ANNOTATED BIBLIOGRAPHY ANNOTATED BIBLIOGRAPHY This annotated bibliography is meant to serve as a supplement

  • View
    9

  • Download
    0

Embed Size (px)

Text of ANNOTATED BIBLIOGRAPHY ANNOTATED BIBLIOGRAPHY This annotated bibliography is meant to serve as a...

  • Review of the Literature 

    Regarding Critical Information Needs of the American Public 

    submitted 

    to the Federal Communications Commission 

    by the 

    University of Southern California Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism 

    in collaboration with the University of Wisconsin ‐ Madison 

    on behalf of 

    the Communication Policy Research Network (CPRN) 

    (Volume I ‐ Technical) 

    July 16, 2012 

    ANNOTATED BIBLIOGRAPHY 

      This annotated bibliography is meant to serve as a supplement to the Review of the Literature  Regarding  Critical  Information Needs  of  the American  Public.  It  contains  relevant  references  mentioned  in  the  main  document,  but  also  includes  a  wide  range  of  additional  academic  studies,  reports, and  resources  identified by members of  the Communication Policy Research  Network (CPRN). 

    The  structure  of  this  document  does  not  follow  the  outline  of  the  literature  review.  The  bibliography has  its own set of subareas  independent of sections  in the main document. This  has allowed us more flexibility in the selection and inclusion of pertinent works.   

    Many  of  the  references  on  this  list  could  fit  into multiple  sections  as  they  provide  valuable  information across  the research areas our  team examined. That said, we have elected not  to  duplicate content but to select a single section for each study included here.    We  thank  Matthew  Barnidge  and  Sandra  Knisely,  Ph.D.  Candidates  at  the  University  of  Wisconsin‐Madison  for  their  tireless work.  Special  thanks  to  Soomin  Seo, Ph.D. Candidate at  Columbia University for her dedication and care. We would also like to express our gratitude to  the following Ph.D. students at UW‐Madison who contributed research: Jackson Foote, Magda  Konieczna, Nakho Kim, Manisha Shelat and Mitchell Schwartz, and Asst. Prof. Katy Culver.       

  • CPRN_FCC‐ANNOT.BIB (7/17/12)               

     

    ii

    The list of experts who contributed to this document includes:   

    Sandra Ball‐Rokeach, University of Southern California  Bob Butler, National Association of Black Journalists  Michelle Ferrier, Elon University  Kate Foster, University at Buffalo  Lewis A. Friedland, University of Wisconsin Madison  Ellen Goodman, Rutgers University  Keith Hampton, Rutgers University  Charlotte Hess, Syracuse University  Matthew Hindman, George Washington University  Shawnika Hull, University of Wisconsin Madison  Vikki Katz, Rutgers University  Nancy Kranich, Rutgers University  Matt Matsaganis, University at Albany  Philip M. Napoli, Fordham University  Katherine Ognyanova, University of Southern California  Dhavan Shah, University of Wisconsin Madison  Sarah Stonbely, New York University  Federico Subervi, Texas State University  Daniel Veroff, University of Wisconsin Madison  Carola Weil, University of Southern California  Steve Wildman, Michigan State University  Ernest J. Wilson III, University of Southern California  Danilo Yanich, University of Delaware 

                 

  • CPRN_FCC‐ANNOT.BIB (7/17/12)               

     

    iii

       

    Table of Contents 

       

    1. Critical Information Needs (CIN) and the Media that Serve Them ........................................ 1  1.A Civic and Political ....................................................................................................................... 3  1.B Community and Individual Health ............................................................................................ 23  1.C Economic Development and Opportunity ................................................................................. 37  1.D Education ................................................................................................................................ 42  1.E Emergency and Public Safety .................................................................................................... 49  1.F Environment and Planning ....................................................................................................... 64  1.G Transportation Systems and Issues .......................................................................................... 69 

    2. Critical Information Needs: Performance Metrics and Methodologies ............................... 74 

    3. Barriers in Content Production, Distribution, Participation, and ICTs. ................................ 97 

    4. Communication/Media Ecologies. Traditional and Digital Connections. .......................... 114 

    5. Women and Marginalized Populations, Media Diversity:  Research, Policy and Regulation.  ............................................................................................................................................ 119 

    6. Critical Information Needs and Public Media. Funding Journalism. .................................. 142 

    7. Critical Information Needs and Open Access. Knowledge Commons. ............................... 152 

    8. Relevant Data Sets, Reports, and Case Studies. ............................................................... 159 

  • CPRN_FCC‐ANNOT.BIB (7/17/12) 

     

    1

    1. Critical Information Needs (CIN) and the Media that Serve Them   

    Bridges, J. A., Litman, B. R., & Bridges, L. W. (2002). Rosse’s model revisited: Moving to  concentric circles to explain newspaper competition. Journal of Media Economics, 15(1), 3‐19. 

    This paper reexamines the umbrella model of competition proposed by Rosse in the 1970s and  applies it to the changed situation of the early 2000s newspaper market. It finds the market to  be more  fluid with different and  separate advertising and  circulation behaviors  compared  to  those found previously. While the  layer aspect of the Rosse’s original model  is applicable, the  authors  propose  a  concentric  ring  model  which  better  reflects  the  variety  and  fluidity  of  newspaper market  roles and metropolitan geographic  relations. According  to  the  ring model,  the comfortable world of fixed market segmentation no longer exists. Instead, each newspaper  competes  differently  at  any  level  in  its  broad  regional  market  for  advertising,  seeking  to  preserve  its domain and product niche against the  flood of new technologies and new media  services.     

    Connolly‐Ahern, C., Schejter, A., Obar, J., & Martinez‐Carrillo, N. (2009, September). A slice of  the pie: Examining the state of the low power FM radio service in 2009. Paper presented at  37th Research Conference on Communication, Information and Internet Policy in Arlington,  VA. Retrieved June 11, 2012, from ssrn.com/abstract=2000228 

    This  research  looks  at  the  state of  low‐power  FM  (LPFM)  stations nearly  ten  years  after  the  Federal Communications Commission created a new class of such stations  in 2000. The study  finds that the LPFM stations are not in congruence with the FCC’s goals in establishing the LPFM  licensing scheme to “give voice to the previously voiceless.” Local programming makes up only  a portion of the LPFM stations’ offerings. Instead, large institutions – particularly religious ones  – have taken on a sponsorship role in the LPFM radio service, with the LPFM operators defining  their  activity  first  and  foremost  not  as members  of  local  community  but  of  their  religious  denomination. The author warns that this may result in the silencing of the very local voices –  the  voices  of  political  activism,  diversity  and  even  dissent  –  that  were  supposed  to  be  strengthened by the LPFM policy.    

    Greve, H. R., Pozner, J., & Rao, H. (2006). Vox populi: Resource partitioning, organizational  proliferation, and the cultural impact of the insurgent microradio movement. American  Journal of Sociology, 112(3), 802‐837. 

    This study integrates the literatures on the production of culture and organizational ecology to  analyze how low‐power FM (LPFM) radio stations arose in response to increased consolidation  in the radio industry, and to  investigate the impact of LPFM stations on radio listening.  One of  the research findings is that the level of concentration of ownership of radio stations in a local  market was a significant predictor of the number of applicants for a LPFM license. 

  • CPRN_FCC‐ANNOT.BIB (7/17/12) 

     

    2

     

    Hood, L. (2007). Radio reverb�: The impact of “local” news reimported to its own community.  Journal of Broadcasting & Electronic Media,