

Transfers from PLC to trauma centre (PLC may have been the primary or secondaryhospital).

• Total injury discharges from PLC for 2000/2001 – 1035• Includes all PLC ISS >/= 12:

Yes = ISS >/= 12 patients transferred to trauma centre;No = ISS >/= 12 patients not transferred to trauma centre.

n=55Indicator Yes % Yes No % NoPLC ISS >/= 12 16 29.1% 39 70.9%

Transfers from Within Region 4

Transfers from RGH to trauma centre (RGH may have been the primary or secondaryhospital).

• Total injury discharges from RGH for 2000/2001 – 1431• Includes all RGH ISS >/= 12:

Yes = ISS >/= 12 patients transferred to trauma centre;No = ISS >/= 12 patients not transferred to trauma centre.

n=40Indicator Yes % Yes No % NoRGH ISS >/= 12 16 40% 24 60%

Transfers from Within Region 4

Transfers from ACH trauma centre to FMC trauma centre (ACH may have been theprimary or secondary hospital).

• Total injury discharges from ACH for 2000/2001 – 713• Includes all ACH ISS >/= 12:

Yes = ISS >/= 12 patients transferred to trauma centre;No = ISS >/= 12 patients not transferred to trauma centre.

n=78Indicator Yes % Yes No % NoACH ISS >/= 12 4 5.1% 74 94.9%

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Transfers from Outside Region 4

Time Spent at Primary Hospital Prior to Transfer to Trauma Centre </= 2 Hours• Includes all patients transferred to trauma centre from primary hospital outside of Region 4

with a known length of stay (known arrival to primary hospital time and known departurefrom primary hospital time):

Yes = Patient spent </= 2 hours at primary hospital prior to transfer to trauma centre;No = Patient spent > 2 hours at primary hospital prior to transfer to trauma centre.

Note: 108 patients excluded from analysis due to unknown primary hospital length of stay

n=199Indicator Yes % Yes No % No</= 2 hours atPrimary Hospital

81 40.7% 118 59.3%

Transfers From Outside Region 4

Time spent at secondary hospital prior to transfer to trauma centre </= 2 hours• Includes all patients transferred to trauma centre from secondary hospital outside of Region

4 with a known length of stay (known arrival to secondary hospital time and knowndeparture from secondary hospital time):

Yes = Patient spent </= 2 hours at secondary hospital prior to transfer to trauma centre;No = Patient spent > 2 hours at secondary hospital prior to transfer to trauma centre.

Note: 8 patients excluded from analysis due to unknown secondary hospital LOS

n=13Indicator Yes % Yes No % No</= 2 hours atSecondaryHospital

3 23.1% 10 76.9%

Transfers From Outside Region 4

Injury Time to Trauma Centre < 4 hours• Includes all patients transferred from another hospital (outside region 4) with known time to

trauma centre (time of injury event and time of arrival to trauma centre):Yes = Patients with known time to trauma centre (time of injury event and time of arrivalto trauma centre) < 4 hours;No = Patients with known time to trauma centre (time of injury event and time of arrival totrauma centre) >/= 4 hours.

Note: 133 patients excluded from analysis due to unknown time of injury or unknown timeof arrival at trauma centre

n=168Indicator Yes % Yes No % NoInjury time totrauma centre < 4hours

42 25% 126 75%

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RESUSCITATIVE PHASE

Trauma Team Activations

Includes all patients with ISS >/= 12 who came through the trauma centre EmergencyDepartment (ED) (excludes direct admits):

Yes = Trauma Team was activated;No = Trauma Team was not activated.

Note: There were a total of 764 activations in 2000/2001. Activations often occur for majormechanism of injury where ISS is subsequently found to be less than 12.

n=642Indicator Yes % Yes No % NoTrauma TeamActivations

361 56.2% 281 43.8%

Trauma Team Leader Response Time </= 20 Minutes

Includes all patients where Trauma Team was activated and Trauma Team Leader time ofarrival known:

Yes = Trauma Team Leader response time </= 20 minutes;No = Trauma Team Leader response time exceeded 20 minutes.

Note: 50 Trauma Team activations excluded from analysis due to lack of time documentation

n=311Indicator Yes % Yes No % NoTrauma Team LeaderResponse </= 20minutes

303 97.4% 8 2.6%

GCS </= 8 at Trauma Centre And Mechanical Airway Intervention in EmergencyDepartment

Includes all patients with first recorded GCS </= 8 at trauma centre:Yes = Patient left trauma centre ED with a mechanical airway;No = Patient left trauma centre ED without a mechanical airway.

Note: Mechanical airway includes intubation (nasal and oral), cricothyroidotomy andtracheostomyNote: 25 patients excluded from analysis due to unknown GCS

n=21Indicator Yes % Yes No % NoGCS </= 8 on arrivalto ED with mechanicalairway

17 81% 4 19%

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Emergency Department Length of Stay </= 4 Hours

Includes all patients who came through the trauma centre ED with a known length of stay (timeof arrival to trauma centre ED and time of departure from trauma centre ED):

Yes = Patients with ED length of stay </= 4 hours;No = Patients with ED length of stay > 4 hours.

Note: 31 patients excluded from analysis due to unknown ED length of stay

n=611Indicator Yes % Yes No % NoED LOS </= 4 hours 322 52.7% 289 47.3%

DEFINITIVE CARE

Craniotomy for Acute Epidural or Subdural Hematoma Within 4 Hours of Arrival atTrauma Centre

Includes all patients who received a craniotomy at trauma centre:Yes = Patient craniotomy within 4 hours of arrival to trauma centre;No = Patient craniotomy > 4 hours after arrival to trauma centre.

n=38Indicator Yes % Yes No % NoCraniotomy within 4 hours ofarrival to trauma centre

34 89.5% 4 10.5%

Laparotomy at Trauma Centre

• Includes all patients requiring emergent laparotomy:Yes = Patient required emergent laparotomy, and laparotomy performed within 1 hour ofarrival to trauma centre;No = Patient required emergent laparotomy, and laparotomy not performed within 1 hour ofarrival to trauma centre.

n=46Indicator Yes % Yes No % No• Emergent laparotomy within

1 hour of arrival to traumacentre

17 37% 29 63%

Note: 57% (26) patients received laparotomy within 2 hours of arrival to trauma centre.

• Includes all hemodynamically unstable patients requiring laparotomy (BP<90 and/orpulse>130):Yes = Hemodynamically unstable patient required a laparotomy within 1 hour of arrival totrauma centre and laparotomy was performed within 1 hour of arrival to trauma centre;No = Hemodynamically unstable patient required a laparotomy within 1 hour of arrival totrauma centre and laparotomy was not performed within 1 hour of arrival to trauma centre.

n=1Indicator Yes % Yes No % No• hemodynamically unstable

patient with laparotomy1 100% 0 0%

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Therapeutic Laparotomy

Includes all patients who required a laparotomy. Therapeutic laparotomy is defined as discoveryof an injury which requires suturing and or packing:

Yes = Patient treated with therapeutic laparotomy;No = Patient treated with non-therapeutic laparotomy.

n=68Indicator Yes % Yes No % NoTherapeutic laparotomy 63 92.6% 5 7.4%

Gunshot Wound to Abdomen Managed Operatively

Includes all patients with gunshot wound to abdomen:Yes = Patient with gunshot wound to abdomen managed operatively;No = Patient with gunshot wound to abdomen managed non-operatively.

n=3Indicator Yes % Yes No % NoGSW to abdomen managedoperatively

3 100% 0 0%

Operative Management of Femur Fracture Within 24 hours of Admission

Includes all patients with operative management of femur fracture:Yes = Patient had operative management of femur fracture within 24 hours of admission totrauma centre;No = Patient had operative management of femur fracture not within 24 hours of admissionto trauma centre.

Note: In some trauma patients with major head or truncal injury, physiological status requireddelay of femur fracture repair. These patients have been excluded.

n=36Indicator Yes % Yes No % NoOperative management of femurfracture within 24 hours of arrivalto trauma centre

32 88.9% 4 11.1%

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Operative Management of Open Fracture Within 6 Hours (Grade III) or 12 Hours(Grade I, II)

Includes all patients with open long bone fracture (radius, ulna, humerus, tibia, fibula, femur):Yes = Patient with open long bone fracture had operative management performed within 6hours for grade III; 12 hours for grade I or II after arrival to trauma centre;No = Patient with open long bone fracture did not have operative management performedwithin 6 hours for grade III; 12 hours for grade I or II after arrival to trauma centre.

Note: Time to repair for grade I, II, III open fractures based on Practice Guidelines – OrthopedicTrauma Group, FMC

n=51Indicator Yes % Yes No % NoOperative management of openfracture within 6 hours (grade III)or 12 hours (grade I, II)

47 92.2% 4 7.8%

Unplanned Return to Operating Room

Includes all patients with at least 1 visit to operating room:Yes = Patient had unplanned return to operating room;No = Patient did not have unplanned return to operating room.

n=362Indicator Yes % Yes No % NoUnplanned return to operatingroom

3 0.8% 359 99.2%

Admitting Physician Was Surgeon or Intensivist

Includes all patients admitted to trauma centre (not including emergency department deaths oroperating room deaths that were not admitted):

Yes = Patient admitted to surgeon or intensivist;No = Patient admitted to physician other than surgeon or intensivist.

n=663Indicator Yes % Yes No % NoAdmitting physician surgeon orintensivist

652 98.3% 11 1.7%

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Delayed Diagnosis (> 48 hours post admission) or Missed Injury

Includes all patients admitted to trauma centre (not including emergency department deaths,operating room deaths that were not admitted):

Yes = Patient with delayed diagnosis or missed injury during hospitalization at traumacentre;No = Patient without delayed diagnosis or missed injury during hospitalization at traumacentre.

n=664Indicator Yes % Yes No % NoDelayed diagnosis or missedinjury

35 5.3% 629 94.7%

Missed C-Spine Injury

Includes all patients admitted to trauma centre (not including emergency department deaths,operating room deaths that were not admitted):

Yes = Patient with missed c-spine injury within the first 48 hours of admission to traumacentre and spinal precautions removed;No = Patient with no missed c-spine injury indicated within the first 48 hours of admission totrauma centre.

Note: 61 patients had c-spine injuries

n=664Indicator Yes % Yes No % NoMissed c-spine injury 2 0.3% 662 99.7%

Unplanned ICU Admission

Includes all patients admitted to trauma centre (not including emergency departments deaths,operating room deaths that were not admitted):

Yes = Patients with unplanned admission to ICU (admitted to ICU from other patient careunit);No = Patient without unplanned ICU admission.

n=664Indicator Yes % Yes No % NoUnplanned ICU admission 4 0.6% 660 99.4%

Unplanned ICU Readmission

Includes all patients admitted to ICU:Yes = Patient with unplanned ICU re-admission;No = Patient without unplanned ICU re-admission.

n=235Indicator Yes % Yes No % NoUnplanned ICU re-admission 9 3.8% 226 96.2%

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OUTCOME

Death During Transport

Includes all patients arriving at trauma centre:Yes = Patient was declared dead on arrival by emergency department physician;No = Patient did not die during transport.

n=679Indicator Yes % Yes No % NoDeath during transport 0 0% 679 100%

Death During First 24 Hours of Admission

Includes all patients who died:Yes = Patient died within first 24 hours of admission;No = Patient did not die within first 24 hours of admission.

n=81Indicator Yes % Yes No % NoDeath within first 24 hoursof admission

36 44.4% 45 55.6%

Outcome and Probability of Survival

Includes all patients with TRISS valued and probability of survival > 20%:Yes = Patient died with probability of survival > 20%;No = Patient did not die with probability of survival > 20%.

n=467Indicator Yes % Yes No % NoDeath and probability ofsurvival > 20%

13 2.8% 454 97.2%

Mortality

Includes all patients arriving at trauma centre:Yes = Patient died;No = Patient did not die.

n=679Indicator Yes % Yes No % NoMortality 81 11.9% 598 88.1%

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TRISS Methodology

The TRISS methodology uses logistic regression to predict survival based on the RevisedTrauma Score (RTS), injury severity score (ISS), mechanism of injury (blunt vs. penetrating)and patient age. Unexpected deaths are trauma patients with a predicted probability of survival(TRISS) of 0.5 or more that die and unexpected survivors are trauma patients with a predictedprobability of survival (TRISS) of 0.49 or less that survive.

The TRISS ‘z’ statistic measures the statistical significance of the difference between the actualnumber of survivors among a set of patients and the number expected from outcome norms. Wmeasures the clinical significance of the differences between the actual and unexpectedsurvivors. W is the number of survivors more than would be expected from the outcome normsper 100 patients treated. W can be calculated if the z score is greater than 1.96. Due to thephysiologic parameters used in the Revised Trauma Score, patients who do not have arecorded Glascow Coma Scale (GCS) will not have a TRISS value calculated.

FMC z and W Score

Fiscal Year: April 1,2000 – March 31, 2001

z Score W Score Sample Size

Adult Blunt 2.00 1.92 453

Adult Penetrating 1.32 - 14

Pediatric .024 - 2

Total Subset 2.21 2.08 469

Data: 1995 – 2001

z Score W Score Sample Size

Adult Blunt 3.31 1.58 2229

Adult Penetrating 1.26 - 107

Pediatric 0.56 - 10

Total Subset 3.51 1.62 2346

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WEB PAGE

For further Trauma information, please access the Trauma web page:

http://www.crha-health.ab.ca/clin/rts/index.htm

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Alberta Children’sHospital

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Regional Trauma Services Annual Report 362000/2001

TRAUMA REP0RTALBERTA CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL

FISCAL YEAR: 2000-2001

Dr. Robin Eccles, Chair, ACH Trauma CommitteeMs. Cathy Dobson, Regional Pediatric Trauma Coordinator

PEDIATRIC TRAUMA PROGRAM

Again there have been changes in key personnel in the pediatric trauma program. Dr. RobinEccles continued on as Chair of the Trauma Committee. Unfortunately, we lost Ms. CathyDobson as Regional Pediatric Trauma Coordinator in December of 2000, when she went onmaternity leave. Her position was not filled again until late April 2001, in a new fiscal year.

As well, there was a gap in services for a Data Analyst for the Trauma Registry. However, thePediatric Trauma Program now has a dedicated Data Analyst as of March 2001. We attemptedto expand the role of the Regional Pediatric Trauma Coordinator to a 1.0 FTE position as aClinical Nurse Specialist, but were unsuccessful in obtaining bridge funding for this from theAlberta Children’s Hospital Foundation.

TRAUMA SERVICE ACTIVITIES

The Pediatric Spinal Cord Injury Clinical Practice Guidelines were finalized and released thisyear after much dedicated work from Dr. Cheri Nijssen-Jordan, Ms. M. Butler, and others.

The Trauma Committee Community Membership subcommittee had its first meeting in October2000. It was a very productive and moving event with numerous recommendations arising thatcould make valuable contributions to the care of the pediatric trauma patient and their family.

The Trauma Committee reviewed the audit filters and performance indicators and maderecommendations for changes and additions. Additions include auditing the use of the AlbertaChildren’s Hospital transport team in trauma transports, and for hypothermia in the EmergencyDepartment.

The Trauma Association of Canada Accreditation recommendations are at the same status asin the last fiscal year. Pediatric rehabilitation services are still in need of a dedicated physiatrist.

COMMITTEE REPRESENTATION

• Alberta Children’s Hospital Trauma Committee• Trauma Committee Community Member• Trauma Audit Review Committee• Child Health Advisory Council• Regional Injury Control Committee• Regional Injury Executive Committee• Calgary Injury Prevention Coalition• Trauma Advisory Provincial Working Group• Regional Critical Care Education Committee• ACH Nursing Education Team

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EDUCATION

• Advanced Paediatric Life Support: two modified courses were carried out for Emergencyand Pediatric residents

• Paediatric Advanced Life Support: PALS courses offered frequently at the Alberta Children’sHospital coordinated by Ms. Marguerite Butler, Clinical Resource Nurse

• Trauma Rounds: Trauma Rounds are offered monthly at 0700 hours on the fourth Thursdayof the month. The Pediatric Human Patient Simulator has been used with a trauma scenariofor resident education in handling a major trauma patient

RESEARCH

• The pilot study for the Role of CT scan in Minor Head Injuries has been done. A MRC granthas been applied for in order to complete the next phase of a multi-center study. Dr. C.Nijssen-Jordan is the coordinator of the study.

REGIONAL PEDIATRIC TRAUMA COORDINATOR

The Regional Pediatric Trauma coordinator role continues to evolve and expand. Some of theroles and responsibilities over the past fiscal year are listed in the summary below:

1. DATA MANAGEMENT

• Review all trauma cases through the ACH• Determine if the cases meet Alberta Trauma Registry (ATR) criteria• Collect ATR data and enter into database• Generate reports, analyze data

2. QUALITY IMPROVEMENT

• Compile Trauma Audit reports every 6-8 weeks for regular Trauma Audit Committee reviewof quality improvement and case management issues.

• Developed policies and procedures related to spinal care and the use of Aspen® collars.• Participated in the development of objectives and criteria for the newly formed “Trauma

Committee Community Membership” subcommittee. This included interviewing a family thathas had experience with the Trauma system at the ACH, in order to provide feedback orbring up any issues related to the Trauma care received. The feedback and discussion withthe family provided insight into some strengths and weaknesses of the trauma system fromthe family perspective.

• Ongoing participation with the Alberta Centre for Injury Control and Research (ACICR) in thedevelopment of a comprehensive and efficient Provincial Trauma System.

3. EDUCATION

• Presented annual Trauma Registry statistics at Trauma Rounds• Presented Pediatric Case Studies at Best Practice Nursing Rounds• Instructed PALS courses: April 18, 19, June 15, 16• Participated in ENPC (Emergency Nursing Pediatric Course)• Taught Trauma Orientation to new Emergency and ICU staff• Organized inservices for Aspen collar application for staff• Taught spinal immobilization and logrolling at the first annual “Nursing Skills Fair”

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• Edited and provided feedback on Trauma Protocols developed by ACICR• Attended first annual ‘Trauma Coordinators of Canada’ meeting in Halifax• Presented Pediatric Case presentations at ENIG Conference in Red Deer

Submitted by Dr. Robin C. Eccles, MD, FRCS(C), FRACSPediatric General SurgeonChair, Trauma Committee

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ACH TRAUMA ROUNDS

2000

April 19 Forum on Plastic Surgery: Advances in Trauma and Burn CareDr. Donald McPhalen MD FRCSC, Division of Plastic Surgery.

May 17 Hypothermia in Traumatic Brain InjuryDr. Catherine Ross MD, FRCPC, ICU/Pediatrics.

June 21 Trauma Statistics 1999-2000Ms. Cathy Dobson, BN, Pediatric Trauma Coordinator.

No Rounds July – August

September 20 Pine Lake Disaster & Code Orange ResponseDr. Robin Eccles MD, FRCSC, FRACS, Chair, Pediatric TraumaCommittee.Ms. Cheryl Bourassa, Disaster Response Coordinator.

October 26 Pediatric Spinal Cord Injury GuidelinesDr. Cheri Nijssen-Jordan, MD, FRCPC, Director of Emergency

November 23 Seat Belt Injuries – Abdominal and Spine FocusDr. Paul Beaudry, MD, Division of General SurgeryDr. Carmen Brauer, MD, Division of Orthopedic Surgery

No Rounds December

2001

January 25 Hypothermia: Current Management and OutcomesDr. Catherine Ross, MD, FRCPC

February 22 Isolated Limb InjuriesDr. Elaine Joughin, MD, FRCSC, Division of Pediatric/Orthopedic Surgery

March 22 Gunshot Wounds in TeenagersDr. David Sigalet, MD, FRCSC, FACS, Division of Pediatric/GeneralSurgery

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Performance Indicators

Alberta Children's Hospital

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TRANSPORT OUTSIDE CHR

Patients %

n=42

Patients who came fromoutside the CHR

46/77 59.7

Mode of Arrival

Ground ambulance 17 37

STARS Air Ambulance(rotary wing)

18 39.1

Fixed wing aircraft 6 13

Private vehicle 3 6.5

Unknown mode 1 2.2

Other 1 2.2

PERFORMANCE INDICATORS

As part of the Regional Trauma Services quality improvement process, several indicatorsthroughout the continuum of care are monitored on a regular basis as a measure ofperformance. Some of the indicators stem from audit filters set out by the American College ofSurgeons’ Committee on Trauma. Other indicators were developed at the FMC and the ACH assite specific performance indicators. The following is a summary of these indicators for the ACHfor patients that meet the inclusion criteria for the Alberta Trauma Registry (patients with an ISS>/= 12, and who are admitted to the hospital or die in emergency departments at the ACH).

Mode of Arrival

• Indicates what type of transportation method was used by the patients arriving at the traumacentre, and is based on a known location of injury event.

• Includes those who were transported from the scene (or from a first/second hospital) to thetrauma centre from within the CHR (n=31; 40.3%), and those who were transferred from thescene (or from a first/second hospital) to the trauma centre from outside of the CHR(n=46;59.7%).

Note: Not included are those patients who arrived from an unknown (undocumented) locationor patients who were injured while an inpatient at the trauma centre.

n=42

TRANSPORT WITHIN CHR

n=40

Patients %

Patients who came fromwithin the CHR

31/77 40.3

Mode of Arrival

Ground ambulance 21 67.7

STARS Air Ambulance(rotary wing)

2 6.5

Private vehicle 8 25.8

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Pre-hospital Performance Indicators

GCS </=8 at Scene / Mechanical Airway

• Includes patients with GCS </= 8 at scene recorded by medical personnel. Mechanicalairway includes intubation (nasal and oral), cricothyroidotomy and tracheostomy.

• Yes = Patients with first recorded GCS </= 8 at scene and had mechanical airway asintervention.

• No = Patients with first recorded GCS </= 8 at scene did not have a mechanical airway asintervention.

Note: 26 patients were excluded from analysis due to no GCS documentation at scene, orpatient care record was missing.

n=5Pre-hospitalPerformance Indicator

Yes % Yes No % No

GCS </= 8 at scene /mechanical airway 2 40% 3 60%

Interfacility Transfers From Within CHR

Interfacility transfers include patients who were transferred to the Alberta Children’s Hospitalfrom the Foothills Medical Centre, the Peter Lougheed Centre, or the Rockyview GeneralHospital.

Interfacility Transfers From Within the CHR

n=4Patients %

Foothills Medical Centre 1 1.3%Peter Lougheed Centre 0 0%Rockyview General Hospital 3 3.8%

Transfers From Outside Region 4

Time Spent at Primary Hospital Prior to Transfer to Trauma Centre </= 2 Hours

• Includes patients transferred to trauma centre from primary hospital outside of Region 4 witha known length of stay. Length of stay is defined as a known time of arrival to primaryhospital and known time of departure from primary hospital.

• Yes = Patients spent </= 2 hours at primary hospital prior to transfer to trauma centre.• No = Patients spent > 2 hours at primary hospital prior to transfer to trauma centre.

n=22Transfers FromOutside Region 4

Yes % Yes No % No

Time spent at primaryhospital prior to transfer totrauma centre </= 2 hours

9 40.9% 13 59.1%

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Regional Trauma Services Annual Report 432000/2001

Time Spent at Secondary Hospital Prior to Transfer to Trauma Centre </= 2 Hours

• Includes patients transferred to trauma centre from secondary hospital outside of Region 4with a known length of stay. Length of stay is defined as a known time of arrival tosecondary hospital and known time of departure from secondary hospital.

• Yes = Patients spent </= 2 hours at secondary hospital prior to transfer to trauma centre.• No = Patients spent > 2 hours at secondary hospital prior to transfer to trauma centre.

n=0Transfers FromOutside Region 4 Yes % Yes No % No

Time spent at secondaryhospital prior to transfer totrauma centre </= 2 hours

0 0% 0 0%

Injury Time to Trauma Centre < 4 Hours

• Includes all patients with a known time to trauma centre. (Time of injury event and time ofarrival to the trauma centre.)

• Yes = Patients with known time to trauma centre < 4 hours.• No = Patients with known time to trauma centre >/= 4 hours.

n=44Transfers FromOutside Region 4 Yes % Yes No % No

Injury time to traumacentre < 4 hours

25 56.8% 19 43.2%

Resuscitative Phase

Emergency Department Length of Stay </= 8 Hours

• Includes all patients who went through the trauma centre Emergency Department with aknown length of stay in the Emergency Department. Length of stay is defined as a knowntime of arrival to the Emergency Department and known time of departure from theEmergency Department.

• Yes = Patients with a length of stay in the Emergency Department </= 8 hours.• No = Patients with a length of stay in the Emergency Department > 8 hours.

n=66Resuscitative Phase Yes % Yes No % NoEmergency departmentlength of stay </= 8 hours

64 97% 2 3%

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Regional Trauma Services Annual Report 442000/2001

GCS </= 8 at Trauma Centre / Mechanical Airway

• Includes patients with a first recorded GCS </= 8 in the Emergency Department (regardlessof GCS at scene). Mechanical airway includes intubation (nasal and oral), cricothyroidotomyand tracheostomy.

• Excludes 18 patients that arrived at the trauma centre already intubated, and 8 patients withan unknown GCS, and 52 patients who had a GCS greater than 8.

• Yes = Patients had a mechanical airway as intervention in the trauma centre EmergencyDepartment.

• No = Patients did not have a mechanical airway as intervention in the trauma centreEmergency Department.

n=0Resuscitative Phase Yes % Yes No % NoGCS </= 8 attrauma centre /mechanical airway

0 0% 0 0%

Definitive Care

Craniotomy for Epidural or Subdural Hematoma Within 4 Hours of Arrival at TraumaCentre

• Includes all patients who received a craniotomy at trauma centre.• Yes = Patients received a craniotomy within 4 hours of arrival to the trauma centre.• No = Patients did not receive a craniotomy within 4 hours or arrival to the trauma centre.

n=9Definitive Care Yes % Yes No % NoCraniotomy for epidural orsubdural hematoma within4 hours of arrival attrauma centre

5 55.6% 4 44.4%

Gunshot Wound to Abdomen Managed Operatively

• Includes all patients with a gunshot wound to the abdomen.• Yes = Patient with gunshot wound to the abdomen was managed operatively.• No = Patient with gunshot wound to the abdomen was managed non-operatively.

n=0Definitive Care Yes % Yes No % NoGunshot wound to abdomenmanaged operatively

0 0% 0 0%

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Regional Trauma Services Annual Report 452000/2001

Operative Management of Femur Fracture Within 24 Hours of Admission

• Includes all patients with operative management of femur fracture.• Yes = Patient had operative management of femur fracture within 24 hours of admission to

trauma centre.• No = Patient did not have operative management of femur fracture within 24 hours of

admission to trauma centre.

n=3Definitive Care Yes % Yes No % NoOperative management offemur fracture within 24hours of admission

3 100% 0 0%

Unplanned Return to Operating Room

• Includes all patients with at least 1 visit to the operating room.• Yes = Patient had an unplanned return to the operating room.• No = Patient did not have an unplanned return to the operating room.•

n=35Definitive Care Yes % Yes No % NoUnplanned return tooperating room

1 2.9% 34 97.1%

Admitting Physician Was a Surgeon or an Intensivist

• Includes all patients admitted to the trauma centre (not including emergency departmentdeaths).

• Yes = Patient was admitted to a surgeon or an intensivist.• No = Patient was admitted to a non-surgeon or non-intensivist.

n=77Definitive Care Yes % Yes No % NoAdmitting physician was asurgeon or an intensivist

64 83.1% 13 16.9%

Delayed Diagnosis or Missed Injury

• Includes all patients admitted to the trauma centre.• Yes = Patient had a delayed diagnosis or missed injury during hospitalization at trauma

centre.• No = Patient did not have delayed diagnosis or missed injury during hospitalization at

trauma centre.

n=77Definitive Care Yes % Yes No % NoDelayed diagnosis ormissed injury

3 3.9% 74 96.1%

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Regional Trauma Services Annual Report 462000/2001

Missed C-Spine Injury

• Includes all patients admitted to the trauma centre.• Yes = Patient had a missed c-spine injury within the first 48 hours of admission to the

trauma centre and spinal precautions were removed.• No = Patient did not have a missed c-spine injury within the first 48 hours of admission to

the trauma centre and spinal precautions were removed.

n=77Definitive Care Yes % Yes No % NoMissed C-spine injury 1 1.3% 76 98.7%

Unplanned ICU Admission

• Includes all patients admitted to the trauma centre.• Yes = Patient had an unplanned admission to ICU.• No = Patient did not have an unplanned admission to ICU.

n=77Definitive Care Yes % Yes No % NoUnplanned ICU admission 0 0% 77 100%

Unplanned ICU Readmission

• Includes all patients admitted to the trauma centre ICU.• Yes = Patients had an unplanned readmission to ICU.• No = Patients did not have an unplanned readmission to ICU.

n=46Definitive Care Yes % Yes No % NoUnplanned ICU readmission 0 0% 46 100%

Patient Received an Emergency DPL

• Includes all patients who arrived at the trauma centre.• Yes = Patient received an emergency DPL.• No = Patient did not receive an emergency DPL.

n=68Definitive Care Yes % Yes No % NoPatient received anemergency DPL

0 0% 68 100%

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Regional Trauma Services Annual Report 472000/2001

GCS < 12 With CT of the Head

• Includes patients with a first recorded GCS < 12 in the trauma centre EmergencyDepartment.

• Excludes 18 patients that arrived at the trauma centre already intubated, and 8 patients whohad an unknown GCS, and 50 patients who had a GCS >/= 12.

• Yes = Patient had a first recorded GCS < 12 and received a CT of the head.• No = Patient had a first recorded GCS < 12 and did not receive a CT of the head.

n=2Definitive Care Yes % Yes No % NoGCS < 12 with CT of thehead

2 100% 0 0%

Outcome

Death During Transport

Includes all patients who arrived at the trauma centre.Yes = Patient was declared dead on arrival by emergency department physician.No = Patient did not die during transport.

n=78Outcome Yes % Yes No % NoDeath during transport 0 0% 78 100%

Death During the First 24 Hours of Admission

Includes all patients who died.Yes = Patient died within the first 24 hours of admission.No = Patient did not die within the first 24 hours of admission.

n=7Outcome Yes % Yes No % NoDeath during the first 24hours of admission

4 57.1% 3 42.9%

Death and Probability of Survival

Includes all patients with a valued TRISS score and probability of survival > 20%.Yes = Patient died with a probability of survival > 20%.No = Patient did not die with a probability of survival > 20%.

n=43Outcome Yes % Yes No % NoDeath and probability ofsurvival

0 0% 43 100%

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Regional Trauma Services Annual Report 482000/2001

Mortality

Includes all patients who arrived at the trauma centre.Yes = Patient died.No = Patient did not die.

n=78Outcome Yes % Yes No % NoMortality 7 9% 71 91%

TRISS Methodology

The TRISS methodology uses logistic regression to predict survival based on the RevisedTrauma Score (RTS), injury severity score (ISS), mechanism of injury (blunt vs. penetrating)and patient age. Unexpected deaths are trauma patients with a predicted probability of survival(TRISS) of 0.5 or more that die and unexpected survivors are trauma patients with a predictedprobability of survival (TRISS) of 0.49 or less that survive.

The TRISS ‘z’ statistic measures the statistical significance of the difference between the actualnumber of survivors among a set of patients and the number expected from outcome norms. Wmeasures the clinical significance of the differences between the actual and unexpectedsurvivors. W is the number of survivors more than would be expected from the outcome normsper 100 patients treated. W can be calculated if the z score is greater than 1.96. Due to thephysiologic parameters used in the Revised Trauma Score, patients who do not have arecorded Glascow Coma Scale (GCS) will not have a TRISS value calculated.

ACH z and W Score

Fiscal Year: April 1, 2000 – March 31, 2001

z Score W Score Sample Size

Adult Blunt 0.34 - 4

Adult Penetrating - - 0

Pediatric 0.88 - 39

Total Subset 0.94 - 43

Data: 1995 – 2001

z Score W Score Sample Size

Adult Blunt 0.68 - 21

Adult Penetrating 0.43 - 1

Pediatric 3.80 4.28 306

Total Subset 3.88 4.18 328

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Regional Trauma Services Annual Report 492000/2001

Trauma

Statistics

ISS > 12

April 1, 2000 – March 31, 2001

Foothills Medical CentreAlberta Children’s Hospital

Page 50: Annual Report 2000-2001 - Alberta Health Services · Regional Trauma Services Annual Report 4 2000/2001 INTRODUCTION Dr. John B. Kortbeek, Director, Regional Trauma Services, Calgary

Regional Trauma Services Annual Report 502000/2001

MONTHLY TRAUMA TOTALS

Monthly trauma totals include patients with an Injury Severity Score (ISS) > 12 and who areadmitted to hospital or die in the emergency departments at the Foothills Medical Centre (FMC)and Alberta Children’s Hospital (ACH). Based on these inclusion criteria, these totals represent24.8% of injury discharges at FMC and 11% of injury discharges at ACH (refer to page 15).

While the FMC experienced an increase (8%) in the annual trauma total, the ACH annualtrauma statistics declined slightly (6%).

Due to a multiplicity of factors, including environmental, the month of July accounted for thelargest monthly total at both sites.

Total: 680 (for monthly totals only, all other charts reflect n=679)14 ED deaths, 1 operating room death not admitted (of 4 OR deaths)

Total: 79 (for monthly totals only, all other charts reflect n=78)Includes 1 ED death in October

ACH

3

9

334

577

20

9

45

02468

101214161820

Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Jan Feb Mar

49 50

3641

535161

69

93

645558

0102030405060708090

100

Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Jan Feb Mar

FMC

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Regional Trauma Services Annual Report 512000/2001

MALE/FEMALE RATIO

As noted in previous trauma reports, males continue to outnumber females in the total adult andpediatric trauma population.

Ratio:00/01 – 2.7:199/00 – 3.2:1

Ratio:00/01 – 3.1:199/00 – 1.8:1Excludes 1 ED death

184

495

0

100

200

300

400

500

Males Females

59

19

0

10

20

30

40

50

60

70

Males Females

FMC

ACH

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Regional Trauma Services Annual Report 522000/2001

AGE DISTRIBUTION

Data collected at the FMC continues to demonstrate the national trend; the majority of thetrauma population (57.2%) are between the ages of 15-44, with the greatest representation inthe 15-24 age range. In this fiscal year, 42.2% of the trauma population were 45 or older,compared with 39.8% in 1999/2000 and 40% in 1998/1999, suggestive of the aging of thepopulation.

At the ACH, the data indicates a slight decrease in the percentage of trauma patients > 10 yearsof age, 50% this year compared to 51% in 1999/2000.

00/01 – 57.7% of patients < 44 yrs99/00 – 60% of patients < 44 yrs

00/01 – 50% > 10 yrs99/00 – 51% > 10 yrs

9

30

19

13

7

0

5

10

15

20

25

30

35

<1 1-4 5-9 10-14 >14

22

5265

47

101108114

167

30

50

100

150

200

0-14 15-24 25-34 35-44 45-54 55-64 65-74 75-84 >84

ACH

FMC

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Regional Trauma Services Annual Report 532000/2001

52.4% transportation27.5% falls7.2% violence12.8% other

46.2% transportation24.4% falls6.4% violence23.1% other

MECHANISM OF INJURY

As in previous years, mechanism of injury is reported by three broad categories: transportation,falls and violence. These are in keeping with the focus of the CHR’s injury control initiatives.

Transportation continues to be cited as the “number one” mechanism of injury (MOI) in datacollected at FMC and ACH, accounting for 52.4% and 46.2% of the registry cases respectively.

Falls resulting in major injury accounted for 27.5% (187) of patients at FMC. At ACH, fallsconstituted 24.4% of cases; a marked decrease from 48% in 1999/2000.

Violent causes of injury represent 7.2% of FMC, and 6.4% of ACH trauma registry totals.Limitations of the ISS scoring system in evaluating penetrating injuries may lead to under-representation of violence in the overall picture of violent trauma.

“Other” mechanisms of injury contributed to 12.8% of the total at FMC. At ACH 23.1% (18)patients were admitted for “other MOI”, as opposed to 8% (7) in 1999/2000. The “other”category is further delineated later in this report.

5

19 18

36

0

10

20

30

40

Transportation Falls Violence Other

ACH

FMC

49

187

87

356

0

100

200

300

400

Transportation Falls Violence Other

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The following breakdown of each category (transportation, falls, violence and other) illustratesfurther detail regarding mechanism of injury:

MECHANISM OF INJURY – TRANSPORTATION

00/01 – 52.4%99/00 – 48%

00/01 – 46.2%99/00 – 37%

2 22224

41

265

0

50

100

150

200

250

300

MVC Off Road Pedal Pedestrian Railway Aircraft

1

16

46

9

0

2

46

810

1214

1618

MVC Off Road Pedal Pedestrian Air

ACH

FMC

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Regional Trauma Services Annual Report 552000/2001

MECHANISM OF INJURY - FALLS

00/01 – 27.5%99/00 – 29%

00/01 – 24.4%99/00 – 48%

20

68

99

0

20

40

60

80

100

120

Multi-level Same Level Other/Unspecified

FMC

ACH

5

14

0

2

4

6

8

10

12

14

16

Multi-level Same Level

Page 56: Annual Report 2000-2001 - Alberta Health Services · Regional Trauma Services Annual Report 4 2000/2001 INTRODUCTION Dr. John B. Kortbeek, Director, Regional Trauma Services, Calgary

Regional Trauma Services Annual Report 562000/2001

MECHANISM OF INJURY - VIOLENCE

00/01 – 7.2%99/00 – 11%

00/01 – 6.4%99/00 – 6%

23

2

18

10

14

0

5

10

15

20

UnarmedAssault

Assault withObject

Assault withFirearm

Self-inflicted UnknownAssault

LegalIntervention

FMC

ACH

5

0

2

4

6

Unarmed Assault

Page 57: Annual Report 2000-2001 - Alberta Health Services · Regional Trauma Services Annual Report 4 2000/2001 INTRODUCTION Dr. John B. Kortbeek, Director, Regional Trauma Services, Calgary

Regional Trauma Services Annual Report 572000/2001

MECHANISM OF INJURY - OTHER

00/01 – 12.8%99/00 – 11%

00/01 – 23.1%99/00 – 8%

2

14

13 1

41

1013

2

0

5

10

15

20

25

30

35

40

45

Mechanical Fire/Explosion Animal Submersion Corrosive/HotLiquid

UnintentionalFirearm

Avalanche Tornado Unknown

ACH

FMC

2

43

7

2

012345678

Mechanical Submersion Tornado Corrosive/Hot Animal

Page 58: Annual Report 2000-2001 - Alberta Health Services · Regional Trauma Services Annual Report 4 2000/2001 INTRODUCTION Dr. John B. Kortbeek, Director, Regional Trauma Services, Calgary

Regional Trauma Services Annual Report 582000/2001

TYPE OF INJURY

Type of injury categories are used to broadly describe the type of force that results in injury. Inboth the adult and pediatric population, the majority of injuries are the result of blunt forces.

Blunt: 00/01 – 94.1%; 99/00 – 91.7%Penetrating: 00/01 – 3.2%; 99/00 – 4.8%Burn: 00/01 – 1.6%; 99/00 – 1.9%Other: 00/01 – 1%; 99/00 – 1.6%Other types of injury include drowning, smoke inhalation, hanging, electrical

Blunt: 00/01 – 93.6%; 99/00 – 96%Penetrating: 00/01 – 0; 99/00 – 0Burn: 00/01 – 2.5%; 99/00 – 0Other: 00/01 – 3.8%; 99/00 – 4%

11 7

639

220

100

200

300

400

500

600

700

Blunt Penetrating Burn Other

ACH

FMC

32

73

00

10

20

30

40

50

60

70

80

Blunt Penetrating Burn Other

Page 59: Annual Report 2000-2001 - Alberta Health Services · Regional Trauma Services Annual Report 4 2000/2001 INTRODUCTION Dr. John B. Kortbeek, Director, Regional Trauma Services, Calgary

Regional Trauma Services Annual Report 592000/2001

DIRECT VS TRANSFER

Direct means the patient was transported “directly” from the scene to a trauma centre; whereas,transfer means the patient was initially treated at another facility and then “transferred” to atrauma centre. In 2000/2001, 50.2% of patients were transported directly from the scene to theFMC, and 49.8% were transported from another facility; a shift from the prior year when 59% ofpatients came directly from the scene, and 41% were transferred.

The ACH continues to receive similar numbers of patients directly (52.6%) and from transfers(47.4%).

00/01: direct – 50.2%; transfer – 49.8%99/00: direct – 59%; transfer – 41%

00/01: direct – 52.6%, transfer – 47.4%99/00: direct – 49%, transfer – 51%

338341

0

100

200

300

400

Direct Transfer

4137

0

10

20

30

40

50

Direct Transfer

FMC

ACH

Page 60: Annual Report 2000-2001 - Alberta Health Services · Regional Trauma Services Annual Report 4 2000/2001 INTRODUCTION Dr. John B. Kortbeek, Director, Regional Trauma Services, Calgary

Regional Trauma Services Annual Report 602000/2001

TOTAL AIR VS GROUND

Air transport includes fixed wing and rotary wing aircraft. Ground transport refers to ground(road) ambulance transport. In situations where both modes of transport are utilized to getpatients to FMC or ACH, only the air transport portion will be represented in this collection ofstatistics. Other means of transport include private vehicle, walk-ins or unknown (notdocumented on the chart).

Walk-in: 2Unknown mode of arrival: 2Inpatient at time of injury: 1

1 patient unknown mode of arrival

26

39

12

0

10

20

30

40

50

Air Transport Ground Transport Private Vehicle

ACH

FMC

30

416

228

0

100

200

300

400

500

Air Transport Ground Transport Private Vehicle

Page 61: Annual Report 2000-2001 - Alberta Health Services · Regional Trauma Services Annual Report 4 2000/2001 INTRODUCTION Dr. John B. Kortbeek, Director, Regional Trauma Services, Calgary

Regional Trauma Services Annual Report 612000/2001

GENDER/AGE/MECHANISM OF INJURY PATTERN - FMC

Data from 2000/2001 indicates that transportation accounts for the majority of trauma for malesbetween the ages of 15-55. After this age, falls become the more prevalent cause of majorinjury.

In the female population, the leading MOI is transportation in the 15-84 year age range. At thatpoint, falls then surpass transportation.

Males2 unknown mechanism of injury

Females1 unknown if intentional or non-intentional1 unknown age with mechanism of transportation

70

52

37

20

117

27

1521

1117

95

2 0

8

16

7

39

30

1821

11

21

010

02 0

1712

2 2 02

0

10

20

30

40

50

60

70

80

0-14 15-24 25-34 35-44 45-54 55-64 65-74 75-84 >84

Transportation Falls Violence Other

39

18

10

0

6

1

7

18

1310 8

10

444

97

001

011

0

1

0

25 5

0314

010

5

10

15

20

25

30

35

40

45

0-14 15-24 25-34 35-44 45-54 55-64 65-74 75-84 >84

Transportation Falls Violence Other

Malesn=495

Femalesn=184

Page 62: Annual Report 2000-2001 - Alberta Health Services · Regional Trauma Services Annual Report 4 2000/2001 INTRODUCTION Dr. John B. Kortbeek, Director, Regional Trauma Services, Calgary

Regional Trauma Services Annual Report 622000/2001

GENDER/AGE/MECHANISM OF INJURY PATTERN - ACH

Transportation is the leading cause of injury in males in all age categories above one year.Under one year of age, the leading mechanism of injury is violence.

Violent mechanisms of injury in females are seen in the four and under age category.Transportation related injuries occur most often in the 10-14 year old age category.

7

15

5

10

2

4

22

4

0 0

2

1 0

423

5

00

2

4

6

8

10

12

14

16

<1 1-4 5-9 10-14 >14

Transportation Falls Violence Other

Malesn=59

Femalesn=19

5

1

2 2

0

1

0 00

2

00

11

00

1 1

0

2

0

1

2

3

4

5

<1 1-4 5-9 10-14 >14

Transportation Falls Violence Other

Page 63: Annual Report 2000-2001 - Alberta Health Services · Regional Trauma Services Annual Report 4 2000/2001 INTRODUCTION Dr. John B. Kortbeek, Director, Regional Trauma Services, Calgary

Regional Trauma Services Annual Report 632000/2001

PROCESSES OF CARE AND RESOURCE UTILIZATION

Trauma Team Activations

At FMC, activation of the trauma team is initiated either by the emergency physician, or throughthe pre-hospital process of communication. Three levels of response are available, with thepersonnel who respond dependent upon the level of response activated.

The primary method of tracking trauma team activations (TTAs) is through the use of the TTAcall-out sheet (completed by the unit clerks in the Emergency Department). The followingillustrates the number and level of TTAs from April 1999 to March 2000. As illustrated, therewere 720 level I & II trauma team activations (compared with 643 in the year prior) and 17activations with a level not specified.

Monthly Trauma Team Activation’s 2000/2001

Month Level I Level IIApril/00 10 49May/00 20 48June/00 19 47Total per Quarter 49 144July/00 20 60August/00 15 60September/00 18 73Total per Quarter 53 193October/00 13 65November/00 9 60December/00 17 40Total per Quarter 39 165January/01 8 45Total for year (I&II) 149 547

Level I OtherFebruary/01 22 9March/01 24 13Total (I & other) 46 22Totals for All 195 569

At the ACH, three groups of personnel can be activated for trauma, however, the initialresponse team is primarily in-house emergency department staff. Activation of the trauma teamis through the emergency department, and is one component of pediatric trauma resuscitation.

Page 64: Annual Report 2000-2001 - Alberta Health Services · Regional Trauma Services Annual Report 4 2000/2001 INTRODUCTION Dr. John B. Kortbeek, Director, Regional Trauma Services, Calgary

Regional Trauma Services Annual Report 642000/2001

PHYSICIAN SERVICE ANALYSIS

The majority (38.4%) of trauma patients at the FMC site are admitted under the services ofgeneral surgery. At the ACH, the ICU service is responsible for the majority of traumaadmissions.

This analysis does not reflect transfers of care, nor consulting service involvement.

14 ED deaths – no admitting service1 (of 4) OR deaths – no admitting service1 excluded from other category – admitting service appropriate38.4% admitted to general surgery

12115

46

140

189

261

0

50

100

150

200

250

300

GS ICU NS OS PS CV Other

12357

14

45

05

101520253035404550

ICU Ped OS Ped S NS GS Urology

ACH

FMC

1 ED death – no admitting service

Page 65: Annual Report 2000-2001 - Alberta Health Services · Regional Trauma Services Annual Report 4 2000/2001 INTRODUCTION Dr. John B. Kortbeek, Director, Regional Trauma Services, Calgary

Regional Trauma Services Annual Report 652000/2001

ICU TRAUMA ADMISSIONS

In 2000/2001, the number of trauma admissions to the ICU equated to 34.6% of the monthlytrauma totals – a decline from 38% in 1999/2000, and 39% from 1998/1999.

The ICU admission rate at the ACH is steady at 60% of trauma patient totals.

235 patients went to ICU, however, there were 9 patients with 1 re-admission and 1 patient with two re-admissionsfor a total of 245 admissions• 00/01 – 34.6% of patients went to ICU• 99/00 – 38% of patients went to ICU

60% (46) ICU admissionsNo ICU re-admissions

18

23 24

41

28 29

1417 18

5

10

18

0

10

20

30

40

50

Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Jan Feb Mar

ACH

FMC

32

1

34

0

56

12

6

22

0

2

4

6

8

10

12

14

Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Jan Feb Mar

Page 66: Annual Report 2000-2001 - Alberta Health Services · Regional Trauma Services Annual Report 4 2000/2001 INTRODUCTION Dr. John B. Kortbeek, Director, Regional Trauma Services, Calgary

Regional Trauma Services Annual Report 662000/2001

AVERAGE ICU LOS FOR TRAUMA PATIENTS

The average ICU length of stay (LOS) for trauma patients at FMC has declined from 7.4 days in1999/2000 to 6.7 days this fiscal year.

The average ICU LOS for trauma patients at ACH has risen from 2.3 days in 1999/2000 to 3.3days this fiscal year.

6.96.76.7

0

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

All Patients Survivors Non-survivors

FMC

2.83.33.3

0

1

2

3

4

5

All Patients Survivors Non-survivors

Range all: 1-115Median 4Mode 1SD 9.999/00 average – 7.4

Range survivors: 1-55Median 4Mode 1SD 7.299/00 average – 8.2

Range non-survivors: 1-115Median 3Mode 1SD 15.299/00 average – 5.1

ACH Range all: 1-13Median 2Mode 1SD 3.299/00 average – 2.3

Range survivors: 1-13Median 2Mode 1SD 3.399/00 average – 2.5

Range non-survivors: 1-8Median 2Mode 1SD 2.699/00 average – 1.3

Page 67: Annual Report 2000-2001 - Alberta Health Services · Regional Trauma Services Annual Report 4 2000/2001 INTRODUCTION Dr. John B. Kortbeek, Director, Regional Trauma Services, Calgary

Regional Trauma Services Annual Report 672000/2001

SURGICAL PROCEDURES

Trauma patients may undergo a variety of specialized surgical procedures. Orthopedic surgicalprocedures continue to be performed most frequently for the adult population, while at the ACHplastic surgery procedures were performed most often.

Total OR visits – 575, procedures – 873, hours – 1064Orthopedic procedures account for 42.6% of all operative procedures

Total surgical procedures – 73Plastic surgery procedures account for 35.6% of all operative procedures

ACH

FMC

41151412

140143

181

372

0

100

200

300

400

OS PS GS NS C/V Thoracic Urol ENT OB/Gyne Other

455

14

26

19

0

5

10

15

20

25

30

OS PS NS Other GS Ped S

Page 68: Annual Report 2000-2001 - Alberta Health Services · Regional Trauma Services Annual Report 4 2000/2001 INTRODUCTION Dr. John B. Kortbeek, Director, Regional Trauma Services, Calgary

Regional Trauma Services Annual Report 682000/2001

AVERAGE LENGTH OF STAY

The average LOS for all trauma patients at FMC has decreased this fiscal year from 16.2 daysto 14.5 days, with decreases also in the survivor/non-survivor groups .

At the ACH, data indicates an increased LOS across all three categories when compared with1999/2000.

FMC Range all: 1-413, median 8, mode 5; SD 27, average 99/00 – 16.2Range survivor: 1-413, median 8, mode 5; SD 27.9, average 99/00 – 17.1Range non-survivors: 1-115, median 3.5, mode 1; SD 16.7, average 99/00 – 8.9

FMC Range all: 1-82, median 5, mode 1; SD 17, average 99/00 – 7.3Range survivor: 1-82, median 6, mode 1; SD 17.6, average 99/00 – 7.9Range non-survivors: 1-8, median 1.5, mode 1; SD 2.7, average 99/00 – 1.3

ACH

FMC

8.2

15.214.5

0

2

4

6

8

10

12

14

16

All Patients Survivors Non-survivors

2.7

11.711

0

2

4

6

8

10

12

14

All Patients Survivors Non-survivors

Page 69: Annual Report 2000-2001 - Alberta Health Services · Regional Trauma Services Annual Report 4 2000/2001 INTRODUCTION Dr. John B. Kortbeek, Director, Regional Trauma Services, Calgary

Regional Trauma Services Annual Report 692000/2001

OUTCOMES BY AGE

Generally, outcomes for the elderly (65+) or the very young (<1) trauma patient are poor.However, this fiscal year there was an increase in the survivor rates for these two groups, whencompared to 1999/2000 totals at both sites.

FMC

ACH

8

28

16

12

7

0 123

1

0

5

10

15

20

25

30

<1 1-4 5-9 10-14 >14

Survivors Non-survivors

175

4440

59

8798

102

149

2 1 6 7 8141012

18

0

20

40

60

80

100

120

140

160

0-14 15-24 25-34 35-44 45-54 55-64 65-74 75-84 >84

Survivors Non-survivors

Page 70: Annual Report 2000-2001 - Alberta Health Services · Regional Trauma Services Annual Report 4 2000/2001 INTRODUCTION Dr. John B. Kortbeek, Director, Regional Trauma Services, Calgary

Regional Trauma Services Annual Report 702000/2001

MAJOR MECHANISM OF INJURY/OUTCOME

At both the FMC and the ACH, data indicates that violence claims the highest percentage ofnon-survivors when compared with other mechanisms of injury.

165

4176

316

1182240

Transportation Falls Violence Falls

Survivors Non-survivors

19

4

16

32

210

4

Transportation Falls Violence Other

Survivors Non-survivors

ACH

FMC

Page 71: Annual Report 2000-2001 - Alberta Health Services · Regional Trauma Services Annual Report 4 2000/2001 INTRODUCTION Dr. John B. Kortbeek, Director, Regional Trauma Services, Calgary

Regional Trauma Services Annual Report 712000/2001

OUTCOMES BY ISS

The Injury Severity Score (ISS) is an anatomical scoring tool that provides an overall score forpatients with single system or multiple injuries. The ISS captured in the Alberta TraumaRegistry ranges between 12 and 75. The higher the score the more serious the injury.

Data from both sites continues to show the majority of patients had an ISS between 16 and 25.

ACH

FMC

131

356

7034

6 0 081327301 21

12-15 16-25 26-35 36-45 46-55 56-65 66-75

Survivors Non-survivors

4

12

40

15

0 2 41

12-15 16-25 26-35 36-45

Survivors Non-survivors

Page 72: Annual Report 2000-2001 - Alberta Health Services · Regional Trauma Services Annual Report 4 2000/2001 INTRODUCTION Dr. John B. Kortbeek, Director, Regional Trauma Services, Calgary

Regional Trauma Services Annual Report 722000/2001

TOTAL SURVIVORS/NON-SURVIVORS

Mortality rates at both FMC and ACH have decreased when compared with 1999/2000.

Mortality Rate:00/01 – 11.9%99/00 – 15%

Mortality Rate:00/01 – 9%99/00 – 10.7%

ACH

FMC

598

81

0

100

200

300

400

500

600

700

Survivors Non-survivors

7

71

0

10

20

30

40

50

60

70

80

Survivors Non-survivors

Page 73: Annual Report 2000-2001 - Alberta Health Services · Regional Trauma Services Annual Report 4 2000/2001 INTRODUCTION Dr. John B. Kortbeek, Director, Regional Trauma Services, Calgary

Regional Trauma Services Annual Report 732000/2001

DISCHARGE LOCATION

The majority of trauma patients from both sites are discharged “home”. From thedocumentation in the chart, it is often difficult to determine which, if any, support services maybe provided at “home”, thus “home with support” may be undervalued.

Home:00/01 – 53.9%99/00 – 47%

Home:00/01 – 73%99/00 – 77%

FMC

4

81

2535

6992

34

366

0

100

200

300

400

Home Homewith

Support

AcuteCare

Rehab ChronicCare

NursingHome

Died Other Unknown

733

8

57

0

10

20

30

40

50

60

70

Home Home withSupport

Acute Care Foster Care Died

ACH

Page 74: Annual Report 2000-2001 - Alberta Health Services · Regional Trauma Services Annual Report 4 2000/2001 INTRODUCTION Dr. John B. Kortbeek, Director, Regional Trauma Services, Calgary

Regional Trauma Services Annual Report 742000/2001

TRAUMA TOTALS

In 1992, the inclusion criteria for the Trauma Registry was an ISS > 16. In 1993, this wasrevised to an ISS > 12.

The following graph depicts a nine year span of patients from both sites (including the BowValley Centre 1992-1997) with an ISS ≥ 16.

589 610

541576

368

470 481

551528

0

100

200

300

400

500

600

700

1992/93 1993/94 1994/95 1995/96 1996/97 1997/98 1998/99 1999/00 2000/01

Injury Severity Score > 16

Page 75: Annual Report 2000-2001 - Alberta Health Services · Regional Trauma Services Annual Report 4 2000/2001 INTRODUCTION Dr. John B. Kortbeek, Director, Regional Trauma Services, Calgary

Regional Trauma Services Annual Report 752000/2001

Calgary Health Region Trauma Cases Projection

PROJECTED GROWTH IN ADULT MAJOR TRAUMA CASES FOR SOUTHERN ALBERTA

• For the past 5 fiscal years (1995/1996 through 1999/2000), the average annual adult majortrauma case rate (based on adult major trauma patients treated at FMC) for SouthernAlberta (Health Regions 1 through 5) has been 55 (± 7*) cases per 100,000 adults.

*7 is the standard deviation around the average

• Given a population growth rate of 3% and an average annual major trauma case rate of 55per 100,000 (lower 48/upper 62), the chart below depicts the forecasted number of adultmajor trauma cases that would be admitted and treated at the FMC during the next fiveyears.

• Expected utilization rates for Southern Alberta (RHAs 1-5) was derived using 5 yearaverages between 1995/96 and 1999/00 for defined age-gender cohorts. Maximumutilization rates were derived using the average +1 standard deviation for each cohort andminimum utilization rates were derived using the average -1 standard deviation.

Data Source: Health Assessment Unit

CRHA: Projected Number of Adult (aged 18 and older) Major Trauma Cases to 2004/05 Fiscal Year

562546530515500584564572510

385

573 590 607 626 644

726705685645 665

0100200300400500600700800

95/96 96/97 97/98 98/99 99/00 00/01 01/02 02/03 03/04 04/05num

ber

of a

dult

maj

or tr

aum

a ca

ses

Page 76: Annual Report 2000-2001 - Alberta Health Services · Regional Trauma Services Annual Report 4 2000/2001 INTRODUCTION Dr. John B. Kortbeek, Director, Regional Trauma Services, Calgary

Regional Trauma Services Annual Report 762000/2001

Burn Report

Page 77: Annual Report 2000-2001 - Alberta Health Services · Regional Trauma Services Annual Report 4 2000/2001 INTRODUCTION Dr. John B. Kortbeek, Director, Regional Trauma Services, Calgary

Regional Trauma Services Annual Report 772000/2001

BURN REPORT

The Calgary Firefighter’s Burn Treatment Centre at the Foothills Medical Centre serves as thetertiary care facility for adults of Southern Alberta, South West Saskatchewan and South EastBritish Columbia. Patients with other diagnoses such as frostbite and exfoliative disordersincluding toxic epidermal necrolysis may also be managed in the Burn Unit. Those requiringventilatory support are treated in the Intensive Care Unit at the Foothills Medical Centre.

A multi-disciplinary team whose members include plastic surgeons, nurses, physiotherapists,occupational therapist, nutritionists, and social workers has been developed to care for theparticular needs of this group of patients. The team meets weekly to discuss clinical issues, toaddress social concerns, to conduct educational sessions, and to engage in quality reviewprocedures. Upon discharge, follow-up is arranged in outpatient clinics within the RehabilitationDepartment at the Foothills Medical Centre, thus providing a degree of continuity of care duringthe often-lengthy process of rehabilitation.

Annual Statistics 2000 – 2001

Patients admitted to the Calgary Firefighter’s Burn Treatment Centre or the Foothills MedicalCentre Intensive Care Unit with diagnosis of burn or frostbite:

Number of patients = 60 Male – 45Female – 15

Number of admissions = 65

Age Distribution

Total Length of Stay (days) = 1527

Average Length of Stay (days) = 23.5Range = 1-139

<14 days: 35 of 65

Site of Injury

29 of 60 had facial burns24 of 60 had burns to the hands

6

15

19

13

2 1 13

0

5

10

15

20

11 - 20 21 - 30 31 - 40 41 - 40 51 - 60 61 - 70 71 - 80 81 - 90

Page 78: Annual Report 2000-2001 - Alberta Health Services · Regional Trauma Services Annual Report 4 2000/2001 INTRODUCTION Dr. John B. Kortbeek, Director, Regional Trauma Services, Calgary

Regional Trauma Services Annual Report 782000/2001

Location of Accident

Home 31 (17 within the dwelling)Work 21Motor Vehicle 2Other 6

Type of Burn/Injury Other Factors involved in Etiology

Thermal – flame/contact 42 Cooking Oil 5Chemical 1 Gasoline 13Scald 10 Tar 3Electrical Contact 1 Seizure 4Electrical Flash 5Frostbite 1

Body Surface Area Involvement

<20% 5121 – 40 641 – 60 261 – 80 1

Requirement of Surgical Treatment

50 procedures in 25 patients = 131 hours (Avg. 2.6 hours each procedure)35 patients had no surgery

Smoke Inhalation

6 of 60 required intubation and ventilation in ICU

2 of 60 were intubated prophylactically for suspected heat injury to the upper airway for lessthan 24 hours

Mortality

1 of 60

The number of admissions has remained relatively stable in recent years, reflecting a balance ofgeneral decline in burn injury incidence seen across North America and the increasingpopulation in Calgary and Southern Alberta. The age distribution reflects the characteristicpattern of relatively high incidence in young adults with another smaller peak in old age.Functional impairment, temporary or chronic, through substance abuse, physical or mentaldisability, neurological disease or old age is often a contributory factor, particularly with incidentsin the home. 35% of accidents producing thermal injury occur in the workplace.

Coincident smoke inhalation injury has a major effect on morbidity and mortality in burn patients.The sole death in this twelve month period occurred in a forty-one year old male from a housetrailer fire who suffered ten percent total body surface area burn but a severe inhalation injury,complications of which led to his death after 115 days in the Intensive Care Unit.

Submitted by Dr. Robert Lindsay

Page 79: Annual Report 2000-2001 - Alberta Health Services · Regional Trauma Services Annual Report 4 2000/2001 INTRODUCTION Dr. John B. Kortbeek, Director, Regional Trauma Services, Calgary

Regional Trauma Services Annual Report 792000/2001

Calgary EMS Statistics

Page 80: Annual Report 2000-2001 - Alberta Health Services · Regional Trauma Services Annual Report 4 2000/2001 INTRODUCTION Dr. John B. Kortbeek, Director, Regional Trauma Services, Calgary

Regional Trauma Services Annual Report 802000/2001

Calgary EMS Transport Statistics

This data was calculated from a randomly selected sample of major trauma patients transportedto the Foothills and the Childrens Hospitals from April 1, 2000, to March 31, 2001.

• Requested Data: average, minimum, maximum, and median time from scene totrauma centre:

Ø At a 98% confidence level the mean transport time for major trauma patients (asdefined by PHI) from the scene to the Foothills Medical Centre is between 10minutes 40 seconds (639.79 seconds) to 14 minutes 10 seconds (844.04 seconds).

Ø The minimum transport time from scene to Foothills Medical Centre of the selectedsample was 2 minutes 16 seconds (136 seconds).

Ø The maximum transport time from scene to Foothills Medical Centre of the selectedsample was 28 minutes 28 seconds (1708 seconds).

Ø The median transport time from scene to Foothills Medical Centre of the selectedsample was 11 minutes 32 seconds (692 seconds).

Ø At a 98% confidence level the mean transport time for major trauma patients (asdefined by PHI) from the scene to the Alberta Children’s Hospital is between 10minutes 47 seconds (649.69 seconds) to 18 minutes 48 seconds (1127.55 seconds).

Ø The minimum transport time from scene to Alberta Children’s Hospital of the selectedsample was 7 minutes 36 seconds (456 seconds).

Ø The maximum transport time from scene to Alberta Children’s Hospital of theselected sample was 29 minutes 45 seconds (1785 seconds).

Ø The median transport time from scene to Alberta Children’s Hospital of the selectedsample was 12 minutes 44 seconds (763.5 seconds).

Submitted by:Donald HrynykSupt.of Strategic Initiatives and Tactical ImplementationCalgary Emergency Medical Services

Page 81: Annual Report 2000-2001 - Alberta Health Services · Regional Trauma Services Annual Report 4 2000/2001 INTRODUCTION Dr. John B. Kortbeek, Director, Regional Trauma Services, Calgary

Regional Trauma Services Annual Report 812000/2001

Injury Control

Page 82: Annual Report 2000-2001 - Alberta Health Services · Regional Trauma Services Annual Report 4 2000/2001 INTRODUCTION Dr. John B. Kortbeek, Director, Regional Trauma Services, Calgary

Regional Trauma Services Annual Report 822000/2001

INJURY CONTROL REPORT

Injury and Injury Control Defined:

Injury is defined as the damage that occurs from the transfer of mechanical, thermal, chemicalor electrical energy or the damage resulting from an absence of heat or oxygen. Injuries can beclassified as either intentional or unintentional.

Injury Control is based on the application of an epidemiological approach whereby injuries arenot viewed as random, chance events but rather as predictable and preventable. Factors of thehost, the agent and the environment contribute to injury outcomes and an injury control systemaddresses the full spectrum from primary prevention through treatment and rehabilitation.Priorities for injury control in the Calgary Health Region were established during the RegionalProgram Design Committee process initiated in 1996 and include the following:

• prevention of motor vehicle collisions• prevention of violence (domestic and suicide)• prevention of falls• development of a regional injury surveillance system• enhancement of the regional trauma system• early integration of rehabilitative and community services into the care of the injured.

An Injury Control Approach:

A Regional Injury Control Committee, with representation across all injury control sectors, wasestablished in 1998 and continues to meet on a regular basis to identify injury control issues andto coordinate activity within the identified priority areas. Regular updates are provided aboutthe activities in the prevention, acute care and rehabilitation areas and opportunities for jointeffort are explored. Over the past year the committee has been involved in the following keyactivities:

• support to injury prevention priority areas• input to the development of a Provincial Trauma System Proposal,• participation in the evaluation of the Alberta Centre for Injury Control and Research• exploration of strategies to address the shortage of rehabilitation beds and services in the

region.

Linkages to community based injury prevention organizations is achieved through the CalgaryInjury Prevention Coalition (CIPC), a multi-stakeholder network that has been in existence since1992. The CIPC is a key mechanism for coordination of injury prevention activities and theinfrastructure for the coalition is supported by the Injury Prevention and Control Team within theregional Healthy Communities portfolio.

Burden of Illness:

In the Calgary Health Region (CHR), injuries are the leading cause of death for people betweenthe ages of 1 and 49 and when compared with other disease conditions in this same age groupaccount for the highest volume of potential years of life lost (PYLL). In 1999, the most recentcomplete year of available mortality data, there were 324 injury related fatalities in the CalgaryRegion. This represents a population adjusted injury fatality rate of 35.33 per 100,000. AlbertaHealth and Wellness sets a provincial benchmark for age standardized injury mortality rate per100,000 population. The Calgary Health Region rate is below this benchmark of 45 deaths per100,000, but it is still significantly higher than the rates which have been achieved in some

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European countries. Table 1 below highlights the number of fatalities and potential years of lifelost for all injuries and also for each of the five major injury causes for Calgary Health Regionresidents which include motor vehicle related events, falls, suicide violence and workplaceincidents.

TABLE 1:

Table 1 note: Workplace related mortality was determined utilizing place of injury codes “farm”, “mine”, “quarry”,“industrial plant” and is not mutually exclusive from the other injury categories.

In 2000/2001 there were 5565 injury related hospitalizations and 62,650 injury related visits tothe emergency department. Adjusting for population, this represents an injury hospitalizationrate of 601 per 100,000 population and an injury related emergency department visit rate of6764 per 100,000 population. Table 2 and Table 3 below summarize the hospitalization andemergency department numbers and rates for all injuries and also for each of the major injurycauses.

TABLE 2:

Table 2 note a): Workplace hospitalizations were determined by utilizing visits paid through Worker’s CompensationBoard and this classification is not mutually exclusive of the other injury categories.Table 2 note b): Adjusted rates are standardized to the estimated 1999/2000 mid-year population of the CalgaryHealth Region. Population estimates are from the Alberta Health Registry Database.

1999 Injury Related Fatalities and Potential Years of Life Lost for Calgary Health Region residents

324 19 71 123 12 5

11918

3602827

5061

502 2240

5000

10000

15000

All Injuries Falls MVC Suicide Violence Workplace

Number of fatalities Potential Years of Life Lost

Fiscal year 2000/2001 Injury related hospitalizations and rate per 100,000 for Calgary Health Region residents

5565

2634

560 544 282 333601 284 61 59 30 360

1000

2000

3000

4000

5000

6000

All Injuries Falls MVC Suicide Violence Workplace

Number of hospitalizations Hospitalization rate

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TABLE 3:

Table 3 note a): Workplace emergency department visits were determined by utilizing visits paid through Worker’sCompensation Board and this classification is not mutually exclusive of the other injury categories.Table 3 note b): Adjusted rates are standardized to the estimated 1999/2000 mid-year population of theCalgary Health Region. Population estimates are from the Alberta Health Registry Database.

Injuries are experienced across the lifespan by Calgary Health Region residents, however somegroups have a higher risk for specific types of injuries and some profiles emerge around themajor injury issues. In the area of motor vehicle injuries, those in the 16 to 24 age group aremost at risk and particularly males 16-54 are affected. Women age 75 years and olderrepresent a specific risk group for hospitalization due to a fall injury while the <16 age group ismost at risk for visiting the emergency department because of a fall injury. Suicide is the overallleading cause of injury related death with a significant percentage occurring in young adults. Asa result, suicide represents one of the largest single contributions to premature death. SeeInjury Statistics section for additional age and gender related breakdown.

The societal and economic impacts of injury are enormous. In addition to the direct costs forhospitalization, physician fees, rehabilitation or long term care, there are the indirect costsassociated with loss of future productivity, disability and premature death. When the monetaryimpacts are combined with the personal and social impacts of injury, such as loss ofindependence and disruption of family life, the tremendous toll injury takes on society isrealized.

Injury Control Highlights:

Motor Vehicle Related :

Traffic injuries contribute significantly to the morbidity and mortality in Region 4 and have been atarget for the development of integrated and comprehensive injury control strategies. A majortraffic safety public awareness and social marketing campaign has been undertaken over theprevious three years with involvement of CHR stakeholders as well as community partners suchas The Calgary Police Service and the City of Calgary, Transportation Department. In 2000, thefocus of the initiative was narrowed to intersection safety and the impact of red light violations.This focus reflected the study of key high collision intersections in the city and the opportunitiesfor road engineering, enforcement and education strategies. Red light running is a drivingbehavior which contributes significantly to serious injuries and fatalities.

Fiscal year 2000/2001 Injury related emergency department visits and rate per 100,000 for Calgary Health Region residents

62650

15829

48951816 2700 54686764

1701 529 196 292 590

0

20000

40000

60000

80000

All Injuries Falls MVC Suicide Violence Workplace

Number of Emergency Department Visits Emergency Department rate

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Television, radio, transit and billboards were used to convey the “Red Means Stop” messageover an eight week period. In addition to direct funding from the Calgary Health Region and theCity of Calgary of $230,000.00, an additional $200,000.00 of in-kind partner contributions wererealized. Target audience exposure levels ranging from 23% to 96% were achieved in all of thecampaign mediums. Opportunities to continue to profile the message have also beensupported, including participation in the development and advertising for the Calgary PoliceService portable red light camera program. The police have also initiated a fixed red lightcamera system during this same time period to address the serious issue of red light violations.

An intersection safety survey completed soon after the campaign indicated generally highawareness of the seriousness of red light collisions and strong support for the effectiveness ofred light cameras in both changing attitudes and reducing collisions. A traffic safety generalawareness survey completed in early 2001 indicated that almost half of the regional residentsstated that traffic safety had become more of a concern in the past six months. Almost half ofrespondents also strongly agreed that death and injury caused by motor vehicle collisions is asbig a health issue as cancer, heart disease or AIDS. The percentage of respondents whostrongly agreed with the statement that “information about traffic safety prompts them to thinkabout their own driving behavior” increased significantly in the 2001 survey.

Occupant restraint initiatives are another important area of traffic safety promotion. CalgaryHealth Region staff work with partners such as The Calgary Police Service, Calgary EMS, TheCalgary Fire Department, and Interfaith Thrift Stores to provide child car seat inspection clinics,car seat round up programs, Check Stops and Think, Think Again sessions. Think, Think Againis a program which allows ticketed drivers to attend an education session to have a ticket fornon use of occupant restraints revoked. Twenty six sessions were completed in 2000/2001.

Falls:

The Older Adult Falls Prevention Committee of the CIPC is involved in a number of fallprevention strategies aimed at reducing the number of fall injuries experienced by seniors.Work to date has included the development of a dynamic database of resources related to thetopic that was constructed through direct interaction with the target group and a comprehensiveliterature review. Initial fall prevention messages derived from the database have gone throughfocus group testing with representatives of the target audience. Other activities include theexploration of peer led workshops for fall prevention, development of a profile of fall injuries inolder adults and compilation and development of resource materials. The coalition committee isalso linked to the Regional Senior Health Program and the Healthy Aging Initiatives.

The CIPC Child Working Group, Playground Subcommittee, is involved in a number of schooland community based strategies targeting fall prevention in playgrounds. These strategiesinclude public education, partnership development, demonstration projects, advocacy forupgrade of existing playground facilities, community leadership development and developmentof funding proposals to enable playground improvements. A comprehensive playgroundresource manual for community groups has been developed and is being piloted with a numberof groups.

Violence and Suicide:

Action on the nine comprehensive recommendations from the Regional Suicide Response Planhas been delayed over the past year due to the reorganization of the mental health portfoliowithin the Calgary Health Region and with the Alberta Mental Health Board. Approval has nowbeen given to hire a full time suicide response coordinator within the Health Promotion/DiseasePrevention group of Healthy Communities with strong links to the injury prevention and control

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group. Initial priorities will focus on suicide surveillance and linking with the Medical Examiner’sOffice, as well as on training and on the provision of resource materials for regional staff.The Youth In Focus Committee of the CIPC has also taken a suicide prevention focus over thepast year. Coalition funds have been utilized to provide Applied Suicide Intervention SkillsTraining (ASIST) to youth serving organizations in the Calgary Region. A total of 28 coalitionmembers received the training and follow up activities are planned.

Injury prevention and control staff support the activities of the Domestic Violence HealthInterest Group of the Calgary Health Region Universal screening for domestic violence atCalgary Health Region sites is continuing to develop with a current focus on screeningprotocols and procedures in emergency departments. In addition, 2200 posters and domesticviolence “Help Cards” were distributed to physicians offices across the region to reinforce theimpact of violence on health and to encourage physicians to screen in their client contacts.

Surveillance System Development:

Steady progress has been achieved in the development of an injury surveillance system for theCalgary Health Region. Quarterly injury data on all injuries as well as data broken down by thefive major injury causes is now collected on a regular basis. Additional in-depth study of thefalls data and investigation of sport and recreational injury data is planned for the next year.Data-sharing agreements continue to be streamlined with both the Calgary Police Service andCalgary Emergency Medical Services. Calgary Police Service collision data is now directlydownloaded to the Quality Improvement, Health Information area of the Calgary Health Region.These agreements will facilitate data linkage and timely data sharing..Other Initiatives:

1. CIPC Youth Risk Reduction Strategies:

The Calgary Injury Prevention Coalition (CIPC) sponsors a broad social marketing campaign inthe Calgary Region aimed at improving the risk management skills of youth aged 12-24 years.A variety of strategies are utilized including a social marketing campaign, school basedactivities such as Smartgrad and community based activities such as Youth Week. All activitiesincorporate smartrisk messaging with the core themes as follows:

• Buckle Up• Drive Sober• Look First• Wear the Gear• Get Trained

Significant progress has been achieved in engaging local organizations in the smartrisklanguage and programming. Canada Olympic Park has received seed money from CIPC overthe past two years to support the development of smartrisk messaging at the park. This yearCOP has fully incorporated smartrisk into their business plan and have included the messagingin all park activities and advertising.

A similar approach is under development at Shaw Millenium Skateboard Park, howeverprogress is slow due to the complexities of the partners involved. A Smartgrad resourcepackage for schools was developed and broadly distributed to high schools this year and aninteractive computer based display unit was developed and pilot tested. Evaluation of all ofthese strategies is ongoing.

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2. Safe Community Designation:

The Calgary Injury Prevention Coalition has continued to work towards the designation ofCalgary as a World Health Organization (WHO) Safe Community in collaboration with The Cityof Calgary – Safer City Initiative. CIPC and regional injury prevention and control staff havebeen heavily involved in the work to develop indicators and evaluation criteria for the Safer CityInitiative including the regular tracking of injury data. The designation is expected for May of2002.

Submitted by Nancy StanilandInjury Control Leader, Healthy Communities

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INJURY STATISTICS

Age and gender distributionsfor all injuries and the five major injury causes

April 1, 2000 to March 31, 2001

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Note: All Injuries hospitalizations were determined by utilizing ICD9-CM ecodes E800-E848, E850-E869, E880-E929and E950-E999

Note: All Injuries emergency department visits were determined by utilizing ICD9-CM ecodes E800-E848, E850-E869, E880-E929 and E950-E999

Age and Gender Distribution of Fiscal 2000/2001 Injury Related Hospitalizations

for residents of the Calgary Health Region

271

223260

291 284

237

307

470

421

467511

577

420

238220 225

122

564

0

100

200

300

400

500

600

700

<16Female

16-24 25-34 35-44 45-54 55-64 65-74 75-84 >84 <16Male

16-24 25-34 35-44 45-54 55-64 65-74 75-84 >84

Age and Gender Distribution of Fiscal 2000/2001 Injury Related Emergency Department Visits

for residents of the Calgary Health Region

7157

41473801

3306

2442

13791058

1295934

10239

8089

7360

6119

3304

1382921 651

275

0

2000

4000

6000

8000

10000

12000

<16Female

16-24 25-34 35-44 45-54 55-64 65-74 75-84 >84 <16Male

16-24 25-34 35-44 45-54 55-64 65-74 75-84 >84

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Note: Fall related hospitalizations were determined by utlizing ICD9-CM ecodes E880-E886 & E888.

Age and Gender Distribution of Fiscal 2000/2001 Fall Related Hospitalizations

for residents of the Calgary Health Region

77

45

83 78

129

147

251

361

275

146

100

154166

133

112129

142

106

0

50

100

150

200

250

300

350

400

<16Female

16-24 25-34 35-44 45-54 55-64 65-74 75-84 >84 <16Male

16-24 25-34 35-44 45-54 55-64 65-74 75-84 >84

Age and Gender Distribution for Fiscal 2000/2001 Fall Related Emergency Department Visits

for residents of the Calgary Health Region

2317

643 681 708 663 608 577

892

708

2928

1118988 958

693

402 385 377

183

0

500

1000

1500

2000

2500

3000

3500

<16Female

16-24 25-34 35-44 45-54 55-64 65-74 75-84 >84 <16Male

16-24 25-34 35-44 45-54 55-64 65-74 75-84 >84

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Note: Motor vehicle related hospitalizations were determined utilizing ICD9-CM ecodes E810-E819.

Note: Motor vehicle related emergency department visits were determined utilizing ICD9-CM ecodes E810-E819.

Age and Gender Distribution of Fiscal 2000/2001 Motor Vehicle Related Hospitalizations

for residents of the Calgary Health Region

15

45

37

3127

20 21

9 9

29

9287

57

43

21

1511

4

0

10

20

30

40

50

60

70

80

90

100

<16Female

16-24 25-34 35-44 45-54 55-64 65-74 75-84 >84 <16Male

16-24 25-34 35-44 45-54 55-64 65-74 75-84 >84

Age and Gender Distribution of Fiscal 2000/2001 Motor Vehicle Related Emergency Department Visits

for residents of the Calgary Health Region

197

667

526

398

275

11381

5312

216

759

644

462

285

120

6138

11

0

100

200

300

400

500

600

700

800

<16Female

16-24 25-34 35-44 45-54 55-64 65-74 75-84 >84 <16Male

16-24 25-34 35-44 45-54 55-64 65-74 75-84 >84

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Note: Suicide related emergency department visits were determined utilizing ICD9-CM ecodes E950-E959.

Age and Gender Distribution of Fiscal 2000/2001 Suicide related Hospitalizations

for residents of the Calgary Health Region

33

75

59

67

47

13

73 3

7

5957 56

35

13

6 7

10

10

20

30

40

50

60

70

80

<16Female

16-24 25-34 35-44 45-54 55-64 65-74 75-84 >84 <16Male

16-24 25-34 35-44 45-54 55-64 65-74 75-84 >84

Age and Gender Distribution of Fiscal 2000/2001 Suicide Related Emergency Department Visits

for residents of the Calgary Health Region

131

394

244

216

105

49

10 6 4

36

184 185

150

68

2212 4 1

0

50

100

150

200

250

300

350

400

450

<16Female

16-24 25-34 35-44 45-54 55-64 65-74 75-84 >84 <16Male

16-24 25-34 35-44 45-54 55-64 65-74 75-84 >84

Note: Suicide related emergency department visits were determined utilizing ICD9-CM ecodes E950-E959.

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Regional Trauma Services Annual Report 932000/2001

Note: Violence related hospitalizations were determined utilizing ICD9-CM ecodes E960-E969.

Note: Violence related emergency department visits were determined utilizing ICD9-CM ecodes E960-E969.

Age and Gender Distribution of Fiscal 2000/2001 Violence Related Hospitalizations

for residents of the Calgary Health Region

69

18

118

02 1 1

18

74

5552

20

52 1 0

0

10

20

30

40

50

60

70

80

<16Female

16-24 25-34 35-44 45-54 55-64 65-74 75-84 >84 <16Male

16-24 25-34 35-44 45-54 55-64 65-74 75-84 >84

Age and Gender Distribution of Fiscal 2000/2001 Violence Related Emergency Department Visits

for residents of the Calgary Health Region

127

212182

126

63

12 2 4 0

158

796

473

363

127

27 14 12 20

100

200

300

400

500

600

700

800

900

<16Female

16-24 25-34 35-44 45-54 55-64 65-74 75-84 >84 <16Male

16-24 25-34 35-44 45-54 55-64 65-74 75-84 >84

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Regional Trauma Services Annual Report 942000/2001

Note: Workplace related hospitalizations were determined by utilizing visits paid through Worker’s CompensationBoard and this classification is not mutually exclusive of the other injury categories.

Note: Workplace related emergency department visits were determined by utilizing visits paid through Worker’sCompensation Board and this classification is not mutually exclusive of the other injury categories.

Age and Gender Distribution of Fiscal 2000/2001 Workplace Related Injury Hospitalizations

for residents of the Calgary Health Region

0

5 5

119

11

0 1 0 0

26

88

80

64

22

10

1 00

10

20

30

40

50

60

70

80

90

100

<16Female

16-24 25-34 35-44 45-54 55-64 65-74 75-84 >84 <16Male

16-24 25-34 35-44 45-54 55-64 65-74 75-84 >84

Age and Gender Distribution of Fiscal 2000/2001 Workplace Related Injury Emergency Department Visits

for residents of the Calgary Health Region

3

221249

184142

592 0 0 24

1149

1442

1220

590

164

17 1 10

200

400

600

800

1000

1200

1400

1600

<16Female

16-24 25-34 35-44 45-54 55-64 65-74 75-84 >84 <16Male

16-24 25-34 35-44 45-54 55-64 65-74 75-84 >84