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Vol. 2, No. 10, October 1995 SYNCHRONOUS PRIMARY BRAIN TUMORS Medulloblastoma is regarded by most pathologists to have bipotential differentiation, (i.e., it may differentiate along neuroblastic or glial lines). In the original description of their two cases of neurocytoma, Hassoun et al. [1] compared these tumors with other central ner- vous system neoplasms described in the literature. They noted that three cases of cerebellar neuroblastomas reported and described in the literature could "repre- sent an advanced maturative stage of medulloblasto- mas"; they went even further by stating that they "should rather be called neurocytomas." This statement suggests that there may be at least some histologic overlap or similarity between medulloblastoma and neurocytoma. The ultimate classification of these tumors and the potential relationship between them remains unclear, but the current case may suggest the possibility of a common cell of origin. REFERENCES 1. Hassoun J, Gambarelli D, Grisoli F, et al. Central neurocytoma: an electron microscopic study of two cases. Acta Neuropathol (Berl) 1982;56:151-156. 2. Smoker WR, Townsend J J, Reichman MV. Neurocytoma accompanied by intraventricular hemorrhage: case report and literature review. Am J Neu- roradiol 1991 ;12:765-770. 3. Goergen SK, Gonzales MF, McLean CA. Intraventricular neurocytoma: radio- logic features and review of the literature. Radiology 1992;182:787-792. 4. Kim DG, Chi JG, Park SH, et al. Intraventricular neurocytoma: clinico- pathological analysis of seven cases. J Neurosurg 1992;76:759-765. 5. Rubenstein LJ. Tumors of the central nervous system: atlas of tumor pathol- ogy. Washington, DC: Armed Forces Institute of Pathology, 1972:127-166. 6. Choux M, Lena G, Hassoun J. Prognosis and long-term follow-up in patients with medulloblastoma. Clin Neuorsurg 1983;30:246-277. 7. Pobereskin L, Treip C. Adult medulloblastoma. J Neuro Neurosurg Psych 1986;49:39-42. 8. Koci TM, Chiang F, Mehringer M, et al. Adult cerabellar medulloblastoma: imaging features with emphasis on MR findings. Am J Neuroradio/1993;14: 929-939. 9. Hubbard JL, Scheithauer BW, Kispert DB, et al. Adult cerebellar medullo- blastomas: the pathological, radiographic, and clinical disease spectrum. J Neurosurg 1989;70:535-544. 10. Hughes PG. Cerebellar medulloblastema in adults. J Neurosurg 1984;60: 994-997. Announcement The Office of Continuing Medical Education of the University of Michigan Medical School is sponsoring Radiology in the Desert: Practical Aspects of Radiology and Imaging March 10-14, 1996, at Marriott's Camel- back Inn Resort, Golf Club and Spa in Scottsdale, AZ. Twenty-two hours of Category 1 credit of the Physician's Rec- ognition Award of the American Medical Association will be awarded. An application for accreditation has been submitted to the American Osteopathic Association. Other credits by specialty may apply. The course director is Terry M. Silver, MD, FACR. For more information, contact the Registrar, Towsley Center for Continuing Medical Education, Department of Postgraduate Medicine and Health Care Professions, University of Michigan Medical School, P.O. Box 1157, Ann Arbor, MI 48106-1157; (313) 763-1400, fax (313) 936-1641. 929

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Vol. 2, No. 10, October 1995 S Y N C H R O N O U S P R I M A R Y B R A I N T U M O R S

Medulloblastoma is regarded by most pathologists to have bipotential differentiation, (i.e., it may differentiate along neuroblastic or glial lines). In the original description of their two cases of neurocytoma, Hassoun et al. [1] compared these tumors with other central ner- vous system neoplasms described in the literature. They noted that three cases of cerebellar neuroblastomas reported and described in the literature could "repre- sent an advanced maturative stage of medulloblasto- mas"; they went even further by stating that they "should rather be called neurocytomas." This statement suggests that there may be at least some histologic overlap or similarity between medulloblastoma and neurocytoma. The ultimate classification of these tumors and the potential relationship between them remains unclear, but the current case may suggest the possibility of a common cell of origin.

REFERENCES

1. Hassoun J, Gambarelli D, Grisoli F, et al. Central neurocytoma: an electron microscopic study of two cases. Acta Neuropathol (Berl) 1982;56:151-156.

2. Smoker WR, Townsend J J, Reichman MV. Neurocytoma accompanied by intraventricular hemorrhage: case report and literature review. Am J Neu- roradiol 1991 ;12:765-770.

3. Goergen SK, Gonzales MF, McLean CA. Intraventricular neurocytoma: radio- logic features and review of the literature. Radiology 1992;182:787-792.

4. Kim DG, Chi JG, Park SH, et al. Intraventricular neurocytoma: clinico- pathological analysis of seven cases. J Neurosurg 1992;76:759-765.

5. Rubenstein LJ. Tumors of the central nervous system: atlas of tumor pathol- ogy. Washington, DC: Armed Forces Institute of Pathology, 1972:127-166.

6. Choux M, Lena G, Hassoun J. Prognosis and long-term follow-up in patients with medulloblastoma. Clin Neuorsurg 1983;30:246-277.

7. Pobereskin L, Treip C. Adult medulloblastoma. J Neuro Neurosurg Psych 1986;49:39-42.

8. Koci TM, Chiang F, Mehringer M, et al. Adult cerabellar medulloblastoma: imaging features with emphasis on MR findings. Am J Neuroradio/1993;14: 929-939.

9. Hubbard JL, Scheithauer BW, Kispert DB, et al. Adult cerebellar medullo- blastomas: the pathological, radiographic, and clinical disease spectrum. J Neurosurg 1989;70:535-544.

10. Hughes PG. Cerebellar medulloblastema in adults. J Neurosurg 1984;60: 994-997.

A n n o u n c e m e n t

The Office of Continuing Medical Education of the University of Michigan Medical School is sponsoring Radiology in the Desert: Practical Aspects of Radiology and Imaging March 10-14, 1996, at Marriott's Camel- back Inn Resort, Golf Club and Spa in Scottsdale, AZ. Twenty-two hours of Category 1 credit of the Physician's Rec- ognition Award of the American Medical Association will be awarded. An application for accreditation has been submitted to the American Osteopathic Association. Other credits by specialty may apply. The course director is Terry M. Silver, MD, FACR.

For more information, contact the Registrar, Towsley Center for Continuing Medical Education, Department of Postgraduate Medicine and Health Care Professions, University of Michigan Medical School, P.O. Box 1157, Ann Arbor, MI 48106-1157; (313) 763-1400, fax (313) 936-1641.

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